Skip to main content

Full text of "City Documents"

See other formats


=i#2fti» 



CITY DOCUMENTS 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



M ASS AC H U S ETTS 



FOR "THE 



YEAR 1918-1919 




LOWELL. MASS. 



BUCKLAND RINTING "" gagg * " 72-74 MIDDLE STREET 

1919 



Extract from the Ordinances 

of lowell 



CHAPTER VIII— CITY DOCUMENTS. 

Section 5. All City Documents (except the Rules and 
Regulations for the Government of the Police and Fire De- 
partments) shall be printed in pamphlet form of the size of 
the Annual Report of the School Committee. 

Section 6. All City Documents shall be bound together 
in one volume, under the direction of the City Clerk, and 
■three or more copies shall be placed in the City Library, and 
one copy in the library of the Middlesex Mechanics' Associa- 
tion, one copy shall be sent to each City of the Commonwealth, 
to the library of the Harvard College, the Public Library of 
Boston, the State Library, the Smithsonian Institute at 
Washington, and the Old Residents' Historical Association 
of Lowell. 



CONTENTS 



Ninety-third Annual Report of the School Commit- 
tee of Lowell, together with Fifty-fifth Annual 
Report of Superintendent of Schools, 1918. 



2. Auditor's Eight-Third Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Lowell, also 
General Information for the financial year end- 
ing- December 31, 1918. 



Seventh Annual Report of the Commissioner of Water 
Works, and *the Reports of the Superintendent 
of Water Works and the City Engineer, for the 
year ending' December 31, 1918. 



4. Reports of the Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1918. 



5. Report of the Board of Health, 1918. 



6. Seventh Annual Report of Fire Commissioner, 1918. 



7. Reports of the Trustees of the City Library f or 1918. 



8. Report of the City Solicitor for the year ending - De- 
cember 1918. 



9. List of Jurors for the year 1919. 



10. Annual Report of the Police Department, December 
31, 1918. 



Ninety-Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



City of Lowell 



AND THE 



Fifty-Fifth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Schools 

1918 




Lowell, Massachusetts 
Butterfield Printing Company 



CITY OF LOWELL 



Office of the School Committee, 

Lowell, Mass.. April 29, 1919. 

At a meeting of the School Committee, held on this date, it was voted 
to adopt the report of the Superintendent of Schools for 1918 as the re- 
port of the School Committee for that year and to authorize the printing 
of the report. 

In accordance with this vote the report is herewith submitted. 

HUGH J. MOLLOY, 

Secretary. 



ORGANIZATION 

OF THE 

School Committee 
1918 



JOHN H. LAMBERT, M. D., ^Chairman 

RICHARD BRABROOK WALSH 

(Elected Chairman Jan. 28.) 

HUGH J. MOLLOY, Secretary 



MEMBERS 

Term Expires 

JULIAN B. KEYES 1918 

102 Third St. 

JOHN H. LAMBERT, M. D 1918 

70 Wannalancit St. 
**JOHN C. LEGGAT 1918 

640 Broadway. 
WILLIAM R. THOMPSON, D. M. D 1919 

68 Grove St. 
RICHARD BRABROOK WALSH 1919 

223 Parkview Ave. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

January 29 May 28 September 24 

February 26 June 25 October 29 

March 26 July 30 November 26 

April 30 August 27 December 31 

*Resigned Chairmanship to enter active military service January 28. 
**In military service in France. 



4 ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1918 

ADMINISTRATION 

Superintendent of Public Schools 

HUGH J. MOLLOY 

Office in City Hall 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon session of the schools; 
at other times, including' Saturdays, by appointment. 



Clerk 

FANNIE A. THOMPSON 



Supervisor of Primary Grades 

ALICE T. LEE 

Office Hours — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 3.45 to 4.45 p. m. 
- at the office of the Superintendent of Schools. 



Supervisor of Janitors 

WILLIAM F. THORNTON 

Office in City Hall, Third Floor 

Office Hours — 12 m. to 1 p. m. 



Supply Agent 

HENRY L. WILLIAMS 
Office in School Supply Room, City Hall. 



Clerk 

FRED JOHNSTON 
Hours— 7.45 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Clerk in Attendance Office 
MARY V. MALONEY 



Attendance Officers 

William F. Thornton, Camille Roussin, Henry L. Williams, John J. Walker, 

Office— Third Floor of City Hall 

Office Hours : 

9 to 4 o'clock daily, except Saturday; Saturday 9 to 1 o'clock. 



ORGANIZATION 



OF THE 



School Committee 
1919 



RICHARD BRABROOK WALSH, Chairman 
HUGH J. MOLLOY, Secretary 



MEMBERS 

Term Expires 

WILLIAM L. CROWLEY 1920 

25 Sarah Ave. 

JULIAN B. KEYES 1920 

65 Fairmount St. 

GEN. GARDNER W. PEARSON 1920 

59 Clitheroe St. 

WILLIAM R. THOMPSON, D. M. D 1:919 

68 Grove St. 

RICHARD BRABROOK WALSH 1919 

223 Parkview Ave. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

January 28 May 27 September 30 

February 25 Tune 24 October 28 

March 25 July 29 November 25 

April 29 August 26 December 30 



ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1919 
ADMINISTRATION 

Superintendent of Public Schools 

HUGH J. MOLLOY 

Office in City Hall 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon session of the schools; 

at other times, including Saturdays, by appointment. 



Clerk 
FANNIE A. THOMPSON 



Supervisor of Primary Grades 
ALICE T. LEE 

Office Hours — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 3.45 to 4.45 p. m.„ 
at office of the Superintendent of Schools. 



Supervisor of Janitors 

WILLIAM F. THORNTON 

Office in City Hall, Third Floor 

Office Hours — 12 m. to 1 p. m. 



Supply Agent 

HENRY L. WILLIAMS 
Office in School Supply Room, City Hall. 



Clerk 
LEDA C. LAMONTAGNE 



Stock-keeper in School Supply Department 
FRED JOHNSTON 



Clerk in Attendance Office 
STELLA G. MALONEY 



Attendance Officers 

William F. Thornton, Camille Roussin, Henry L. Williams, John J. Walker, 

Vera E. Groves 

Office— Third Floor of City Hall 

Office Hours : 

9 to 4 o'clock daily except Saturday ; Saturday 9 to 1 o'clock. 



REPORT OF THE 

Superintendent of Schools 



Office of the Superintendent of Schools, 

Lowell, Mass., April 29, 1919. 

To the School Committee of Lowell : 

The following report, for the year 1918, is respectfully submitted. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

Valuation of City $98,774,850.00 

Valuation of school property 2,250,000.00 

Rate of taxation ($23.80 per $1000) 

Expenditures for Day Schools 521,538.66 

Expenditures for Evening Schools 13,958.99 

Day School expenditures to total valuation 528 per cent. 

Day and Evening School expenditures to total valuation 542 per cent. 

Population by census of 1915 107,978 

*Number of polls 28,202 

Number of public day schools 62 

One high, thirteen grammar, thirty-two primary, two 

mixed, fourteen kindergartens. 

Number of school buildings 51 

Occupied by public schools, 49 ; occupied by vocational 

Schools, 2. 
Elected teachers, Dec. 31: on leave, 8; in service, 342; 

total, 350. 

Permanent substitutes 10 

Subdivisions of Elected Teachers in service 

High, 15 men, 41 women; Grammar, 7 men, 144 

women ; Primary, 97 women ; Mixed, 4 women ; 

Kindergarten, 23 women ; Drawing, 2 women ; 

Music, 1 man, 1 woman ; Sewing, 4 women ; Manual 

Training, 2 men; Supervisor of Primary Grades, 

1 woman. 
Teachers in Evening Schools, counting principals, term of 

1917-1918 74 

Pupils enrolled in Evening Schools, term of 1917-1918 2,676 

High, 1,459; Elementary, 1,217. 

* (Soldiers exempted, 1500.) 



8 superintendent's report 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in Day Schools, 1917-18 13,556 

High, 1,635; Grammar, 6,443; Primary, 4,641; Mixed, 

168; Kindergarten, 669. 
Average number belonging to Day Schools, 1917-18 11,642 

High, 1,423; Grammar, 5,704; Primary, 3,953; Mixed, 

140 ; Kindergarten, 422. 
Average Attendance, 1917-18 10,668 

High, 1,368 ; Grammar, 5,289 ; Primary, 3,555 ; Mixed, 

123 ; Kindergarten, 333. 
Average per cent, of attendance, 1917-18 

High, 96 ; Grammar, 92.7 ; Primary, 90 ; Mixed, 87.8 ; 

Kindergarten, 78.9. 
Average membership for year ending December, 1918 11,512 

High, 1,391; Grammar, 5,672; Primary, 3,890; Mixed, 

142; Kindergarten, 418. 
Number of school rooms in actual use in June, 1918 312 

High, 50; Grammar, 145; Primary, 98; Mixed, 4; 

Kindergarten, 15. 
Number of school rooms in actual use in December, 1918 310 

High, 50; Grammar, 144; Primary, 97; Mixed, 4; 

Kindergarten, 15. 
Average number to each room for year ending June, 1918 

High, 28.4; Grammar, 39.3; Primary, 40.3; Mixed, 

35 ; Kindergarten, 28. 
Average number to each room for year ending December, 

1918 

High, 25.8; Grammar, 39.4; Primary, 40; Mixed, 

35.5 ; Kindergarten, 28. 
*Average cost of each pupil for tuition only, based on 

average number belonging 

High, 49.33 ; Grammar, 27.65 ; Primary and Mixed, 

23.63 ; Kindergarten, 39.45. 
Average cost per pupil, based on the average number be- 
longing, and on the total expenditures for tuition, 

janitor service, medical inspection, supervision, sup- 
plies, fuel, and all incidentals $46.52 

*Not including training schools. 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

Boys: Buildings, 1; rooms, 9; teachers, 8; pupils enrolled, 107; average 

number belonging, 79; average number attending, 73; per cent, of 

attendance, 92.4. 
Girls : Buildings, 1 ; rooms, 7 ; teachers, 5 ; pupils enrolled, 53 ; average 

number belonging, 53; average number attending, 46; per cent, of 

attendance, 86.7. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures 

Appropriated and Assessed in 1918 $566,904.06 

Amount Disbursed 573,204.06 

Deficit 6,300.00 



Teachers of Day Schools : 

High School $ 68,568.17 

Grammar Schools — Butler School $16,685.89 

Colburn School 7,883.48 

Edson School 9,935.74 

Green School 11,525.59 

Greenhalge School 10,934.86 

Lincoln School 12,581.78 

Moody School 9,929.49 

Morey School 16,267.46 

Pawtucket School 11,130.78 

Riverside School 3,923.30 

Varnum School 15,637.89 

Washington School 9,848.70 

$136,284.96 

Primary and Mixed Schools $ 83,814.36 

Kindergartens 15,148.53 

Special Teachers 10,450.70 

Substitutes 7,102.25 

Total paid for instruction in Day Schools $321,368.97 

School Physicians, Dentist and School Nurses : 

School Physicians and Dentist $2,480.00 

School Nurses and Assistant to Dentist 1,818.50 

$ 4,298.50 

*State agreement on Training Schools $ 30,700.66 

Janitors : 

Janitors of Day Schools $ 55,146.98 

Repairer of Furniture $ 927.30 

Evening Schools : 

Teachers, High and Elementary Schools $9,622.50 

Janitors 1,421.75 

$ 11,044.25 

*See Page 28. 



10 superintendent's report 

Cost of Supervision : 

Superintendent of Schools $3,500.00 

Office Assistant 869.02 

Attendance Officers (four) 6,007.27 

Clerk in Attendance Office 341.56 

Assistant in Supply Room 989.00 

Clerk in Supply Room 35.00 $ 11,741.85 

Military Service 2,786.14 

Deficit (from 1917) 9,447.54 

$ 23,975.53 

Vocational School Teachers and Janitors .... $27,612.05 

Vocational School Deficit 1,306.21 

28,918.26 

Total Salaries, Vocational Schools omitted $447,462.19 

Total Salaries, Vocational Schools included $476,380.45 

Expended for bills for the year, 1918 : 

Coal (Evening Schools, $784.30) $37,567.48 

Wood $ 646,50 

Water (Evening Schools, $35.00) 2,306.88 

Board of Truants 1,648.25 

Electricity (Evening Schools, $1200.00) 2.163.17 

Gas 2,011.21 

General Repairs 1,587.30 

Electrical Repairs 739.50 

Furniture 926.39 

Books (Evening Schools, $100.00) 4,148.98 

Paper and Supplies (Evening Schools, $200.00) .... 7,886.51 

Kindergartents 420.00 

Printing (Evening Schools, $125.75) 1,945.69 

Manual Training (Evening Schools, $150.00) 1,051.30 

Janitor Supplies 2,168.67 

Apparatus 140.53 

Dental Supplies 195.91 

Medical Supplies 209.42 

Cooking, Etc 2,684.10 

Material for Sewing 438.16 

Autos 1.279.61 

Graduations (Evening Schools, $64.26) 811.74 

Regiment 518.52 

Telephones 681.51 

Transportation 1,167.78 

Typewriters 3,585.00 

Miscellaneous (Evening Schools, $255.43) 378.39 

Appropriation Transfers 8,726.96 

Total $ 88.035.46 



superintendent's report 11 

Bills, Vocational School $ 8,788.15 

Total of Bills, Vocational School included $ 96,823.61 

Salaries and bills, Vocational School omitted $535,497.65 

Salaries and bills, Vocational School included $573,204.06 

Analysis of Vocational School Expense 

Salaries of Day Teachers $ 21,044.81 

Janitors of Day Schools 2,100.24 

Salaries of Evening School Teachers 3,795.00 

Janitors of Evening" Schools 672.00 

Total of Salaries $ 27,612.05 

Equipment and Supplies 8,788.15 

Deficit (from 1917) 1,306.21 

Total Expenditures for Vocational School $ 37,706.41 

Expended by Public Property Department 51,402.35 



Receipts 

The receipts by the general treasury on account of the 
school department during the year were as follows : 

Tuition in public schools $ 11,319.75 

Sale of text-books and supplies and badges 11.14 

$ 11,330.89 

Vocational School Tuition and Earnings $ 5,060.18 

Reimbursement from State 14,829.92 

$ 19,890.10 

$ 31,220.99 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

(Discussion) 

The total amount expended by the School Committee for all 
purposes for the year 1918 was $573,204.06, of which sum 
$9,447.54 was a deficit carried over from the year 1917; the ex- 
penditure for the year 1917 was $517,357.33. The increase in 
expenditure was $46,499.19. 

During the summer of 1918 the salary schedules were re- 
vised in general as follows: salaries of less than $1,000 were in- 
creased twenty per cent.; salaries of $1,000 or over and less than 



12 superintendent's report 

$1,500 were increased fifteen per cent.; salaries of $1,500 or 
over were increased ten per cent. 

The large items of increase are as follows: high school, 
$4,204; grammar schools, $8,836; primary and mixed schools, 
$4,439; kindergartens, $980; State agreement, $3,307; the sum 
of $2,786 was paid on account of employees of the department 
who entered the military service of the United States. 

As a result of a smaller registration in the vocational school 
there was a reduction of $3,094 in the expenditure for that school. 

An increased expenditure of $15,442 for bills is easily ex- 
plained when one considers the high cost of fuel and all other 
materials; there was also an unusual expenditure of $3,585 for 
typewriters for the high school. 

The receipts by the general treasury on account of the 
school department, made up of tuition in the public and voca- 
tional schools and reimbursement by the State on account of the 
vocational school, was $3 1,220.99. Therefore the net expenditure 
for the year 1918 was $541,983.07. 

There is bound to be further increase in the expenditures 
for schools in the immediate or near future, as it is generally 
conceded that the teachers of the city, the state, and country do 
not today receive salaries which are adequate or in keeping with 
the value and importance of their work and the professional 
preparation for their calling which is now demanded. 



On page 7, in the Summary of Statistics, the valuation of 
the city is given as $98,774,850; comparing this sum with the 
valuations for 1916 and 1917, it would appear that the taxable 
valuation of the city was somewhat stationary. 

The city treasury received from the State as income from 
intangibles $102,874.67; while it would not be correct to compute 
additional valuation from this sum as a basis, it is nevertheless 
only fair to say that the city derived an income equal to an in- 
come by taxation from a valuation of between four and live 
millions more than the recorded city valuation. 



superintendent's report 13 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

For a number of years, the census of children of school age 
was taken by attendance officers and school janitors; but, for the 
last two years the census has been taken through the schools 
themselves and there is a card enrolment of all children between 
five and sixteen years of age. 

The chief attendance officer has informed me that the results 
obtained by the method now prescribed by law are better than 
those formerly obtained; they are not perfectly satisfactory, 
however, and they will not be until all who are connected with 
both public and private schools carry out the provisions of the 
law to the letter. 

The following data were obtained from the census of 1918 : 

Males Females Total 

(a) Five years of age or over and under seven 1,575 

(b) Seven years of age or over and under 

fourteen 9,331 

(c) Fourteen years of age or over and under 

sixteen 997 



1,563 


3,138 


9,286 


18,617 


1,015 


2,012 



11,903 11,864 23,767 
A comparison of these figures with the figures in the report 
for the year 1917 will show that there has been much more care- 
ful enumeration of children during the past year; the total for 
1917 was 20,366 and,. therefore, the figures for 1918 show an in- 
crease of over 3,000. This increase is of course partly due to 
the increase in population but it is largely due to a greater degree 
of thoroughness in keeping the census. 

There are altogether too many children of elementary school 
age in Lowell who do not attend school as regularly as the law 
demands ; the law requires that "each child between seven and 
fourteen years of age shall attend a public day school or some 
other day school approved by the school committee during the 
entire time the public schools are in session. The superintendent 
of schools, or teachers in so far as authorized by the superin- 
tendent or school committee, may excuse cases of necessary 
absence for causes other than physical or mental deficiency not 
exceeding five day sessions or ten half day sessions in any period 
of six months." 



14 superintendent's report 

According to this quotation the law takes direct issue with 
those parents and guardians who assume that they have a right 
to keep children at home whenever they wish to do so and for 
reasons which are not considered sufficient under the law. The 
school laws of Massachusetts have sought to secure to children 
reasonable educational advantages, but it is only too well known 
that many children are denied these advantages through ignorance 
and neglect of parents and because public opinion does not seem 
to be quite ready for the strict enforcement of the law. 



SCHOOL HOUSES 
High School 

In the report for 1917 it was stated that the work of pro- 
viding adequate high school accommodations was at a complete 
standstill ; the war with all its engrossing interests has been in 
part the cause of the failure to take up and put through the 
building of a new high school but there were also other causes 
which need not be referred to in this place which held back the 
prosecution of a most important and necessary enterprise. 

The needs of the high school have been commented upon 
so often and at such length that it is unnecessary to say anything 
along that line in this report; all who are familiar with the 
present housing facilities for a high school and who have any 
adequate conception of what a high school should furnish are 
impatient at the delay in high school construction and are anxious 
to see the work begun and completed in the very near future. 



Elementary Schools 

In the school report of last year the completion of a fine 
addition to the Pawtucket school was recorded ; this year we are 
able to record the practical completion of a large and fine addi- 
tion to the Bartlett school. 



superintendent's report 15 

The original building, erected about twenty-five years ago, 
was itself in need of many changes and improvements. 

The entire Fuller and Warren system of sanitaries was re- 
moved and modern plumbing was installed, these changes 
necessitating the construction of a new sewer. 

New drinking fountains and lavatories were installed. 

As the original building had not been provided with means 
for lighting, a complete electric light system was installed and 
new lighting fixtures were put in. 

The double wardrobes at the rear of the first and second 
floors were changed to small auxiliary rooms, separated from the 
corridor by partitions made almost entirely of glass. The other 
wardrobes were changed to store-rooms, to take the place of 
these wardrobes, alcoves with sliding doors and ventilated into 
the main room vents were provided in the class rooms. 

Another steam boiler was installed to meet the demands of 
the enlarged school and the boiler-room was provided with elec- 
trical ash hoists. 

The basement of the addition, which is mostly above the 
outside grade, contains one combination class and emergency 
room, one class room, one fan room, two plant rooms, and a large 
gymnasium and play room for boys ; there are also several 
emergency closets, lavatories and shower baths. 

Each of the first and second stories has three classrooms and 
two auxiliary rooms, all provided with wardrobes, blackboards, 
bookcases, etc. 

The first floor has two conference rooms and the second floor 
has the supervisors' office and a rest room, these rooms being 
provided with private toilets ; it should be noted also that each 
floor has emergency toilets. 

The third floor of the old building was not finished and had 
been used as a storage room ; it is now used for the cooking room, 
kitchen, etc. 

The roof of the addition is flat and is covered with Spanish 
roofing tile ; it is to be used as an open air class room ; the brick 
walls around this roof are about eight feet high and they inclose 
a space which is one hundred thirty-five feet long and about 
forty-five feet wide. 



16 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



The entire building, old and new, now has thirty-three class- 
rooms, auxiliary and conference rooms, one cooking room, one 
music room, one manual-training room, two plant rooms, sepa- 
rate playrooms, storage rooms, etc. The building, which is used 
for training and observation purposes in connection with the 
State Normal School, will be very complete and will speak with 
emphasis of Lowell's desire to co-operate to the fullest extent 
with the State in the cause of education. 



A word must be said in this place again of the need of in- 
creased school accommodations at the Morey, Washington, and 
Lincoln school districts ; a number of the children in these dis- 
tricts are attending school under rather unfavorable conditions 
on account of the need of more room. 

Nor should the public be allowed to lose sight of the fact 
that we still have too many small school buildings in the system 
and that groups of these should be gradually abandoned and re- 
placed by larger and more modern buildings. 



RESIGNATIONS, ELECTIONS, AND RETIREMENTS 

The following lists give the changes in the roll of teachers 
and other employees, due to elections, resignations, and retire- 
ments : 



Resigned 



Mrs. Marie Sullivan Ariselmo, 
Clara I. Farrington, 
Albra W. Hersome, 
Annabelle C. Lowney, 
Mary V. Maloney, 
Percy W. Price, 
Alice Richardson, 
Frederick D. Rolfe, 
Bertha M. Rowlandsfcn, 
Jesse D. Sallee, 
Grace R. Sanders, 



High School 

Clerk, Vocational School 

Schoolhouse Janitor 

High School 

Clerk, Attendance Office 

Vocational School 

High School 

Schoolhouse Janitor 

Green School 

High School 

Charles W. Morey School 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



17 



Elected 



Theodore A. Archibald, 
Edward W. Bean, 
Katherine F. Brady, 
Wilbur R. Cole, 
Mary F. Concannon, 
Mary G. Dudley, 
Regina Frappier, 
Walter O. French, 
Hazel A. Gardner, 
Wilbur W. Gavill, 
Vera E. Groves, 
John E. Hart, 
Albra W. Hersome, 
Irene G. Hogan, 
Leda C. Lamontagne, 
Ellen F. Lynch, 
Bernard F. McArdle, 

Margaret E. McCann, 

Margery F. McMaster, 

Stella G. Moloney, 

Alice F. Morrill, 

Ellen T. Muldoon, 

Nellie F. Murphy, 

Anna C. O'Dwyer, 

Flora A. Owen, 

James F. Peebles, 

Elizabeth Provencher," 

Thomas F. Quinn, 

Ida L. Samuels, 

Ernest A. Shafter, 

John J. Savage, 

Emma E. Y. Slaughter, M. D. 

Morton A. Sturtevant, 

Mary A. Tobin, 
A. Edwin Wells, 
Gertrude Weinbeck, 
Celia B. Wood, 
Ralph S. Webb, 



Vocational School 

Evening Vocational School 

Principal, Carter Street School 

Vocational School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Bartlett School 

Asst. Instructor, Vocational School 

Elementary 

Asst. Instructor Vocational School 

Elementary 

Schoolhouse Janitor 

Schoolhouse Janitor 

High School 

Clerk, School Supply Office 

Elementary 

Temporary Military Instructor in 

High School 
Clerk, Vocational School 
Elementary 

Clerk, Attendance Office 
Elementary 
Elementary 

Acting-Principal, Butler School 
School Nurse 
High School 
VocationalSchool 
Acting-Principal, Green School 
Schoolhouse Janitor 
High School 
Vocational School 
High School 
School Physician 
Head of the English Department in 

the High School 
High School 
Vocational School 
Elementary 
Elementary 
Asst. Instructor, Vocational School 



In JHemortam 



Cornelius JF. Callafjan 

Master of the Butler School 

Isabella €♦ ©mall 

Principal of the Carter Street School 

Margaret 3f. Connors 

Teacher in Carter Street School 

S@argerp jf* S^cSgaster 

Teacher in Pawtucket School 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



19 



PUPILS BY GRADES 

The following table shows the number of pupils in the 
schools, according to grades : 



Kindergartens 
Grade 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

" 10 

" 11 

" 12 

11 13 

" 14 



Total 5,811 



vlales 


Females 


Total 


216 


219 


435 


828 


733 


1,561 


710 


653 


1,363 


544 


548 


1,092 


747 


667 


1,414 


507 


582 


1,179 


503 


477 


980 


433 


459 


892 


379 


373 


752 


247 


363 


610 


219 


260 


479 


159 


212 


371 


123 


190 


313 


95 


119 


214 


11 


6 


17 



5,861 



11,672 



HIGH SCHOOL 
The high school graduated a class of 302 in June and there 
w r as an entering class of 538 in September. Of this class 382 
were from public schools, 86 from private schools, 48 from towns 
which have certificate privileges, 6 entered by examination, and 
16 came from out-of-town schools. 

The grammar schools sent 82 per cent, (a considerable in- 
crease over 1917) of their graduates to the high school; the 
average age of the entering class was fourteen years, four 
months. 

The graduation exercises were held in Keith's Theatre on 
June 26th ; the names of the Carney Medal students, and the 
names of the students who were awarded honorable mention are 
here given : 

CARNEY MEDALS 

Albert Lionel Bourgeois 
George Bernstein 



Bridie Mary Sheridan 
Edith Tilton Miles 



Dorothy Wright 



William Lowe Abrams 



20 superintendent's report 

HONORABLE MENTION FOR SCHOLARSHIP 

Ada Lillian Abbott Helen Gertrude Donahue 

Dorothy Marguerite Morris Haze! Julia Palmer 

Lester Ames Sherburne Doris Evon Traver 

HONORABLE MENTION FOR ATTENDANCE 
Katherine Elizabeth Fay Mildred Josephine Holmes 

Muriel Leach George Stephen Mahoney 

Grace Delilah Martin George Leonard Palmgren 



MEDICAL AND DENTAL SUPERVISION 

The health of the children in the public schools is supervised 
by nine physicians and tv/o nurses under the control of the school 
committee. Four additional physicians are employed by the 
Board of Health to supervise the private schools and their names 
and the schools they supervise are given below : 

Dr. F. P. Murphy — Immaculate Conception, St. Peter's School and Or- 
phan Asylum, Sacred Heart, St. Stanislaus. 

Dr. R. C. Stewart — Our Lady of Lourdes, St. Louis's, St. Patrick's for 
Boys, St. Patrick's for Girls. 

Dr. J. N. Drury — Greek Orthodox, St. Michael's, St. Mary's, Mrs. 
Paxson's Private School. 

Dr. R. Migneault — St. Joseph's for Boys, St. Joseph's for Girls, St 
Joseph's Pawtucketville, St. Joseph's Kindergarten. 

The school dental room is in the Worth en Street School, 
located in Worthen Street between Market Street and Broadway; 
this is the sixth year of its operation. The room is open on all 
school days, including days when the storm signal is sounded, 
from nine until twelve in the forenoon; appointments are made 
by the school physician, nurses and teachers and are under the 
supervision of Miss Lantagne, the doctor's assistant. The fol- 
lowing summary of the work done during the year is submitted : 

Number of children receiving treatment 739 

Number of teeth filled 522 

Number of teeth treated 123 

Number of teeth extracted 1,163 

Number of tooth aches treated 363 

Number of children's teeth treated 363 



superintendent's report 21 

SCHOOL NURSING 

Medical inspection of schools began in France about the be- 
ginning of the last century and was introduced into the United 
States in 1894; it was begun in the Lowell schools in 1915. 

The school nursing is in the hands of two graduate nurses 
who divide the schools into two sections ; each nurse has about 
twenty-two schools to visit each week. 

In most of the schools the nurse announces her presence by 
ringing a bell ; in others a note is sent to the teacher to notify 
them of the nurse's arrival. The nurse then visits those rooms 
which require her presence. When the school physician is in the 
school at the time of her visit the nurse assists him in whatever 
work he may have planned. Children who are awaiting re- 
admission to school after absence on account of sickness receive 
attention first and if, in the judgment of the physician, they are 
to be re-admitted they are sent at once to their classrooms. If 
for any reason such children cannot be returned to their class- 
rooms they are sent home with instructions as to the time to re- 
turn; in some cases it will be necessary for the nurse to call at 
their home to give further instructions to the mother. 

Close attention is given those pupils who are referred to the 
physician by the teacher and children who are found to be suffer- 
ing from minor skin diseases and pediculosis are referred to the 
nurses for treatment. 

The school nurse does valuable work in detecting or pre- 
venting contagious diseases and in the correction of physical de- 
fects ; she assists in the education of the children and, sometimes, 
of their parents in the principles of personal and public hygiene. 
She reports suspected contagious diseases and this is very im- 
portant work. 

The school nurses keep careful and complete records of the 
work which is done along their line in the schools and these 
records should be of considerable value in showing at some later 
day what the preliminary work in school nursing was in the city. 



22 superintendent's report 

The sub- joined table will give interesting data concerning 

the work of nurses. 

School visits 1,262 

Pupils inspected (new) 8,122 

Pupils inspected (old) 12,460 

Defects Found 

Defective teeth 3,346 

Defective speech 50 

Defective eyes 121 

Pediculosis (inspected for) 5,221 

Enlarged tonsils 1,223 

Impetigo 135 

Eczema 22 

Excluded to be vaccinated 412 

Organic heart trouble 31 

Unclean 971 

Treatments 

Treatments in schools 1,205 

Tonsils and adenoids (hospital) 65 

Tonsils and adenoids (private) 8 

Consultations with teachers and pupils 8,097 

Dental clinic (new) 246 

Dental clinic (old) 142 

Private dentist 214 

Home visits (new) 239 

Home visits (old) 93 

Hygiene talks and tooth brush drills 588 

Whooping cough (excluded) 35 

Measles 5 

Pupils examined for vacation (country week) 8 

Pupils examined for fresh air room 16 

Transferred to fresh air room 4 

Mention should be made in this place of the closing of the 
schools for a month in the fall term of the year on account of the 
influenza epidemic and most creditable mention should be made 
of the part which* the men and women employed by the school 
department played in connection with that period of sickness. 

Requested by the Board of Health at noon on Sunday to 
arrange for a canvass of the city in order to locate all cases of 
sickness, the teachers met in the forenoon of the following 
Monday and districted the city and proceeded to make a thorough 
and accurate house to house examination of the city. 



superintendent's report 23 

As a result, very full and interesting data were placed at 
the disposal of the Board of Health ; moreover, a surprisingly 
plain proof was given to the public of the efficiency and prompt- 
ness with which a highly organized school department can plan 
and carry through a piece of work of this nature. 



SIGHT AND HEARING TESTS 



High 

Grammar 
Primary 



Pupils 


Defective 


Per Cent. 


Defective 


Per Cent. 


Parents 


Examined 


Sight 


Defective 


Hearing 


Defective 


Notified 


1,394 


73 


.05 


7 


.005 


80 


5,824 


882 


.15 


109 


.02 


612 


4.191 


330 


.08 


75 


.02 


255 



Total 11,409 1,285 .11 191 .016 947 

SCHOOL SAVINGS BANKS 

The statement of the deposits on account of the school sav- 
ings banks for the year 1918 shows only very slight increase over 
the amount for 1917. It is somewhat surprising that any gain 
is shown because there were so many and so varied demands 
made upon the time and resources of the children for other 
causes. 

< j rHnnT Deposits Deposits 

5LHUUL Dec. 31, 1917 Dec. 31, 1918 

Bartlett $ 5,416.36 $ 5,596.67 

Butler 4,639.17 4,216.35 

Colburn 2,318.40 2,692.42 

Edson 2.615.59 2,891.99 

Green 3,276.62 3,134.75 

Greenhalge 4,709.94 4,893.69 

Lincoln 7,759.46 7,773.04 

Moody 5,094.56 4,936.13 

Charles W. Morey 9,013.36 8,829.86 

Pawtucket 7,322.58 7,037.93 

Riverside 1,600.02 1,815.24 

Varnum 6,291.51 6,710.91 

Washington 2,747.68 2,914.08 

Total $62,805.25 $63,443.06 



24 superintendent's report 

MANUAL TRAINING AND COOKING 

The work in cooking and manual training has been making 
very satisfactory progress in the schools. Nearly all of the 
grammar schools are provided with rooms and equipment for 
these branches of the work and, on the whole, the rooms and 
equipment have been provided at a remarkably low cost. 

In spite of the belief in many minds, and this belief generally 
has no reasonable foundation, instruction in manual training and 
cooking is not a fad ; on the contrary, practically all elementary 
schools and most high schools in progressive communities have 
work or courses in manual training and cooking, and it is alto- 
gether likely that in the near future we shall see more rather than 
less of these and similar activities in the work of elementary and 
high schools. 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

The eighth year of the school opened with an enrolment of 
eighty-nine boys and forty-five girls. The only requirement for 
admission to the day classes of the Vocational School, so far as 
age is concerned, is that a pupil must not be less than fourteen 
and not more than twenty-five years of age. 

All pupils must be residents of the state: for pupils who do 
not reside in Lowell there is a tuition charge of $100 payable by 
the city or town of the non-resident pupil, as the school is 
absolutely free to the individual pupil, regardless of his place of 
residence. 

The work is so arranged that a boy may enter at any time 
and may advance as rapidly as his industry and ability will 
allow. 

The school offers preliminary training for boys as carpenters, 
electricians, cabinet-makers, machinists, and automobile repairers. 

The boys are trained mostly on productive work in all de- 
partments and the work is of such a practical nature that they fit 
naturally into the industry in advanced apprenticeship standing. 
Besides the shop work the boys are given English, arithmetic, 
civics and citizenship, and hygiene. 



superintendent's report 25 

A course of practical science is given to the boys in the elec- 
trical, machine and auto repair classes. 

The school for girls is organized for the training of girls 
for the activities and duties of everyday life; the course com- 
prises instruction in housekeeping, dressmaking, millinery and 
power machine work. 

In February, 1916, the girls' school opened the dining rooms 
at the State Normal School and since then has served dinners 
and luncheons to the faculty and students of the school. This 
gives a valuable training in preparing food in large quantities 
and also in serving; the practice proved to be so valuable it 
seemed wise to make it a permanent part of the curriculum. 

The school sent out a class of eleven graduates on June 25, 
1918. 

The State Board of Education exercises a considerable con- 
trol over the school, as the state has agreed to pay half of the 
maintenance expense of the school. In order to secure reim- 
bursement from the state, the courses of study, equipment, build- 
ings, and the work of the teachers must be approved by the 
agents of the State Board of Education. 



PENMANSHIP 

During recent years the work of teaching and supervising 
penmanship in the schools has been more highly systematized and 
considerable attention has been given to the instruction of the 
teachers themselves in penmanship. 

About four years ago, after a rather long period in which 
there was no systematic supervision of penmanship in the schools, 
a beginning of supervision was made by the employment of a 
teacher from the commercial department of the high school for 
three afternoons each week in the grammar grades of the city. 

The employment of this part-time supervisor did little more 
than to show the necessity of and the benefits of a considerable 
amount of supervision in penmanship. 



26 superintendent's report 

For something over a year now three teachers from the 
commercial department of the high school have been employed 
for three afternoons in each week to supervise the work in the 
grammar grades; their supervision has been efficient and is 
relatively very inexpensive and the system they have arranged 
has been regarded by competent penmanship authorities as very 
superior. 

When we shall have arranged for an extension of their work 
into the primary grades and shall have provided pupils with the 
most up-to-date material, we are confident that we shall secure 
results which will compare favorably with the best results secured 
in any other city. 



WAR ACTIVITIES AND MILITARY SERVICE 

Lowell has given many evidences in the past of the patriotic 
spirit and enterprise of her people ; her conduct with respect to 
the great war has been in keeping with her best and noblest 
traditions. 

The school department may be justly proud of the part 
which it has played in the field and at home in the activities of 
the war. First is presented the highly honorable list of those 
who entered the military and naval service of the country. 

Dr. John H. Lambert, 

Captain, Medical Corps, Base Hospital No. 7, A. E. F. 
Mr. John C. Leggat, 

Captain, 104th Inf., attached Headquarters, 52nd Inf. Brigade, 26th 

Division, A. E. F. 
Major Colby T. Kittredge, 

Major, 4th Pioneer Regt., A. E. F. 
Mr. C. Fred Campbell, 

1st Lieutenant, 4th Pioneer Regt., A. E. F. 
Mr. James F. Conway, 

2nd Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U. S. A. 
Mr. Joseph G. Pyne, 

Seaman, Second Class, 1st Naval District. 
Mr. Herbert R. Baker, 

Band Sergeant, 4th Pioneer Regt., A. E. F„ 



superintendent's report 27 

Dr. Nathan Pulsifer, 

Major, Medical Corps., Rcgt. Surgeon, 304th Inf., 85th Division, 

A. E. F. 
Major Walter R. Jeyes, 

Captain, Inf., U. S. A. 
Mr. Leo A. King, 

2nd Lieutenant, Quartermaster Corps, U. S. A. 
Mr. Paul L. Perkins, 

2nd Lieutenant, Aviation Section, Military Aeronautics, Flying Status, 

U. S. A. 
Dr. Edward O. Tabor, 

1st Lieutenant, Medical Corps., U. S. A. 
Marguerite J. O'Dwyer, 

A. N. C, 3rd Army, A. E. F. 
Abigail Bacon, 

Reconstruction Aide, Medical Dept., U. S. A. 

The schools were thoroughly and efficiently organized for 
the work of the Junior Red Cross and the public and private 
schools of Lowell, joined with the schools of all of Northern 
Middlesex, collected large sums of money and materials and did 
a vast amount of work. 

The schools were also thoroughly organized for work in 
connection with the Victory Loan and the Victory Boys and Vic- 
tory Girls made a most creditable showing. 



SCHOOL AND HOME GARDENS 

On account of the somewhat critical food situation growing 
out of the war, the Federal and State authorities took a very 
great interest in the promotion of school and home gardens. 
There had already been in previous years very commendable 
work in and throughout the schools along this line under the 
supervision of Miss Lee. 

Under the special appeal of the President through the 
United States Bureau of Education that every child should have 
a garden the L T nited States school garden army was organized 
and teachers and pupils were inspired to greater efforts in garden 
work. 



28 superintendent's report 

Approximately 5500 children had home gardens last year 
and were enrolled in the United States school garden army. In 
each school a regiment was formed and in every room there was 
a company with a captain and lieutenants. 

To assist in carrying on this work seeds were supplied by 
Hon. John Jacob Rogers, the Board of Trade gave $50 and 
leaflets with simple directions for planting were furnished by the 
school department. 

The economical value of garden work was emphasized in the 
school rooms and became an important factor in the teaching of 
civics. 

It is impossible to give a comprehensive report of the re- 
sults of the labor but from some garden reports which have 
come to hand the following items are worthy of notice. 

From one packet of lettuce seed a second grade boy raised 
one hundred lettuce plants. 

A boy in a grammar school raised three hundred pounds of 
squash from five seeds. 

A boy from another grammar school exhibited a squash that 
weighed sixty pounds. 

The value of vegetables harvested by children in one gram- 
mar school was $1024. 



STATE AGREEMENT AND TRAINING SCHOOLS 

When the State Normal School was established at Lowell in 
1897, an agreement was entered into by the State Board of 
Education and School Committee of Lowell for the proper and 
harmonious direction of certain activities of the schools which 
were of common interest to the state and city. 

In June, 1914, the State Board of Education and the School 
Committee adopted a new agreement which, in their judgment, 
would better serve the needs of the state and provide a practical 
field for the students of the normal schools and would at the 
same time interfere in no way with the purposes and work of the 
public schools. 



superintendent's report 29 

The schools mentioned in the new agreement and known as 
the Training Schools are the Bartlett, the New Moody Street, 
and the Lexington Avenue Schools. 

Just as in the old agreement, teachers and janitors for these 
schools are nominated by the principal of the Normal School 
and elected by the School Committee. The agreement of the 
year 1914 differs mainly from the original agreement in this 
particular, that the expenses of maintaining the training schools, 
not including costs of repairs, medical inspection and attendance 
service, shall be paid for by the Commonwealth and that the city 
of Lowell shall pay annually into the Treasury of the Common- 
wealth in equal quarterly instalments in January, April, June 
and October, a sum of money equal to the product found by 
multiplying the per capita cost of maintenance in the kinder- 
garten and elementary schools for the preceding fiscal year ending 
December 31 by the average membership of the training schools 
for the same year: "cost of maintenance and instruction" shall 
include expenses for everything except repairs, medical inspec- 
tion and service of attendance officers. 

The computation, by which the amount to be paid the state 
for the year 1919 is arrived at, is given below and will perhaps 
make the financial part of the agreement more easily understood. 



Total Expenditure "by the School Committee $573,204.06 

Deduct (Included in 1918 Computation) .... 10,753.75 



$562,450.31 



For the Computation for 1919 
Deduct as follows : 

Vocational School $ 37,706.41 

High School Tuition 68,568.17 

High School Janitors 8,221.19 

High School Bills 21,052.38 

Medical and Dental Supplies 405.33 

Dentist, Assistant, Physicians, Nurses 4,298.50 

Attendance Officers 4,648.83 

Evening School Tuition 9,622.50 

Evening School Janitors 1,421.75 

Evening School Bills 2,914.74 

Repairs (furniture and plumbing) 8,599.06 



30 superintendent's report 

General Repairs 1,587.30 

Electrical Repairs 739.50 

Total $169,785.66 

Cost of Maintenance for State agreement computation $392,664.65 

Average membership in elementary schools, 1918 10,121.00 

Grammar, 5,671 ; Primary, 4,032 ; Kindergarten, 418. 

Average membership in training schools, 1918 877 

Bartlett grammar, 442; Bartlett primary, 224; Bartlett 
kindergarten, 34; New Moody, 138; Lexington Ave., 39. 

$392,664.65 divided by 10,121 equals $38.80, cost per pupil. 
$38.80 multiplied by 877 equals $34,027.60, amount due the 
State for 1919. 



EVENING SCHOOLS 

It can sow be said with absolute truth of the Lowell Evening 
Schools that, so far as organization and the character of the 
teaching force are concerned, they differ in no way from the 
day schools. It was never fair and it never will be fair to have 
it understood that persons may be employed in evening school 
work who would not be employed in the day schools. 

There is a great field for evening school work in Lowell 
today; not simply among the illiterate aliens, for their number 
is constantly decreasing, but among the boys and girls, the young 
men and young women who have gone into employment at an 
early age and without securing the advantages in education which 
the state and the city freely offer them. 

Our evening schools have been maintained on an efficient 
basis now for several years and it is quite generally known that 
we are endeavoring to offer to the youth of the city the best 
which can be offered under the circumstances ; but the response 
has not as yet been nearly what it should be and we can only 
hope that in time a better spirit of ambition will be aroused in 
many boys and girls as well as in parents to spend in profitable 
work in the evening schools at least a portion of the time which 
they are spending in idleness or to their disadvantage. 

All of the principals and teachers of the elementary schools 
are men and women from the day schools and the principal and 
teachers of the high school are teachers from the day high and 



superintendent's report 31 

the day elementary schools with very few exceptions, those ex- 
ceptions existing - only when there are not sufficient day school 
teachers to do the work. 



NATURALIZATION 

When, in June, 1918, a typewritten list of the names of the 
men who attended the naturalization class, together with a state- 
ment as to their attendance at the meetings of the class, was pre- 
sented at the Superior Court during its session for final papers, 
the presiding judge expressed surprise that such a class was 
established and cared for by the school department and he com- 
plimented the school department for its interest in the matter. 

The first sessions of the class were held in December, 1915, 
and the lessons were prepared by the congressman of this district, 
the mayor of the city, and the twelve masters of the city schools. 
For the past two years, however, we have used the course pre- 
pared by the Department of University Extension because it 
covered practically the work which our own lessons covered and, 
being in print, could be placed in the hands of the men who were 
taking the course. 

The work of the class has been greatly appreciated and we 
feel that it is a reasonable and useful extension of the activities 
of the public schools. The purpose of the class is to instruct 
men who are seeking their final papers in the history and insti- 
tutions of the country and to give them free of charge informa- 
tion on all matters which concern naturalization. 



SCHEDULE OF SCHOOL SESSIONS AND VACATIONS 

High School: — 8.25 A. M. to 1.25 P. M. 

Elementary Schools: — 8.30 A. M. to 11.30 A. M. and 1.45 P. M. to 3.45 P. M. 

Middlesex Visage: — 9 A. M. to 12 M. and 1.30 P. M. to 3.30 P. M. 

New Moody Street: — 8.45 A. M. to 11.45 A. M. and 1.45 P. M. to 3.45 P. M. 

Lexington Avenue: — 8.45 A. M. to 11.45 A. M and 1 P. M. to 3 P. M. 

Vocational School, Bovs' : — 8.30 A. M. to 12 M. and 12.30 P M. to 3.30 P. M. 

Vocational School, Girls': — 8.30 A. M. to 12.30 P. M. and 1 P. M. to 3.30 P. M. 

Evening High School : — 7 to 9. 

Evening Vocational Schools: — 7.15 to 9.15. 

Evening Elementary Schools:— -7 to 9. 

VACATIONS 

Summer Vacation — from the Wednesday preceding the last Friday in June to the 

second Monday in September. 
The week which includes Christmas. 
The week beginning with the ninth Monday and the week beginning with the 

eighteenth Monday after the Christmas vacation. 

Hours for ringing the no-school signal: — 7.30 A. M., T2.45 P. M., and 6 P. M. 



32 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



SUMMARY OF EVENING SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 
For Term 1917-1918 



SCHOOLS 





to 








c • 


O 


.3 

to 


n y 




u 


3 


o _ 


to c 

w 5 


S 

CO (LI 


rt 

H 


^ 


r„H 


to 


J£ 


rt «*-i 




c 


u O 


x ° 


iT° 




■SW 




o 


<L> 
> 


s 


j: 


<u 


W 


3 




H 




H 







Whole 
Number 

on 
Registers 





c/) 


(/) 


<u 


OJ 






rt 








fa 



H 



Average 

Number 

Belonging 



fa 



Average 
Attendance 





t/) 


[/} 


<u 


11 






rt 


re 


1) 




fa 



u 



P4 



Minors 

Unable 

to Read 

and Write 

in English 



fa 



High 

Cabot Street 
Colburn . . . 

Edson 

Green 

Greenhalge 

Totals . 



37 


37 


33 


74 


679 


780 


1459 


278 


406 


684 


210 


322 


2 


2 


2 


69 




79 


79 




58 


58 




51 


6 


7 


5 


69 


81 


65 


116 


25 


49 


74 


20 


39 


5 


6 


5 


69 


100 


49 


149 


57 


32 


89 


45 


30 


12 


16 


16 


69 


415 


264 


679 


163 


lh9 


352 


158 


167 


6 


6 
74 


4 
65 


69 


110 

1385 


54 
1291 


164 

2676 


30 
553 


24 
758 


54 
1111 


24 

1452 


20 

629 


68 



532 
51 
59 
75 

320 
44 



1081 



78 




89 




80 


12 


83 


25 


91 


26 


82 


13 


82% 


76 



2 
30 
21 
61 
20 



134 



2 
42 
46 

87 
33 

210 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 



33 



00 

o> 

DC 
< 

UJ 

> 



o 

Ll 

CO 
CC 
LU 
O 

L. 
Ll 
O 

UJ 
O 

Z 

< 

Q 

Z 
UJ 

I- 

< 

LU 

I 

Y- 

u. 

o 

i- 

QC 
O 
Q. 
LU 
CC 



•sja iz o; 91 
panssj 
•5433 itjuoijeonpg J 



•sjX ic 0; 91 
panssj 
•;j33 puoiiuonpg | 



•sjX 91 oj £1 
panssj 
•;j33 ;ii3iuAO{duijj * 



jo uoijnoaso-ij 



uoijEqcuj uo paoBu 



jooipg 

Suiuihjj^ A - } 111103 

x3S3fppij\r atp oj iuag 



p3}S3.Uy 



JOOlJOg JO 



3UI !X V- U MJ. P 3 H S !A 



auijx puooag paiisi^\ 



uo Suuapu'BM. 



siuEnjjL 



saajuasqy 



pa^BSpsaAuj 
S3SE3 aaqiuri^ p3;ox 



co to co co ■<# t^ to ^^(sw 



^(CtOHOt-NXKtCtOTfi 



OiN-<iO»ON©^50CO{NM 
GlG^COCO'^totOtO-^G^COG* 



000000 



O O Gl G> O ^ 



O^HfflTjiH 



OG^ CC^tJ<® 



000000 



CO W ©)> «5 CO 



-3< co ■>* co b- o 

tJ« t— CO CO CO g* 



CO X CO to G) CO 
tO •«■$< iQ iO CO *Q 



O *0 CO X CO CO 
•*f CO CO *o x ■* 



co a co g* b- co 

CO — ■ Gl CO G* — < 



r-i O "* b- O «£• 

b- CO CO X CO b- 
CO Gl CO CO CO ■-! 



u a -. • 
3 v y •-* 



0000 



0000 



O O O rH 



O O O ^h 



0000 



i-H O O G* 



co o to to 



<* CO b- 



tO 1-1 O X 

i-H b- CO 



b- tO "* tJ< 

r-1 UO OS 

1— 1 rj< 1— I 



Gl CO rj< G* 
CO G) CO 
i-H to G* 



u 

cu 

a j> 



u J- jZi 

" e g 



3»iO.^. u k r jj ft v ^ 



un 



b- b- G» 

CO G» fh 

Oi to 
b- 



*T3 cu 

3 ro 



0J 

u 



pa 

ST 

£a* cu 
p to 
o" 

3 co 

'■£ o 0<j=. 



u 3 

.2 rt 

£ .ts 

* -J— 



KJ. CU 



cu "O 

CC ^ 
CJ-. CO 



en ""■>•:-! 

S S 8 

2 s <* 



cu 

u 

c 
*o 



ro 

u 

cu 

£ 
o 



> UJ 



0* 

CO 



ro 

o 

H 



34 superintendent's report 

CONCLUSION 

In the report of a year ago reference was made in this place 
to the terrible war which at that time was completely deranging 
the world. Toward the end of the school year of 1918 the 
November Armistice brought that war practically to an end. 

Our nation, like other nations, learned many lessons during 
those awful days; they saw the weakness of many things which 
they had regarded as strong and as of the utmost importance ; 
they also learned, and to an extent of which they had never 
dreamed, how wonderfully the free institutions and popular edu- 
cation of America had prepared us for the awful burden? and 
responsibilities of war. 

If, during the stress and fearful anxieties of a world-war, 
testimony has been given of the wonderful part which the schools 
have played in the success of the nation at war, surely in the days 
of peace we should come to a greater realization than we had 
ever before of the necessity of fostering and advancing in every 
possible way the education of the youth of the country. 

The best way to prepare a nation and its men and women 
for war is to prepare them as effectively as possible for the ac- 
tivities of peace. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HUGH J. MOLLOY, 

Superintendent. 



Roll of Teachers 

Giving name, subjects cr grade taught and residence 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Kirk and Anne Streets 

Herbert U. Bixby, Head-Master 19 Rutland St $3 

Frederick R. Woodward, Sub-Master, Head Dept. Mathematics, 80 Georgia Ave. 2 

Fred Albinson, Bookkeeping 8 Newbury St 1 

Jennie L. Allen, Physics 947 Middlesex St. ... 1 

Alice H. Bacheller, Typewriting, Com. Law, Com. Arithmetic, 21 Huntington St. 1 

Adelaide Baker, Head of Department of French 136 Myrtle St 1 

Orton E. Beach, Stenography and Office Practice 858 Chelmsford St. .. 1 

Emma L. Bradley, French 484 Westford St 1 

Elmer G. Brennon, Geometry 97 Georgia Ave 1 

*C. Fred Campbell, Manual Training 89 Georgia Ave 1 

Marietta Cassidy, Latin \ Fifth Ave., 1 

M. Mabel Cassidy, English and French 44 B St r 

Albert W. Chilson, Manual Training Y. M. C. A 1 

Ethel V. Cleaves, Physical Instructor 30 Hanks St 1 

Alice L. Cluin, Latin and Algebra 130 Fort Hill Ave. .. 

James F. Conway, Chemistry 115 Nesmith St 1 

Grace D. Donovan, History and English 256 Branch St 1 

Ruth L. Eaton, Assistant to Principal 59 Pine St 1 

Esther Elliott, Algebra and Latin 25 Fairview St 

Edith C. Erskine, Botany, German, History and English 25 Clark Road 

Ethel M. Everett, Algebra and Greek History 617 Westford St 1 

Bertha W. Ferguson. Bookkeeping 100 Myrtle St 1 

Florence R. Foote, French, History and English 28 Wannalancit St. .. 1 

Grace M. Goodhue, Latin and History 120 School St 1 

Peter J. Gulesian, Manual Training 29 Whitney Ave. ... 1 

E. Irene Hogan, Algebra 117 Clark Road 

Bessie E. Huntoon, Physiology and French 64 Warwick St 1 

Elizabeth Irish, Algebra and English n Willow St 

Mary C. Joyce, Elocution 82 Eleventh St 1 

Mary H. Killpartrick, History, English, and Com. Geography, 27 Maryland Ave. 1 
Genieve E. Lawrence, Algebra and Com. Geography ...53 Berkeley Ave. ... 

Frances R. H. Leggat, Physical Instructor 640 Broadway ...... 

Albert D. Mack, Head of Commercial Department 17 Summit St 2 

Mary L. Martin, English, Latin and History 39 Durant St 1 

Frances U. Masterson, History and English 352 Christian St 1 

II. Estelle Moors, Algebra and English 104 Moore St 

Elizabeth H. Murphy, French, Com. Law, and Com. Arithmetic, 159 White St. 1 

John D. McKinley, Latin and German 474 Beacon St 1 

Loretta A. McManmon, Algebra and English Dracut, Mass 

Ellen E. McOuade, History, English and German 318 Andover St 1 

Flora A. Owen, Stenography, Typewriting and Bookkeeping, 42 Huntington St. 1 

Joseph G. Pyne, Qreek History, English and Physiology 823 Central St 1 

Mary E. Ouirbach. English and Algebra 50 Highland St 1 

Gertrude A. Rodliff, English Chelmsford Centre . . 1 

Ida L. Samuels, Stenography and Bookkeeping 56 Fifth Ave 1 

John J. Savage, Greek, History, English, Physiology, 34 Benton Rd., Somerville 1 

Ruth L. Sawyer, English and Algebra 169 Fairmount St. 

Charles E. Seede, Manual Training 88 Warwick St 1 

Millie A. Severance, Physics, History, and English ....302 Stevens St 1 

James A. Shanley, Bookkeeping 364 Lawrence St. ... 1 

Margaret V. Spear, French 576 Westford St 1 

Mary G. Stevens, History and English 126 Fort Hill Ave. . . 1 



000 
600 
800 
380 
380 
380 
610 
380 
900 
100 
380 
080 
300 
080 
960 
700 
265 
080 
960 
960 
380 
380 
150 
380 
610 
780 
380 
780 
080 
380 
960 
840 
170 
080 
080 
960 
380 
080 
960 
080 

150 
400 
080 
380 
*5o 
300 
840 
800 
150 
700 
380 
380 



36 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



Alice O. Stickney, Astronomy, Geology, Latin, and English, 599 School St. 

Violet Stocks, College Mathematics and Geometry 141 Parkview Ave. 

Morton A. Sturtevant, Head of Department of English .143 Clark Road .. 

Edward J. Thompson, Spanish Chelmsford Centre 

Mary E Tobin, Algebra, Com. Law, and Arithmetic ....52 Highland St. .. 
Susie L. D. Watson, American History, and Geometry ..390 E. Merrimack 

*Nathan Pulsifer, M. D., Medical Director 473 Beacon St. .. 

*Major Colby T. Kittredge, Military Instructor 48 South Walker St. 

Bernard F. McArdle, Military Instructor 35 Thirteenth St. 

*In Military Service 



St 



1,150 

1,080 

1,800 

1,380 

i)i5o 

1,380 

200 

500 

500 



Janitors 

Michael H. Lvnch 10 Orford St. 

^Herbert R. Baker 9 Shedd St. 

Arthur H. Dana 73 Fletcher St. 

Michael H. Finnegan, Temporary 141 Fayette St. 

William M ack 37 May St. 

Bernard H. Maguire 55 Grove St. 

John J. Moran 43 Anderson St. 

Charles E. Thornton 47 Loring St. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 

BARTLETT SCHOOL 

Wannalancit Street 



Charlotte M. Murkland, 
Sara E Ames, gr. 9, 8, 7 
Belle F. Batchelder. gr. 
Kathleen E. Driscoll, gr. 
Katherine F. Farley, gr. 
Eleanor J. LeLacheur, g 
E. Belle Perham, gr. 4 . 
Belle A. Prescott, gr. 9, 
Maria W. Roberts, gr. 5 
Charles E. Seede, gr. 9, 
M. Beatrice Shea, gr. 9, 
Celia Standish. gr. 9, 8, 
A. Gertrude Stiles, gr. 6 
Alice O. Sunbury, gr. 9, 
Amy L. Tucke, gr. 9, 8, 



(Normal Training School) 

Principal 179 Pine St 

, History, Civics, and Sewing ..418 Walker St. .. 

6 66 Arlington St. . 

9, 8, 7, Geography 47 Grace St 

5 Lowell, R. F. D. 3 

. 4 128 Fourth Ave. . 

100 Riverside St. . 

8, 7, Literature 68 Mt. Washington 

and 4 571 Westford St. . 

8, 7, Manual Training 88 Warwick St. .. 

8, 7, Office and Penmanship ..267 Walker St. .. 

7, Composition and Music ....96 Grove St 

2 Prescott St. , Cambridge 

8, 7, Gram., Domestic Science 179 Pine St 

7, Algebra, Arithmetic, Music .111 Butterfield St. 



St 



)2,I0O 
1,150 
1,140 
I,o8o 
1,140 
I,o8o 
1,140 
1,150 
1,140 
450 
900 
I,o8o 
1,140 
1,150 
1. 1 50 



Janitors 

William J. Hunt 3 Fourth St. 

Thomas F. Hannafin 15 Sargent St. 



BUTLER SCHOOL 

Gorham Street 

Nellie F. Murphy, gr. 9, Acting Principal 85 Sherman St. 

Delia T. Bradv, gr. 7 183 Chapel St. . 

Helen L. Clark, gr. 6 220 High St. . . 

Marguerite .1. Cronin, gr. 9 228 Plain St. . . 

Mary E. Crowley, gr. 5 90^ Gorham St. 

M arv L. Crowley, gr. 6 438 Westford St. 

Annie T. Devine, gr. 7 1 =14 Carlisle St. 

Peter J. Gulesian, Manual Training 18 Wildwood St., Chelmsfo 

"Margaret G. Hvde, gr. 4 900 Central St. . . 

Katherine E. Kelley. gr. 7 74 Gates St 

Alary E. Lane, gr. 8, Domestic Science 14 Ellsworth St. . 

N*ary L. McSorley, gr. 5 40 Huntington St. 

** Alice F. Morrill, gr. 4 32 June St 



; 1,380 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 

400 
1,080 
1,080 
1,180 
1,080 

000 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 37 

Alice C. O'Brien, gr. 5 300 Wilder St 1,080 

*Mary G. Quinn, gr. 4 • . . .28 Chapel St 1,080 

Sadie E. Tully, gr. 8 1 1 1 Westford St. . . . 1,080 

Janitors 

Terrence F. Casey 163 Howard 

Thomas M. Keegan 22 Ellsworth St. 

*Room in Carter St. School. 
Room in Weed St. School. 



- - 



COLBURN SCHOOL 
Lawrence Street, near Charles 

Helen M. Shean, Principal 260 High Street , $1,380 

Anna .T. Cawley, gr. 8 85 Rogers St 900 

Lena Collins, gr. 7 1 106 Mammoth Rd 900 

Sadie A. Connor, gr. 4 73 Pleasant St 900 

Elizabeth A. Conway, gr. 5 219 Church St 900 

Caroline A. Downing, gr. 5 56 Huntington St 900 

Julia M. Driscoll, gr. 6 47 Grace St 900 

Margaret C. Fox, gr. 9 8 Eddy St 1,080 

Louise C. Thomas, gr. 4 85 Eleventh St 900 

Janitors 

Michael Finnegan (On Leave of Absence) 235 Stackpole St. 
Patrick J. Mahoney (Temp. Assignment) 16 Lyons St. 



EDSON SCHOOL 

Highland Street 

*Leo A. King, Master 4 Astor St $1,600 

Frances M. Webster, gr. 9, Acting Prin. . 45 Yarney St 1,080 

Susan F. Burbank, gr. 6 Chelmsford Centre 960 

Mary F. Concannon, gr. 9 204 Pleasant St 600 

Anna E. Donovan, gr. 7 and 8 26 Madison St 1,080 

Marianna L. Donovan, gr. 5, Domestic 

Science 256 Branch St 1,000 

Kate J. Hayes, gr. 6 t 15 Floyd St 1,080 

Delia C. Maloney, gr. 5 70 Elm St 1,080 

Helen L. Mansfield, gr. 4 12 White St 600 

Margie F. Marren, gr. 7 86 Rolfe St 1 ,080 

Anna T. McCarron, gr.' 4 228 High St 1,060 

Marietta E. O'Neil, gr. 8 11 Carter Ave 900 

Janitors 

John H. Condon 96 Midland St. 

William P. Black 900 Central St. 

*Absent on Military Service 



GREEN SCHOOL 

Merrimack Street 

Paul L. Perkins, Master 240 Jewett St $1,600 

Hannah M. Barrows, gr. 8 19 Newhall St 1,080 

Agnes T. Courtney, gr. 5 11 Marsh St 1,080 

Carrie E. Erskine, Special 74 Fort Hill Ave 1^080 

Jennie E. Fay, gr. 6 115 Stackpole St 1,080 

Mary V. Johnson, gr. 4 183 Wilder St 1,080 

Jane T. Johnson, Special 184 Baldwin St 600 

Katherine F. McCarthy, gr. 5 647 Market St 1 ,080 

M. Alice McCue, gr. 6 ^36 Rogers St 900 

Lizzie A. Xolan, gr. 7 210 Pawtucket St 1,080 

Katherine C. O'Neill. Special 175 Walker St 900 

Elizabeth Provencher, gr. 9 22 West Bowers St 1,080 

A. Lillian Walsh, gr. 4, Domestic Science 14s Mammoth Rd 880 

Janitors 

Oscar W. Brown 35 Livingston Ave. 

William S. McKenzie, Jr 87 Gershom Ave. 



38 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

GREENHALGE SCHOOL 

Ennell Street, Centralville 

Arthur K. Whitcomb, Master 2 Belmont St $2420 

Mary Alice Cochrane, gr. 7 230 Cabot St 900 

Mary M. Cowell, gr. 7 22 London St 780 

Josephine S. Dunlavy, gr. 5 76 Canton St. 1,080 

Esther G. Donlon, gr. 9 756 Westford St 1,180 

Alice L. Joyce, gr. 6 82 Eleventh St 780 

Helen Kohawn, gr. 4 63 Thirteenth St 1 ,080 

Alice A. Masterson, gr. 5 35 Oak St 1,080 

Annie L. Mahoney, gr. 4 22 Burlington Ave 1,080 

Ellen T. Muldoon, gr. 8 998 Lakeview Ave 900 

Leona M. Small, gr. 6 46 Whitney Ave 900 

Janitors 

John Barrett 19 Burnside St. 

David E. Cornock 848 Bridge St. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN SCHOOL 

Chelmsford Street 

James L. Mellen, Master 74 Pentucket Ave $2420 

Margaret T. Donovan, gr. 6 42 Claire St 900 

Mabel W. Ewings, gr. 5 3 Astor St 1,080 

Ellen L. Floyd, gr. 4 124 Stevens St 1,080 

Irma V. Hodgman, gr. 632 Westford St 1,080 

Margaret S. Jamieson, gr. 5 37 Viola St 1,080 

Margaret G. McDonald, gr. 6 397 Broadway 1,080 

Elsie M. Puffer, gr. 4 942 Middlesex St 1,080 

Julia G. Slattery, gr. 4 122 Hoyt Ave 900 

Margaret M. .Sparks, gr. 9 169 Fort Hill Ave 1,080 

Bride T. Sweeney, gr. 7 138 Pleasant St 1,080 

Sadie A. Taff, gr. 8 235 Stackpole St 660 

Janitors 

Edward Cullen 9 Auburn St. 

Thomas Ouinn 30 Weed St. 



MOODY SCHOOL 
High and Rogers Streets 

William S. Greene, Master 302 Nesmith St $2420 

Katharine F. Baker, gr. 8 665 Andover St 900 

Mary F. Carolan, gr. 9 256 Concord St 780 

Frances E. Garrity, gr. 5 74 Stevens St 1,080 

Frances E. Hardman, gr. 5 18 Astor St 1,080 

Fannie G. Hobbs, gr. 4 74 Fort Hill Ave 960 

Mae Hogan, gr. 6 82 Varney St 780 

Cora E. Jones, gr. 4 62 Huntington St 960 

Frances C. Noonan, gr. 6 115 Pleasant St 780 

Celia B. Wood, gr. 7 92 Fort Hill Ave 660 

Janitors 

Dennis A. Harrington 495 High St. 

John O'Connor 102 Pleasant St. 



CHARLES W. MOREY SCHOOL 
Pine and Wilder Streets 

William W. Dennett, Master 400 Stevens St $2,200 

Lillian E. Alister, gr. 5 71 Wedge St 900 

Leonora K. Battles, gr. 8 21 Chester St 1,080 

Ella M. Breen, gr. 6 17 Florence Ave 1,080 

Anna A. Burnham, gr. 7 14 Belmont St 1,080 

Anna T. Coffey, gr. 8 189 Wilder St 960 

Annie V. Donoghue, gr. 9 11 Wesley St 1,080 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 39 

Mary F. Foss, gr. 9, Domestic Science, gr. 

8 and Chelmsford Centre 1,180 

.Hazel A. Gardner, gr. 4 and 5 15 Columbus Ave 660 

Minnie C. Gray, gr. 6 106 Liberty St 1,080 

C. Ethel Hale, gr. 7 15 Robbins St 1,080 

Charlotte E. Parsons, gr. 4 485 Westford St 960 

Grace Scribner, gr. 4 70 Tyler Park 1,080 

Lulu Turner, gr. 5 33 Warwick St 1,080 

Katharine M. Usher, gr. 6 and 7 32 South Walker St 1,080 

"Grace F. Ward, gr. 5 438 Westford St 1,080 

Estelle L. Whitney, gr. 9 13 Oakland St 1,080 

*Room in the Franklin School 

Janitors 

Elmer E. Harder 30 Pine St. 

Harrison L. M organ 29 C St. 



PAWTUCKET SCHOOL 
Mammoth Road, Pawtucketville 

William P. Barry, Master 1280 Middlesex St $2420 

Delia F. Briscoe, gr. 8 Dracut, R. F. D. No. 3 900 

Corinna G. Cover, gr. 4 12 Lombard St 1,080 

Clotilda A. Delaney, gr. 4 82 Colonial Ave 960 

Alice G. Donohoe, gr. 5 50 Linden St 900 

Goldie M. Gardner, gr. 5 15 Columbus Ave 1,080 

Loretta M. Kinsela, gr. 6 and 7 50 B St. 780 

Alice H. Lynch, gr. 7 137 Riverside St 900 

Anna L. McNabb, gr. 7 and 8 63 Dunfey St 780 

Julia B. Riordan, gr. 9, Domestic Science 27 Woodward Ave 1,180 

Charlotte C. Walsh, gr. 6 85 Eleventh St 1,080 

Janitors 

James S. Somerset 104 Woodward Ave. 

John Roarke 9 Sixth Ave. 



RIVERSIDE SCHOOL 
Woburn Street, Wigginville 

Rosalie T. Burns, Prin., gr. 8 and 9 39 Whitehead Ave $1280 

Elizabeth A. Gilinson, gr. 5 3 Bourne St 960 

Christine M. Kane, gr. 4 339 High St 1,080 

Harriet L. Wheeler, gr. 6 and 7 64 Morton 1,080 

Janitor 
John H. D. Toy 7 Nelson Ave. 



VARNUM SCHOOL 
Myrtle Street, Ccntralville 

Henry H. Harris, Master 93 Eleventh St $2420 

Florence E. Archibald, gr. 5 198 Third St 900 

Agnes Bailey, gr. 9 Majestic Chambers 1,080 

Ellen L. Daley, gr. 7 239 Stevens St 780 

Rose A. Dowd, gr. 6 127 Beacon St 1.080 

Agnes T. Fay, gr. 6 123 Third St 1,080 

Mary A. Fay, gr. 6 123 Third St 1 ,080 

Grace E. Frye, gr. 8, Domestic Science ..93 Vernon St 1,060 

Ruth F. Hathaway, gr. 4 106 Durant St 660 

Ada A. Hoole, gr. 4 101 Myrtle St 1,080 

Margaret F. Howe, gr. 5 308 South St 1,080 

Alice R. Keese, gr. 5 89 Georgia Ave 1,080 

Elizabeth C. Kennedy, gr. 9 223 Pine St 1,080 



40 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

Mary R. Seery, gr. 7 127 Beacon St 900 

Grace M. Thurber, gr. 7 42 Mansur St 960 

Julia M. Williams, gr. 4 156 Sixth St 1,080 

Janitors 

Adam McElroy 670 Bridge St. 

John H. Nolan 65 Fulton St. 



WASHINGTON SCHOOL 
Lang Street, near Inland 

John E. Barr, Master, Literature 168 Sixth St $2,420 

Carrie L. Brown, gr. 4 18 Bourne St 900 

Helen A. Dow, gr. 8, 9, Algebra, Grammar 149 B St 1,080 

Rose C. Geary, gr. 8 and 9. History and 

Penmanship 49 Whipple St 900 

Laura F. Greene, gr. 5 179 Warwick St 900 

Gertrude T. Keyes, gr. 6, 7, Geography . . 62 Pine St 900 

Myrtle M. Killpartrick, gr. 4, Cooking ...27 Maryland Ave 1,000 

Alice G. McGilly, gr. 7 and 6, History ...75 Hoyt Ave 900 

Olive J. Palm, gr. 7 and 6, Literature and 

Grammar 806 Stevens St 900 

Esther A. Sanders, gr. 5 and 4 79 Methuen St 780 

Janitors 

David H. Angluin 27 Crowley St. 

Timothy Moynahan 38 Whipple St. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

The grammar school to which each primary belongs is indicated in parenthesis. 

AGAWAM STREET (Butler) 
Agawam and Barrington Streets 

Mary A. Fay, Principal, gr. 3 and 2 115 Stackpole St $1,130 

Anna M. Higgins, gr. 3, 2, 1 North Billerica 1,010 

Janitor 
John H. Hallett 17 London St. 



AMES STREET (Colburn) 
Lawrence and Ames Streets 

Rose E. MacVay, Principal, gr. 2 46 Linden St. $1,130 

Julia C. O'Sullivan, gr. 1 105 Mt. Washington St 780 

Mary C. Timmons, gr. 3 326 Concord St 1,080 

Janitor 
John T. McCarty ^ 9 Puffer Ave. 



BARTLETT 
(In Bartlett School) 



Louise F. Mahoney, gr. 2 (Temporary 

Assignment) 550 Westford St $ 550 

Regina B. Frappier, gr. 1 26 Hampshire St 900 

Essie E. Roche, gr. 3 and 2 . .' 1835 Middlesex St 1.140 

Mary E. Snow, gr. 1 89 School St 1,140 

Mary F. Wallace, gr. 3 76 Walker St 850 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 41 

BILLINGS STREET (Greenhalge. 

Annie M. Robbins, Principal, gr. 3 and 2 .116 Highland St $1,130 

Elizabeth H. Seede, gr. 2 and 1 88 Warwick St 1,080 

Janitor 
James Hounsell 704 Bridge St. 



CABOT STREET (Green) 

Mary T. Whelley, Prin., gr. 3 254 Parkview Ave $1,130 

Loretta A. Hannafin, gr. 2 15 .Sargent St 960 

Ellen F. Lynch, Special 137 Riverside St 960 

Mary J. Murphy, gr. 1 34 Butterfield St 1,080 

Janitor 
Thomas A. Green 512 Gorham St. 



CARTER STREET (Butler) 

Katherine F. Brady, Principal, gr. 1 173 Chapel St $1,130 

Henrietta I. Grady, gr. 2 39 Lundberg St 780 

Helen R. Halloran, gr. 3 546 E. Merrimack St 780 

Janitor 

John Cochran, (Temporary) 10 rear 90 Appleton St. 

Provisional Appointment 



CENTRAL STREET (Colburn) 

Elizabeth G. Lawler, Principal, gr. 3, 2 ..260 High St $1,130 

Helen A. Drury, gr. 2 and 1 29 Princeton St 1,080 

Janitor 
William P. Black 900 Central St. 



CHARLES STREET (Edson) 

Alice T. Owens, Prin., gr. 3 4 Belmont St $1,130 

Ella E. Gardner, gr. 2 and 1 366 Walker St 1,080 

Marietta G. Gormley, gr. 2 22. Lyon St 1,080 

Margaret A. Harrahan, gr. 1 ...114 Bellevue St 1,080 

Janitor 
James F. Leary 249 E. Merrimack St. 



COLBURN (Coiburn) 
Charles Street, near Lawrence 

Anna M. Courtney, Principal, gr. 3 404 Fletcher St $1,130 

Elizabeth R. Connell, gr. 1 19 Fort Hill Ave 900 

Mary A. Hartley, Special 51 Pine St 1,080 

Katherine M. Tobin, gr. 2 and 1 52 Highland St 960 

Janitor 
John Scott 2z Meadowcroft St. 



42 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

CROSS STREET (Bartlett) 

Cross St., between Fletcher and Mt. Vernon Streets 

Ida J. Clarke, Principal, gr. 3 q6 Grove St $1,130 

Anna T. Coburn, gr. 2 39 Arlington St 1,080. 

Katherine Kelley, gr. 1 434 Fletcher St 1,080 

Janitor 
Wlliam Kennedy 73 Fletcher St. 



DOVER STREET (Morey) 
Dover Street, between Middlesex and Grove Streets 

Clara B. Home, Principal, gr. 3 106 Chestnut St $1,130 

Clementine H. Bowers, gr. 2 60 Loring St 1,080 

Bertha Gardner, gr. 1 32 Robbins St 1,080 

Janitor 
Frank J. Burch 24 So. Canton St. 



ELIOT (Edson) 
Favor and Summer Streets 

Ellen A. Stillings, Principal, gr. 2 and 1 .24 Bellevue St $1,130 

Ellen A. Corbett, gr. 3 32 Highland St 1,080- 

Loyola McCann, gr. 1 17 Wentworth Ave 1,080 

Nellie T. O'Grady, gr. 2 625 Central St 1,080 

Janitor 
Charles J. McCabe 318 High St. 



FRANKLIN (Morey) 
Branch and Middlesex Streets 

Kate G. Jones, Principal, gr. 1 240 Jewett St $1,130' 

Ethel H. Chalifoux, gr. 2 157 Mt. Vernon St 780 

Mary E. Richardson, gr. 3 55 Victoria St 960 

Janitor 
Joseph Provost 54 Queen St. 



GRAND STREET (Lincoln) 

Marion E. Greene, Principal, gr. 3 405 Westford St $1,130 

Jennie M. Bennett, gr. 2 81 Gates St 1,080 

*Mary J. Moynahan, gr. 1 28 Windsor St 900^ 

*Room in Howard Street School. 

Janitor 
Ernest McGowan 21 Coburn St. 



GREENHALGE 
(In Greenhalge School) 

Ruth Crowell, gr. 1 69 F'ort Hill Ave $ 900 

Mary G. Dudley, gr. 2 126 Coburn St 600 

Blanche E. Marshall, gr. 1 445 Merrimack St 1,080 

Martha Rogers, gr. 3 131 Cumberland Rd 1,080- 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 43 

KIRK STREET (Green) 

Kirk and Lee Streets 

Eliza A. Davis, Principal, gr. 3, 2, 1 Billerica, P. O. Box 147 $1,130 

Janitor 1 1 

John J. Manchester 66 Willow St 



LAKEVIEW AVENUE (Greenhalge) 
Lakeview Avenue 

Margaret J. McCluskey, Principal, gr. 3.-246 Methuen St $1,130 

Anna F. Joyce, gr. 1 82 Eleventh St 1,080 

Katherine P. O'Brian, gr. 2 28 West Adams St 900 

Janitor 
Joseph Naphon 39 West St. 



LAURA LEE (Washington) 
Plain and Powell Streets 

Flora H. Sprague, Principal, gr. 3 1 10 Branch St $1,180 

Sara M. Dean, gr. 1 244 Parker St 1,080 

Emma M. Graham, gr. 1 419 Chelmsford St 900 

Lena M. Robinson, gr. 3, 2 68 South Walker St 1,080 

Lilla M. Stanley, gr. 2 2 Horn St 1,080 

Janitor 
William J. Hunt 17 A St. 



LEXINGTON AVENUE (Bartlett) 

"Carrie M. Hart, Principal, gr. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 $1,140 

Janitor 
Timothy F. Rohan 65 Claire St. 



LONDON STREET (Butler) 
London and West Streets 

Elizabeth R. Maguire, Principal, gr. 3 ...53 Nesmith St $1,130 

Margaret L. Haggerty, gr. 2, 1 17 Bellevue St 1,080 

*Mary F. Hill, gr. 2, 1 Chelmsford St., Chelmsford, Mass. . 1,080 

*Room in West London Street School 

Janitor 
Peter J. Hunt 59 Madison St. 



LYON STREET (Butler) 
Lyon and Central Streets 

Kate F. Murphy, Prin., gr. 3 and 2 870 Gorham St $1,130 

"Gertrude A. Hessian, gr. 2 and 1 134 Pleasant St 660 

Mary J. McCarry, gr. 2 and 1 1600 Gorham St 1,080 

Janitor 
Michael Finnegan 235 Stackpole St. 



44 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

MIDDLESEX VILLAGE (Morey) 

Middlesex and Cornell Streets 

Harriet F. Wakefield, Principal, gr. 6, 5 .79 Stevens St $1,130 

Gertrude E. Dane,Jk 2 and 1 22^ Gibson St 1,080 

Mary J. Reardon,'^W4 and 3 16 Marginal St 780 

Janitor 
P. Henry Driscoll 16 Edwards St. 



NEW MOODY STREET (Bartlett) 

New Moody Street 

Addie B. Merrill, Prin., gr. 3 465 Bridge St $1,250 

Anna I. Cassidy, gr. 1 4 Fifth Ave 1,140 

Grace C. Delany, gr. 2 82 Colonial Ave 1,140 

*Maud M. Hardy, gr. 1 Chelmsford, R. F. D. No i, Box 11A 1,140 

"Room in Pawtucket School 

Janitor 
Thomas J. McGee 199 Mt. Hope St. 



PAWTUCKET PRIMARY 

(In Pawtucket Primary) 

Eugenia L. Hogan, gr. 3 and 2 106 Avon St $1,080 

Alberta M. McQuesten, gr. 2, 1 118 D St $ 600 



PINE STREET (Morey) 

Pine and Gibson Streets 

Carrie J. Bailey, Principal, gr. 3 56 Loring $1,130 

Helen D. Swain, gr. 1 _.4i8 Walker St 1,080 

Grace 1. Washburn, gr. 2 390 Wilder St 1,080 

Janitor 
Joseph M. Hunt 169 Broadway 



POND STREET (Moody) 

Pond and High Streets, Belvidere 

Adelaide Crowley, Principal, gr. 2, 1 115 Fort Hill Ave $1,130 

*Maud E. Green, gr. 1 238 E. Merrimack St 1,080 

Mary I. Halloran, gr. 2 546 E. Merrimack St 1,080 

** Alice E. Ramsay, gr. 3 124 Third St 1,080 

"■Room in High Street School 
**Room in .Moody School 

Janitor 
Timothy F. Flarrington 156 Andover St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 45 

POWELL STREET (Morey) 

Powell Street, near Liberty 

Viola A. ITamblett, Principal, gr. 2, 1 ...58 Bellevue St $1,130 

Ellen J. Piper, gr. 3 and 2 55 Norcross St 1,080 

Janitor 

George A. Tobin, Temporary 797 Merrimack St. 

(Provisional Appointment) 



RIVERSIDE 

(In Riverside School) 

Charlotte O. Lowe, gr. 2, 1 North Chelmsford $ 960 

Etta M. Smith, gr. 3 and 2 1 1 18 Lawrence St 1,080 



SYCAMORE STREET (Moody) 

Sycamore Street 

Florence E. Rowell, Principal, gr. 3, 2 ...65 Huntington St $1,130 

Elizabeth B. Dame, gr. 2 and 1 178 First St 1,130 

Janitor 
John J. Conway 38 Laurel St. 



TENTH STREET (Varnum) 

Cor. Tenth and Varnum Streets 

Mary F. Beane, Prin., gr. 3 212 Tenth St $1,130 

Alice M. French, gr. 1 21 May St 960 

Alice A. Holtham, gr. 2 and 1 1 107 Bridge St 1,080 

Fannie H. Murphy, gr. 2 42 Twelfth St 1,080 

Janitor 
Winfield S. Cross 55 Seventh St. 



WASHINGTON 

(In Washington School) 

Clara M. Everett, gr. 1 75 Beacon St $1,080 

Annie E. Irving, gr. 3 and 2 ,_, 28 Walnut St 1,080 

Gertrude B. McQuade, gr. 2 and 1 ....:. 225 Summer St 900 



W T EED STREET (Butler) 

Lilla M. McEvoy, Principal, gr. 3, 2 ....210 Pawtucket St $ 1,130 

gr. 8. 

Janitor 
John N. Palm 369 Lawrence St. 



46 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

WEST SIXTH STREET (Varnum) 
West Sixth Street, between Coburn and Jewett Streets, Centralville 

Stella J. Allen, Principal, gr. 3 115 Third St $1,130 

Elizabeth F. Lamere, gr. 2 63 Canton St 1,080 

Mabel A. Metcalf, gr. 2 and 1 93 Vernon St 1,080 

Laura H. Palmer, gr. 1 78 Hildreth St 1,080 

Janitor 
Patrick J. Clark 199 Pleasant St. 



WORTHEN STREET (Green) 
Worthen Street, between Market and Broadway 

Esther V. Green, Prin., gr. 2 434 Westford St $1,130 

Mary R. Marren, gr. 3 86 Rolfe St 1,080 

Mary E. Meehan, gr. 1 228 Worthen St $ 1,080 

Janitor 
John J. Manchester 66 Willow St. 



KINDERGARTENS 



AGAWAM STREET 
(In Agawam Street Primary) 

Sarah G. Sparks, Principal 59 Elm St $ 840 



BARTLETT 

(In Cross Street Primary) 

Helen W. Noyes, Principal 102 Butman Road $ 840 

Alta L. DeMallie 22 Parkview Ave 650 



CENTRAL STREET 
(In Central Street Primary) 

Katherine C. Early, Principal 256 E. Merrimack St 840 



CHARLES STREET 
(In Colburn Primary) 

Mabel D. Nickerson, Principal 125 Clark Road $ 840 

S. Alice Knapp 305 E. Merrimack St 780 



DOVER STREET 
(In Dover Street Primary) 

Elizabeth A. Wilson, Principal 15 South Canton St $ 840 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 47 

FRANKLIN 
(In Franklin Primary) 

N. Grace Taylor, Principal n Ware St $ 840 

Helen S. Livingston 39 Garden Road 780 



HOWARD STREET 
(In Howard Street Primary) 

Gertrude A. Roberts, Principal Chelmsford, Mass., P. O. Box No. 61 $ 840 

Hortense M. Lamere 13 Ralph St 650 



LAKEVTEW AVENUE 
(In Lakeview Avenue Primary) 

Ella M. Penn, Principal 31 Sanders Ave $ 840 

Celina L. Lalime 28 Flemmings St 720- 



LAURA LEE 
(In Laura Lee Primary) 

Katharine M. Crowley, Principal 115 Fort Hill Ave $ 840 

Doris Childs 256 Gibson St 60O' 



MOODY 
(In High Street Primary) 

Marietta King, Principal 20s Stackpole St $ 840 

Gertrude B. Crowley 115 Fort Hill Ave. .' 780 



PAWTUCKET 
Mammoth Road 



Hortense Tabor, Principal 83 Riverside St $ 840 

^Abigail Bacon Bedford, Massu, 660 

* Absent on Military Service 

Janitor 
Timothy Rohan 65 Claire St. 



PINE STREET 
(In Pine Street Primary) 

Louie I. Smith, Principal 19 Holden St $ 840 



VARNl'M 
(In Varnum School) 



Edith A. Howitt, Principal 52 Myrtle St $ 840^ 

Marion Simpson 67 Methuen St 660 



48 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

WEED STREET 

(In Weed Street Primary) 

Alice F. Seeton, Principal 159 Mammoth Rd $ 840 

Evelyn L. Staples 52 Princeton St 600 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 



Mann School Building, Broadway 

Principal 

Thomas F. Fisher, Principal 121 Livingston Ave $2,500 

Assistant to Principal 
Margaret E. McCann 196 Aiken Ave 

Instructor of Machine Shop Practice 
Theodore S. Archibald 198 Third St 1,400 

Head of Machine Department, and Teacher of Shop Science 
Maurice A. Butterfield 12 June St 1,900 

Instructor in General and Related Subjects 
James F. Peebles 65 Freemont St., Winthrop, Mass. . . 1,500 

Instructor in Electrical Department 
Ernest A. Shafter 373 Beacon St 1,400 

Instructor in Machine Shop Department 
Charles J. Welsh 77 Billings St 1,500 

Head of Woodworking Department 
Fred F. Wiggin Chelmsford, Mass 1,600 

Janitor 
George Daley • 98 Walker St. 



GIRLS' DEPARTMENT 

Morrill School Building 

Department Head 

Esther M. Downing, 434 Westford St $1,280 

Head Teacher of Housekeeping Department 
Ruberta M. Bramhall 84 Tenth St 1,140 

Teacher of Dressmaking and Millinery 
Mary H. Mehan ^.40 Sixth St 960 

Head Teacher of Dressmaking 
Anna M. O'Day 599 Central St 1,020 

Teacher of Cooking 
Ruth UJpton 63 Mt. Vernon St 900 

Janitor 
Theodore Towner 13 Third St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 49 

SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Musical Director 

Frederick O. Blunt 14 Bellevue St $1,610 

Assistant in Music 
Jessie M. Hagar 418 Walker St $1,150 

Supervisors of Drawing 

Addie E. Edwards Majestic Chambers £1,150 

Helene R. Abels 43 Nicollet St $1,080 

Teachers of Sewing 

Ida J. Flint, Teacher of Sewing 200 Liberty St $1,140 

Esther M,. Owens A .4 Belmont St $ 960 

Agnes R. Burns X2j Lakeview Ave $ 900 

Grace E. Stevens Chelmsford, Mass $ 840 

Manual Training 

Ralph A. Luce Chelmsford, Mass., R. F. D. No. 1 . .$1,610 

Arthur Lundwall 9 Osgood Ave $1,200 

Supervisors of Penmanship 

Fred Albinson 8 Newbury St $ 300 

Albert D. Mack 17 Summit St $ 300 

James A. Shanley 364 Lawrence St $ 300 

Dental Clinic 
(In Worthen Street School) 
Dr. E. A. Kent 11 Harris Ave $ 800 

Assistant to Dentist 
Eva M. Lantagne 14 Albion St $ 400 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Giving Names of Schools Supervised 

C. Stoyle Baker, M. D 4 Bond St. 

Colburn Gr., Colburn Pri., Edson, Ames St., Central St. 

John F. Boyle, M. D. '. 32 Whipple St. 

Butler, Lyon St., Carter St., Weed St., London St. 

James J. Cassidy, M. D in Riverside St. 

Green, Charles St., Worthen St., Kirk St., Cabot St., Vocational — Boys' Dept. 

Winifred M. Wools-Devine, M. D 27 Parkview Ave. 

Pawtucket, Greenhalge, Lakeview Ave., New Moody St., Lexington Ave. 

George O. Lavallee, M. D 790 Merrimack St. 

Varnum, Billings St., West Sixth St., Tenth St. 

Joseph A. Mehan, M. D 4 Park St. 

Bartlett, Franklin, Cross St., Vocational — Girls' Dept. 
Charles M. Roughan, M. D. 105 Merrill Ave. 

Moody, Riverside, Pond St., Agawam St., Sycamore St. 

Emma Young Slaughter, M. D 545 School St. 

Morey, Washington, Powell St., Middlesex Village, Dover St., Pine St. 

Forster H. Smith, M. D. _ qo^ Putnam Ave. 

Lincoln, Laura Lee, Grand St., Eliot 



SCHOOL NURSES 

Anna C. O'Dwyer 148 Midland St $ 840 

Marietta M. Dwyer 23 Sidney St $ 840 

* Marguerite J. O'Dwyer 

* Absent on Military Service 



50 ROLL OF TEACHERS 

ABSENT ON LEAVE 

*Herbert R. Baker, Tanitor. *Leo A. King, Master of Edson School. 

*C. Fred Campbell, High School. *Major Colby T. Kittredge, Military 

Bethia S. Keith, Lincoln School. Instructor. 

* Abigail Bacon, Pawtucket Kindergarten. Ouennie A. Manchester, High School. 

*Marguerite J. O'Dwyer, School Nurse. *Nathan Pulsifer, M. D., Medical Director. 

*On Military Service. z Edward O. Tabor, M. D., School Physician? 

PERMANENT SUBSTITUTES 

Sara D. Ivers, East Chelmsford, Mass. A. Gertrude Ready, 87 Fulton St. 

Dorothy F. Riordan, 8 Suttle Ave. Mary T. Jones, 168 Sixth St. 

Lettie R. McMaster, 56 Rolfe St. Harriet L. McAloon, 112 Sixth St. 

Helen Madeline Sullivan, 250 Rogers St. Louise F. Mahoney, 550 Westford St. 

Catherine T. Gillick, 998 Lakeview Ave. Nelle D. Horner, 353 Westford St. 

Substitute 
Sarah Swan Griffin, 121 South Walker St. 



EVENING SCHOOLS 



Henry H. Harris, Principal 93 Eleventh St. 

E. Helen Rivet, Principal's Assistant 271 Beacon St. 

Alice H. Bacheller 21 Huntington St. 

Typewriting 

Orton E. Beach 858 Chelmsford St. 

Stenography III 

Albertine Bernier 91 West Sixth St. 

Stenography III 

Elmer G. Brennon 97 Georgia Ave. 

Commercial Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry 

M. Mabel Cassidy 44 B St. 

Spelling, General and American History 

Josephine A. Charbonneau 218 Riverside St. 

Stenography I 

Albert W. Chilson Y. M. C. A. 

Manual Training 

Alice L. Cluin 130 Fort Hill Ave. 

Elementary Grammar 

Grace D. Donovan 256 Branch St. 

Grammar 

Ruth L. Eaton 59 Pine St. 

Typewriting I 

Peter J. Gulesian 59 Berkeley Ave. 

Manual Training 

Elizabeth Irish 11 Willow St. 

Latin and Spelling 

Elizabeth C. Kennedy 223 Pine St. 

Penmanship 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 51 

Raymond J. Kenney i West View St. 

Stenography 

Mary H. Killpartrick 27 Maryland Ave. 

Commercial Geography, Spelling, Civil Government 

Charles A. King 4 Astor St. 

Bookkeeping 1 

Sara Laporte , 76 June St. 

French 

Mildred E. Leeds 184 First St. 

Stenography 

Albert D. Mack 17 Summit St. 

Bookkeeping III 
Head of Commercial Department 

John D. McKinley 474 Beacon St. 

Advanced Arithmetic 

Loretta A. McManmon 57 Second Ave. 

Arithmetic 

Adelaide E. Noyes 126 Fort Hill Ave. 

Elocution 

Flora A. Owen 42 Huntington St. 

Stenography II 

Ruth L. Sawyer 169 Fairmount St. 

Arithmetic 

Charles E. Seede 88 Warwick St. 

Manual Training 

Margaret L. Seeton 12 Third Ave. 

Stenography II 

James A. Shanley 364 Lawrence St. 

Bookkeeping 

M. Beatrice Shea 267 Walker St. 

Penmanship 

Mary G. Stevens 126 F'ort Hill Ave. 

Civil Service and Literature 

Alice O. Stickney 599 School St. 

Rhetoric and Graduation English 

Morten A. Sturtevant , 143 Clark Road 

Commercial Correspondence 

Sadie A. Taff 235 Stackpole St. 

Penmanship 

Edward J. Thompson Chelmsford Centre 

Physics, Chemistry and Spanish 

Mary E. Tobin 52 Highland St. 

Grammar 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

EDSON 

Leo A. King, Principal (On Leave) 4 Astor St. 

Helen M. Shean, Acting-Principal 260 High St. 

Marguerite J. Cronin 228 Plain St. 

Marietta G. Gormley 22 Lyon St. 

Mary E. Lane 14 Ellsworth St. 

Delia C. Maloney 70 Elm St. 

Sadie E. Tully ..105 Westford St. 



52 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



GREEN 



Paul L. Perkins, Principal 240 Jewett St. 

Esther G. Donlan 756 "Westford St. 

Helen A. Dow 149 B St. 

Agnes T. Fa}' 123 Third St. 

Maiy A. Fay 123 Third St. 

Margaret C. Fox 8 Eddy St. 

Mary V. Johnson 183 Wilder St. 

Marietta King 205 Stackpole St. 

Elizabeth G. Lawler 260 High St. 

Margie F. Marren 86 Rolfe St. 

Mary R. Marren 86 Rolfe St. 

Alice A. Masterson 35 Oak St. 

Elizabeth Provencher 22 West Bowers St. 

Rooms in Cabot Street School 
(For Girls Only) 

Rose A. Dowd 127 Beacon St. 

Maud E. Green 238 E. Merrimack St. 



GREENHALGE 



William W. Dennett. Principal 400 Stevens St. 

Addie B. Merrill 465 Bridge St. 

Annie M. Robbins 116 Highland Ave. 

Martha Rogers 131 Cumberland Road 



EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

Men's Department 

George H. Dozois 11 Spaulding St. 

Alvah Tavlor 41 So. Walker St. 

Fred F. Wiggin Chelmsford 

Chester W. MacDonald 22 Bellevue St. 

Edwin Wells 178 Perry St. 

Maurice A. Butterfield 12 Tune St. 

Theodore S. Archibald 198 Third St. 

Carl A. Bishop 3 Blodgett St. 

Charles F. Welsh 77 Billings St. 

Guy Whitnev 132 B St. 

Edward W. Bean 486 Wilder St. 

Michael F. Donahue 381 Dutton St. 

John H. McGninness 682 Broadway 

Girls' Department 

Esther M. Downing, Department Head 434 Westford St. 

Ruberta M. Bramhall, Department Head 84 Tenth St. 

Anna W. Dennett 55 Eighteenth St. 

Katherine Humphrey 156 Tenth St. 

Elizabeth Regan 282 Concord St. 

Modwena Rowlandson , 136 Parkview Ave. 

Harriet Sturtevant , 34 Nesmith St. 

Ruth Upton 63 Mt. Vernon St. 

Anna M. O'Day, Department Head 599 Central St. 

Margaret McGurn no So. Walker St. 

Orina B. Mongrain 1056 Bridge St. 

Nellie Rourke 33 Marion St. 

TTclen Rouse 201 Summer St. 

Elzina Secord 11 Bond St. 

Rose Ward 635 Broadway 

Agnes R. Burns 427 Lakeview Ave. 

Agnes Me.Moon 78 Mt. Washington St. 

Katherine Brosnan 178 Perry St. 

Marv N. Devine 231 School St. 

Mary H. Mehan 40 Sixth St. 

Helen F. O'Rourke (Temporary) .154 Shaw St. 



SALARY SCHEDULE 53 



SALARY SCHEDULE 
In effect from January 1, 1919. 

High School 

Head Master $3,300 

Sub-Master 2,600 

Men Teachers $1,080 to 1,870 

(First year $1080; second year, $1210; third year, $1340; fourth year, 
$1470; fifth year, $1600; sixth year, $1730; seventh year, $1870; depart- 
ment head, $100 in excess of schedule salary.) 
Women Teachers $780 to $1380 

(First year, $780; second year, $880; third year, $980; fourth year, 
$1080; fifth year, $1180; sixth year, $1280; seventh year, $1380.) 



Elementary Schools 

Masters (with yearly increase of $100) $1320 to $2420 

Teachers 600 to 1080 

(First year, $600 ; second year, $680 ; third year, $760 ; fourth year, 
$840; fifth year, $920; sixth year, $1000; seventh year, $1080.) 



Principals of Primary Schools 

$50 in addition to regular grade salary. 



Kindergartens 

Principals $840 

Assistants $600 to $780 

•(First year, $600; second year, $660; third year, $720; fourth year, 
$780.) 

Temporary Teachers 

Men, per day $3.00 

Women, per day 3.00 

Kindergartens, per day 2.00 

Special Teachers 

Drawing $1080 to $1150 

Music 1150 to 1610 

Sewing 840 to 1140 



54 



TEACHERS CERTIFICATES 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

(Granted Since January 1, 1918) 

First Grade 

John J. Savage, Harvard, 1915. Boston College, 1909 Lowell, Mass. 

Morton A. Sturtevant, Tufts College, 1899 Lowell, Mass. 



Second Grade 

Helen E. M. Choate, Boston University, 1918 
Frances W. Dillon, Trinity College, 1918 



Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 



Mary F. Concannon 
Hazel A. Gardner 
Alice F. Morrill 
Gertrude Weinbeck 



Third Grade 



Alice F. 



Mary G. Dudley 
Ellen T. Muldoon 
Margery E. McMaster 
Celia B. Wood 
Seeton 



Fourth Grade 

Mildred H. Crockett, Lesley Kindergarten, '18 
Anna M. Ford, Miss Neil's Normal Training, '18 
Henrietta Livingstone, Wheelock Kindergarten, '17 
Gladys T. Parsons, Leslie Kindergarten, '18 



Manchester, N. H. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Roxbury, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



55 



Authorized Text Books 

For 

High and Elementary Schools 



Adopted by the School Committee of 
Lowell, Massachusetts, June, 1913 

HIGH SCHOOL 

ENGLISH 



Rhetoric 

Enlarged Practice Book 

The Odyssey 

Buehler 

Tales from Shakespeare 

Last of the Mohicans 

House of Seven Gables 

Twice Told Tales 

Iliad 

Iliad 

Silas Marner 

Julius Caesar 

Merchant of Venice 

Macbeth 

Lady of the Lake 

Ivanhoe 

Life of Johnson 

Sir Roger De Coverley 

L'Allegro and II Penseroso 



Adopted 
Brooks & Hubbard 
Hitchcock 
Church 
Gray 
Lamb 
Cooper 
Hawthorne 
Hawthorne 
Pope 
Bryant 
Eliot 

Shakespeare 
Shakespeare 
Shakespeare 
Scott 
Scott 
Macaulay 
Addison & Steele 
Milton 



Speech on Conciliation with America Burke 



Idylls of the King 
Vision of Sir Launfal 
Ancient Mariner 
Chaucer to Arnold 
Essays of Elia 
Tales of a Wayside Inn 
Grandmother's Story 



Tennyson 

Lowell 

Coleridge 

George 

Lamb 

Longfellow 

Holmes 



American Book Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Sibley & Ducker 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 
Ginn & Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
American Book Co. 
Longmans, Green 
and Ginn & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 



Rhetoric 

Handbook of Composition 

Exercises in English 

Students' Hist, of English Literature 

Introduction to English Literature 

Self-Cultivation in EnglisJi 

Life of Goldsmith 

Tales of a Traveler 

Palamon and Arcite 

Sohrab and Rustum 

Prologue to the Canterbury Tales 

Essays on Clive and Hastings 



Supplementary 

Shackford-Judson 

Woolley 

Strang 

Simonds 

Pancoast 

Palmer 

Irving 

Irving 

Dryden 

Arnold 

Chaucer 

Macaulay 



Sanborn <S: Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Ginn & Co. 

Longmans, Green & Co. 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn- 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Ginn & Co. 



56 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



Washington's Farewell Address 

Autobiography of Benj. Franklin 

Selected Essays 

She Stoops to Conquer 

Twelfth Night 

King Lear 

Coriolanus 

Henry Fifth 

Midsummer Night's Dream 

New Practice Book 

High School English 

Business English 

Rhetoric 

Selections from Lincoln 

Life of Johnson 

Pilgrim's Progress 

Birds & Bees 
Tale of Two Cities 
American Poems 
Vicar of Wakefield 

Sketch Book 

Selected Ballads and Lyrics 

Leaflets 

Old Testament Narratives 

Odyssey 

Poems and Tales 

Marmion 

Kenilworth 

Woodstock 

Guy Mannering 

As You Like It 

Othello 

Tempest 

Treasure Island 

Princess 

Essay on Burns 

History of the Plague 

Paradise Lost 

Golden Treasury 

Life of Nelson 

Forum of Democracy 

Short Stories 

Short Stories 

Flight of a Tartar Tribe 



French Dictionary 

F'rench Grammar 

French Reader 

French Composition 

French Syntax and Composition 

Contes et Legendes 

Sight Reading 



F'oster 


Houghton, Mifflin Co. 




American Book Co. 


Emerson 


American Book Co. 


Goldsmith 


Houghton, Mifflin Co. 


Shakespeare 


Houghton, Mifflin Co. 


Shakespeare 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Shakespeare 


Ginn & Co. 


Shakespeare 


Houghton, Mifflin Co. 


Shakespeare 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Hitchcock 


Henry Holt & Co. 


Brubacher & Snyder Chas. E. Merrill Co. 


Davis & Lingham 


Ginn & Co. 


Scott & Denny 


Allyn & Bacon 


Beave 


Chas. E. Merrill Co. 


Boswell 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Bunyan 


Ginn & Co. 
American Book Co. 


Burroughs 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Dickens 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Gaston 


Chas. E: Merrill Co. 


Goldsmith 


American Book Co. 


Irving 


Allyn & Bacon 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Lodge 


^Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Lowell 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Nettleton 


Henry Holt & Co. 


Palmer 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Poe 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Scott 


American Book Co. 


Scott 


A. L. Burt 


Scott 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Scott 


Ginn & Co. 


Shakespeare 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Shakespeare 


American Book Co. 


Shakespeare 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


Stevenson 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Tennyson 


B. H. Sanborn & Co. 


Carlyle 


B. H. Sanborn & Co. 


Defoe 


Longmans, Green & Co. 


Milton 


B. H. Sanborn £■ Co. 


Palgrave 


Ginn & Co. 


Southey 


Longmans, Green & Co 


Watkins 


Allyn & Bacon 


Moulton 


MacMillan & Co. 


Hart & Perry 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co 


DeQuincey 


B. H. Sanborn & Co. 


FRENCH 




Adopted 






D. C. Heath & Co. 


Fraser & Squair 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Super 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Grandgent 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Bouvet 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Guerber 


American Book Co. 


Rogers 


American Book Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



57 



La Chute 

French Lyrics 

Exercises for Composition 

Scenes de la Revolution Francaise 

Fables 

Douze Contes Nouveaux 

French Grammar 

La Tache du Petit Pierre 

Selected Stories 

Mademoiselle de la Seigliere 

Readings from French History 

French Composition 

Grammaire Francaise 

French Reader 

Le Dix-Septieme Siecle 

Simple French 

La Grammaire 

Intermediate French 

Colomba 

Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon 
Complete Course 
Shorter Course 

Le Tour de la France 
par deux Enfants 

Contes et Legendes, II 

Commercial French Reader 

Drames et Comedies 

Le Premier Livre 

La Belle France 

Les Oberle 

Historical French Reader 

French Newspaper Reader 

La Poudre aux Yeux 

Contes Choisis 

La France qui travaille 



French Grammar 



Supplementary 

Hugo 

Bowen 

Grandgent & Kimball 

Lamartine 

La Fontaine 

Fontaine 

Worman 

Mai ret 

Daudet 

Sandeau 

Super 

Blouet 

Larive et Fleury 

Kuhns 

Duval & Williams 

Francois & Giroux 

Labiche 

Jacques 

Merimee 

Labiche et Martin 

Fraser & Squair 

Bruno 
Guerber 



Meras 
M on vert 
Bazin 



Labiche & Martin 
Bazin 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
Schoenhof 
Schoenhof 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Pitman 

American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
Henry Holt & Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 



German Dictionary 
Prose Composition 
German Lessons 
German Composition 
Wilhelm Tell 
Immensee 



GERMAN 

Adopted 
Heath 

Harris 

Harris 

Wesselhoeft 

Schiller 

Storm 



D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 



Supplementary 

Words of Frequent Occurrence Bierwirth 

Zerbrochener Krug Zschokke 

Composition Fasnacht 

Der Neffe als Onkel Schiller 

L'Arrabbiata Heyse 

Zwischen Himmel und Erde Ludwig 

Das Edle Blut Wildenbruch 



Henry Holt & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
American Book Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 



58 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



Der Schwiegersohn 

Der Stumme Ratsherr 

Composition 

Das Spielmannskind 



Baumbach 
Riehl 
Pope 
Riehl 



Henry Holt & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 



Plane Geometry 
Secondary Algebra 
Essentials of Algebra 
Elementary Algebra 
Trigonometry 
Elementary Algebra 
Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry 
Plane Trigonometry 



Plane Geometry 
McCurdy Exercises 
Essentials of Plane Geometry 
Essentials of Solid Geometry 
First Course in Algebra 
Exercises in Algebra 
Supplementary 
Review of Algebra 
Algebra Exercises 
Plane Geometry (Review) 
Exercises in Alg. & Geom. 



MATHEMATICS 






Adopted 






Wentworth & Smith 


Ginn & Co. 




Wells 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


Wells 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


Wentworth 


Ginn & Co. 




Wentworth 


Ginn & Co. 




Wells 






Wentworth & Smith 


Ginn & Co. 




Wentworth & Smith 


Ginn & Co. 




Wentworth 


Ginn & Co. 




Supplementary 






Schultz & Sevenoak 


The Macmillan 


Co. 


McCurdy 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


Wells 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


Well? 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


Wells 


D. C. Heath & 


Co. 


McCurdy 






Rivenburg 






Robbins 






MacGibbon 


Sibley 




Hale 


Heath 





First Greek Book 
Xenophon's Anabasis 
Greek Grammar 
Greek-English Lexicon 
Odyssey, Books I — VI 
Greek Prose Composition 



GREEK 

Adopted 
White 

Goodwin & White 
Goodwin 
Liddell & Scott 
Perrin & Seymour 
Pearson 



Ginn 6c Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
American Book Co. 



Xenophon's Hellenica, I-IV 
Iliad, Books I-VI 
Herodotus, Vol. II 



Supplementary 
Manatt 
Seymour 
Dietsch 



Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Teubner Edition, 
Leipsic, Germany 



Latin Grammar 

Cicero 

Virgil 

Latin Prose Composition 

New Method for Caesar 



LATIN 

Adopted 
Allen & Greenough 
Allen & Greenough 
Allen & Kittredge 
Daniell-Brown 
Potter 



Ginn & Co. 

Ginn & Co. 

Ginn & Co. 

B. H. Sanborn & Co. 

B. H. Sanborn & Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



59 



Cicero Texts 

Virgil Texts 

Caesar Texts 

Sallust Texts 

First Book in Latin (Adopted) 

Caesar 

Ovid 

Nepos 

Latin Composition 

A Year in Latin 



Supplementary 



Inglis & Prettyman 

Allen & Greenough 

Allen & Greenough 

Barss 

Baker & Inglis 

W. A. Montgomery 



American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
(iinn & Co. 
MacMillan Co. 
American Book Co. 
Row, Peterson & Co. 



Modern Illustrative Bookkeeping 

Seventy Lessons in Spelling 

Modern Business Penmanship 

Commercial Law 

Commercial Arithmetic 

Mental Arithmetic 

Mental Arithmetic 

Commercial Geography 

Gregg Shorthand 

Rational Typewriting 

French Commercial Reader 



Com. and Industrial Geography 

Words 

Zaner Method Manual 

Speed Studies 

Graded Readings in Gregg Shorthand 

Progressive Exercises 

Practical Drills in Shorthand Penmanship 

Advanced Practice in Gregg Shorthand 



COMMERCIAL 

Adopted 
Williams & Rogers 
Williams & Rogers 
Mills 
Gano 
Moore 
Thurston 
Thompson 
Adams 



Supplementary 
Keller & Bishop 



American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
D. Appleton Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Isaac Pitman Sons 

Ginn & Co. 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
Zaner & Bloser Co. 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
Gregg Pub. Cc. 



Worman's First Spanish Book 
Worman's Second Spanish Book 
Elementary Spanish Grammar 
Lecturas Faciles 
Poco a Poco 

Spanish Tales for Beginners 
Cuentos Modernos 
Spanish Dictionary 



SPANISH 



Espinosa & Allen 

Wilkins 

Hall 

Hills 

Johnson 

Appleton 



American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Silver, Burdett & Company 
World Book Co. 
Henry Holt Co. 
American Book Co. 
Appleton Pub. Co. 



HISTORY 

Adopted 

History of the United States Fiske 

Brief History of the United States McMaster 

.Short History of Ancient Times Myers 

History of the Ancient World Botsford 

Roman History Morey 

Leading Facts of English History Montgomery 



Ireland's Story 



Johnston & Spencer 



Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
The MacMillan Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. 



60 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



American History- 
History of the United States 
The Ancient World 
A History of Greek Art 
Greek Literature 
A Short History of England 
History of the American Nation 
Readings in History of the Nation 
Short History of the U. S. 
Gov't of N. E. States 
Manual of the Constitution 
Civil Government 
New Civics 

A Short History of England 
Ancient History 

Supplementary 
Greek Leaders 



Supplemental 

Muzzey 

Adams & Trent 

West 

Tarbell 

Jebb 

Andrews 

McLaughlin 

McLaughlin 

Bassett 

Butler 

Andrew 

Martin 

Ashley 

Andrews 

Webster 

Hopkinson 



Ginn & Co. 

Allyn & Bacon 

Allyn & Bacon 

The Macmillan Co. 

American Book Co. 

Allyn & Bacon 

Appleton 

Appleton 

Macmillan Co. 

Scribner 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

Macmdlan Co. 

Allyn & Bacon 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

Houghfeon, Mifflin Co. 



CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS AND OTHER SCIENCES 



Descriptive Chemistry 

Qualitative Analysis 

A Text Book of Physics 

First Principles of Physics 

Field, Forest & Garden Botany 

Outlines of Botany 

Plant Studies 

Plant Study 

Practical Physiology 

Human Body 

Lessons in Astronomy 

Text Book of Geology 



Adopted 

Newell 

Irish 

Hall & Bergen 

Carhart & Chute 

Gray 

Leavitt 

Coulter 

Meier 

Blaisdell 

Martin 

Young 

Brigham 



Supplementary 

Applied Physics Hawkins 

Advanced Physiology and Hygiene Conn & Budington 
General Chemistry Newell 

Practical Physics Black & Davis 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
American Book Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. 

Longmans, Green & Co. 
Silver Burdett & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
Macmillan Co. 



BOOKS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Adopted June, 1913 



Algebra 
Wentworth's First Steps Ginn & Co. 

Arithmetics 

Morey Elementary, Part I Scribner's Sons 

Morey Elementary, Part II Scribner's Sons 

Morey Advanced Scribner's Sons 

Werner Mental American Book Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 61 



Dictionaries 

Worcester Primary J. B. Lippincott Co. 

Worcester Comprehensive J. B. Lippincott Co. 

Geographies 

Frye's F'irst Steps in Geography Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Leading Facts of Geography, Part I Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Leading Facts of Geography, Part II Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Grammar School Geography Ginn & Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book I The Macmillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II The Macmillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book I, Part I The Macmillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book I, Part II The Macmillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II, Part I The Macmillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II, Part II The Macmillan Co. 

Geographical Readers 

Carpenter's Africa American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Asia American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Australia American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Europe American Book Co. 

Carpenter's North America American Book Co. 

Carpenter's South America American Book Co. 

Window's The Earth and Its People D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's The United States D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Our American Neighbors D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Europe D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Distant Countries D. C. Heath & Co. 

McDonald & Dalrymple's Little People Everywhere: 

Betty in Canada Little, Brown & Co. 

Manuel in Mexico Little, Brown & Co. 

Ume San in Japan Little, Brown & Co. 

Rafael in Italy Little, Brown & Co. 

Kathleen in Ireland Little, Brown & Co. 

Fritz in Germany .- Little, Brown & Co. 

Gerda in Sweden Little, Brown & Co. 

Boris in Russia Little, Brown & Co. 

Donald in Scotland Little, Brown & Co. 

Marta in Holland Little, Brown & Co. 

Hassan in Egypt Little, Brown & Co. 

Josefa in Spain Little, Brown & Co. 

Histories 

Gordy's American Scribner's Sons 

Montgomery's Leading Facts Ginn & Co. 

Scudder's American American Book Co. 

Dickson's American The Macmillan Co. 

Tappan's Our Country's Story Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Tappan's England's Story Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Davis's History of the U.S. for Youngest Readers Ed. Pub. Co. 

Wilson's Reader The Macmillan Co. 

Historical Readers 

Guerber's Stories of the English American Book Co. 

Guerber's Stories of the Greeks American Book Co. 



62 AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 

Language and Grammar 

Mother Tongue, Books I and II Ginn & Co. 

Metcalf & Rafter Series, Books I and II American Book Co. 

Aldine Language Newson & Co. 

Music Readers 

Harmonic Series American Book Co. 

Johnson's Songs of the Nation (Sets of 50) Silver, Burdett & Co. 



Spellers 

Chancellor's Graded City The Macmillan Co. 

Reed's Word Lessons C. E. Merrill Co. 



Physiology 

Gulick Series, Good Health Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Emergencies Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Town and City Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Body at Work Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Control of the Body and Mind Ginn & Co. 

Readers 

The Aldine Series Newson & Co. 

Baker & Carpenter The Macmillan Co. 

Cyr Ginn & Co. 

Gordon D. C. Heath & Co. 

Jones Ginn & Co. 

Art Literature Atkinson, Mentzer Co. 

Howe Scribner's Sons 

Wheeler W. H. Wheeler & Co. 

Williams Choice Literature American Book Co. 

The Hiawatha Primer Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

The Wide Awake Series Little, Brown & Co. 

Child Life Series The Macmillan Co. 

Heath D. C. Heath & Co. 

The Riverside Readers Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Free & Treadwell's Reading Literature, I and II Row, Peterson & Co. 

The Haliburton Readers, I and II D. C. Heath & Co. 

Progressive Road to Reading, I and II Silver, Burdett & Co. 

(1) Blaisdell's Boy Blue and His Friends Little, Brown & Co. 

(2) BlaisdeH's Polly and Dolly Little, Brown & Co. 

(3) Blaisdell's Cherry Tree Children Little, Brown & Co. 

(4) Bingham's Merry Animal Tales Little, Brown & Co. 

(5) Bryce's F'ables from Afar Newson & Co. 

(6) Bryce's That's Why Stories Newson & Co. 

(7) Bryce's Short Stories for Little Folks Newson & Co. 

(8) Smith's Four Footed Friends 

The eight books numbered above are to be furnished for first, second and third 
grades in sets of not more than twenty-five. 

General Literature 

Sewell's Black Beauty Ed. Pub. Co. 

Defoe's Robinson Crusoe American Book Co. 

Masterpieces of American Literature Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Hawthorne's Wonder Book Houghton, Mifflin Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 63- 

Scudder's Fables and Folk Stories Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Hale's A Man Without a Country (Sets of 50) 

Brook's Story of the Old Bay State (Set of 4), Grade 9 .American Book Co. 

Coe's Founders of Our Country (Set of 4), Grade 5 .... 

Lucia's Story of American Discoverers for Little Ameri- 
cans (Set of 4), Grade 4 American Book Co. 

Stevenson's Children's Classics (Set of 10) : 

Book I for Grade 3 Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Book II for Grade 4 Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Book III for Grades 5 and 6 Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Desk Books for Teachers 

Hart's Source Readers in American History The Macmillan Co. 

Page's American Poets Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Hazard's Three Years With the Poets Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Johnston's Ireland's Story Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Ashley's Government and Citizen The Macmillan Co. 

Writing 
Gilman System Dutton & Co. 

TEXT BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIST 

1914 
Standard Reference Work. 
Funk and Wagnalls Dictionaries. 

1915 

O'Shea & Kellog Health Series, published by Macmillan Co. 
Business English by Davis & Lingham, published by Ginn & Co. 
Office Training for Stenographers — Gregg. 
Standard Dictionary of Facts. 

1916 
Williams & Rogers, Beldings Correspondence — American Book Co. 
Young & F'ields Readers — -Ginn & Co. 
Golden Rule Series — Macmillan Co. 
Story Hour Readers — American Book Co. 
See & Say Phonics — Iroquois Publishing Co. 
Brigham & McFarlane, Essentials of Geography — American Book Co. 

1917 
Oral and Written English by Potter, Jeschke and Gillett, published by Ginn & Co. 
To take the place of Mother Tongue. 

Emerson and Bender. Grammar for optional use in ninth grades. 

Spellers- — -Mastery of words, by Sarah Louise Arnold, published by Iroquois Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Spellers — Graded School Speller, by Spaulding & Miller, published by Ginn & Co. 
These spellers to replace, as spellers are needed, the Reed and the Chancellor 
spellers which are now in use. 

Readers : Everyday Classics by Baker and Thorndike, published by Macmillan Co. 

The Merrill Readers by Dyer and Brady, published by Charles E. Merrill Company. 

The Elson Readers, by Elson Keck, published by Scott, Foreman & Co. 

The Lippincott Readers, by Homer P. Lewis, published by J. B. Lippincott Company. 

The Twins Series, by Lucy Fitch Perkins, published by Houghton, Mifflin Company. 

Bunny Rabbits Diary by Blaisdell, published by Little Brown & Co. 

Pretty Polly Flinders by Blaisdell, published by Little, Brown & Co. 

Old Mother West Wind by Burgess, published by Little, Brown & Co. 



64 AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 

For the Desk: — 

Arlo by Cobb, published by the Riverside Press. 

For the Children's Hour, by Bailey, published by Milton, Bradley Co. 
Keep Well Stories by Jones, published by J. P. Lippincott C». 
Wonderland Stories by Lewis, published by J. P. Lippincott Co. 
The Travels of Birds by Chapman, published by D. Appleton & Co. 

i§i8 
Hart's School History of the United States. 
Powell's The Spirit of Democracy. 
Watkin's The Forum of Democracy. 
Brubacher & Snyder* — High School English, Book I. 



< 

UJ 

> 
Ul 

I 

H 

cc 
o 

Ll 

-I 
-I 
Ul 

o 

-I 

u. 
o 



00 



DC 
LU 

co 

UJ 

o 

LU 



> 


n 


1- 




^ 


o 


o 


z 


UJ 

I 
1- 


o 

z 
o 


u. 


_l 


o 


UJ 


CO 


CD 


-1 


CO 


o 


-J 


o 

I 
o 


Q. 

D 


CO 


LL 


o 


U. 


-J 


o 


CD 


a 


D 


LU 


0. 


CQ 


UJ 


2 


I 


D 


H 


Z 


u. 


I 


o 


1- 


CO 

z 


£ 


a: 


„ 


D 


00 


J- 


O 


UJ 


T- 


fiC 


.. 




o 


-1 


CO 


< 


III 


D 


z 


Z 


-) 


Z 


~5 


< 


o 


UJ 


z 


I 


Q 

z 


u. 


111 


o 




> 




cc 




< 




2 




2 




3 




to 





SLUOOi 3S3qj 

ui sSuijjis jo sieas jo *o^ 



asn jE[n&3j 

Ul SUIOOJ-SSBp JO - O^J 



30UBpU31}B JO -;U3D J3J 



speaa 3LUES jo sfooijos 
ojiqnd jaqjo oi iuas -o^ 



apuj3 jaqiiiq jo s[ooqos 
3;iqnd aaipo oi iuas -ojvi 



»pBi3 3U1ES jo siooqos 
oijqnd jaqjo uiojj p ( 03J - o^ 



apej3 aaMOj jo s[ooips 
oijqnd jsqio uiojj p,09J 'Oj^ 



(ooips o;iqnd jaqio Xue 

UIOJJ P.33J lOU p^U3 -QJvJ 



bo B 
rt >^ rt 

v « c 



I B »oj, 



S3JBUI3J 



S3p3J\[ 



.- o 

U bfl.fi 
be C O 

<u "a; _ 



P*M 



S9JBUI9^J 



S3[Bp\[ 



o C c/> . 
►-. o ■- * J 

>2<& E 



I^oj, 



S3[BUI3j; 



S3p3J\[ 



"^ 



O 



a 
b .a 

Oh bfl^ 
«_, E . 

opQ 



PWI 



ssp^uiaj; 



sap3j\[ 



£ o 
° c 



P^oi 



S3P3UI3J 



S3p3J^ 



O 

M 

H 
< 
U 

c 
hi 



o30^nMOQOOl , ^ , ^l<o , ^ , 



i-Hi— I rlrti- iHriHr- 1 I-H 



OOMOINOOiOOffl1 l 'OOl 






SB 



ba 



O^THOOCOC^WMrtWiOM 

tpiocncococoiococo-^ii-iiOco 



iciHHHHciHeoo cn i-i 



Si 



COa5Tt-~a>«Okr5l^CM©l^©iO 

HINHHrtHOIHMD CO i-H 



TMOioaooiot*!OOinoHcc ! 
■* w as «Qjto xtoooNeumHi' 

"* CO ?* C0*CO COlOCOC^Tfli— iSOCO 



■*rHTra0«33)OlCTl*r- It^O". r- 
MCOHHHHlMHCOM CN rH 



WMiNMt*iHtO»1<»3lON 
W0Or-(HOJH(NHCO!N CO i-H 



Hiositofaior^im^oiooi 

ClOJCOutiOaOCOiOi— (r-GCCNI-~ 



0)05HM^C4CO'N'*Ot -CO r-i 



ClM(OXH»MOHtOHOi 
•^I^MNNMrtMOMOlOOiJO 
OICOHiNMCJCO'NTtiC^ MH 



OOiOOMOifflt»NiOCOHiOO 



0!OM>CO>tOt^HHiOtO 

•^criior-i^t-cci^aocsccn-i© 

NN'-IHHHN'HM^ CO CM 



C0ffjC0t0(CO)r-(O'<T(N^p"T)< 
CN CM i-H i-H ^H —I CM CM CO <M CM CN 



xr>ciooHio^«i*©ociH 
oooot— ir-icM-^i-iccsoeocc©© 

TjnOCO'^iCi-^CCctii^LCi— icOCO 



ffitOHrlOTOl^O^Ol^O 
lO -rtiO r- IMMHr- I OS t^ OS »-• 00 

CN CO t-H CN CM CN CO OJ CC 04 CO i-l 



ClH(»>Hr<'rHH<f ONH 
CMCOrHCNCOCN CO CNCOCN CO i— I 



w. 



m 



t! .O) E 



r ^ . 



C/3 



,co 

:wWo 

■— i C r- C r- TS c OC ™ 

S § g^.p^s S E § B S.S >, 

rt t > be 






p. 



<o bfl 
<U C 
03 cfl 






o 



u 
u."2 



v- *j C j; J: >, ^ " 

O JHJ3 3E C CO^^E £ 
a) 3 OT3 '- v--E ° " rt._ 



c 
o 

- bo 

c a 






4> 

3 
C 

■M 

c 
o 
O 



CO 

-I 

O 

o 

I 
o 

CO 

o 

-1 
m 

D 
Q. 

U 

I 
H 

u. 
O 

co 

z 

CC 

D 
I- 
UJ 

a 

< 

D 
Z 
Z 
< 

UJ 

x 

(JL 
O 

> 

< 



D 
CO 



iO CO CI 00 O CCC^NH*5TfO!N'1 < a!OOONM lOOXO ONOHTfiOOO 

I— ((Mi— IM r- I t— I i— I CN I— I I— I CN I— I 1— li-( i— I CN i— I 1— I r-l I— l(N H«r- 1 N H H O) H 



""" ' 


C0 iC CN f> 


cocN-^iocoeoTfeoco-^ir-icoiococN 


■*CJW^ 


CNCNCNTCOCNTCO 


CO 

a> 


o 


OO OO 

HffiHTll 
OJ CO 05 CO 


ooooooooooooooo oooo 
ccooc75QOaoa5a5Ciocx x —. oooia as o x co 


C00i00i,000 
OCNOOOlCNrrCN 

a> cs ccs as x C75CT>C75 


o 

OS 


r~ 




MoO't^l^COiflOirjrH'^CgWTO 
i-l HC^ i-H ,-H i-H i-H (N <M 


iCOOOt- 


i^ x r-i io co iO C4 cc 

I-H I-H I-H I-H -"f 


CO 


eo 


i-H MX O 
Tj< I- CN T 


L^ffliOKHO^rtOHMiOtfiHMOO 
CN rH CN Tt< CN -*t< CO f C-( CN CTi CO CN 


TJ1 <£> Tp CN 

ac, co "* co 


-T^HOCNOOTCC 
CN CO tO CN Tfir-H 


CO 

o 
© 


CN 


CO CO -<*• <£> 
i— 1 CN t— 1 


i-H CN i-H i-H i-H i-H i-H CO CN CN i-H 


TJ1 «C CO — 

CN 


I-H i-HCN CNH 


r- 

CN 

-31 


c- 


o^oto 


OOHOSlOHOOOOOr- i O I> ■<»< © © 
CO i-H CN i-H CN i-H i-H <N 


30(0'a' 
i-H CNCN 


iCNHiO^Xl-O 
CN iH r-l 


a> 

CO 
CO 



CO OCOtO-rfl OlHOOCOMI^Clu-. OHiOOilClOiO lO O -# CO CN CO i-H t~- X lO CC 'O 

TT iO«Oi-iCN OHt^OHOiOSlMiCNCOtOt^OlH tOOClDCO M H S! H iO O iO t^ 

i— ICNi-HCNrHi-Hi— ICNi— li— I i— li-Hi— l CN rllNHHn i-H i— I I-H 1— I CNrHi— ICNrH 



-rH (OMCC00 CNi-HiO05-rfC75t^I^U0aDC5cNOCJ5C0 lO CI iO CN •JSr^'^l^^Ht^.cO-" 

CO OCOIOCO OOini'WHDiOCMMHNMOa Vl*CNt« © OS t^ lO CN CO X CO 
i— ICN r- 1 i— lr— li-Hi— li-Hi— li— li— l i— ICNrH i-H i— 1 i— 1 i— 1 i— 1 i— 1 i— In 


>* 
CO 

OJ 

CO 


•^ ^OIX.Cl COeOCNCNiOi-HHjtODl^COOCOCOXCN CNOiir t> iOtOHMO>»t^cO 
i-H -<9< CN CN l> ■J^iCCl^iO^t^rJilOtOH^HlO'* 00 CO C t~- lO^^l^-lOCOCC© 

i-H i-H 


CO 
i-H 



CN t* co CO ao 

TJI COiOHO 
i-H CN r-H CN 



OiOTHOO»H»-"OHiOocaOiO 1>OOl»CNOOH.-OOiOt-- 
OC^Xr- ICOlOt^CNCO«OCOTI"iOCNi— I lOOOC^^Ht^C^iOOCOiC 
i-H rHCNr- li— I i— I i-H i— It— I i— I CN i-H i-H i-H i— I i— I r- IH i-Hi— li— ICNi-H 



w 



W 



w 



CT3 



> tn C 

« r « 



:w *j .ticft Wc/3 

~ rt rt 

CQUU 



C .j 

WW 



o 
& o rt rt w-£ 



^ w 



V V „ «h CUTIS" 1 > C O «i?6 W 53 3 P H 



C o^ rt gy5 § 



1h — 

C rt rt 

uuu 



hJ2 



uQ 



fc! « « « i:^S iiS c oSc c:s ot>c«-'u^ 
3 i- j- C-- rtjs O (U,5J:.5 O OvT >, v > O^^T 
wMOWWJUJuSSa.CUpL,>wH<0>> 



o 

h 



w *j 



> 05 

bo C 

« 



w *^ 

ij be 



)W ^^ 

.. cWW 



*J bfl 



> 






♦j op te ~ 



W 



w 

xw 



,* M Jififfitt.-H.S 



^S^Oo 1 " ^w^ 



^^X^r 



lsP^i^g^fi-2^?.' 



;X*rJ +-. 



■ "UUUQt]foOO^Ji-lJJ^CHCHCHrHpia;H^>> 



UU 



■o 

V 

3 
C 

c 
o 
O 



CO 

-I 
O 
O 

J. 

o 

CO 

o 

-I 
m 

D 
Q. 

LU 

I 
h 

U. 

O 

CO 

z 
cc 

D 
H 

UJ 

CC 

-I 
< 

D 
Z 
Z 
< 

UJ 

I 
h 

IL 

o 

> 

DC 
< 

D 
CO 



CO CO ffl M 01 
CN -r OS OS T 

t^rHOirllO 
i— i t- T 



H5C 
OS X 


CO 

CO 


03 

OS 1- CN 

1-00X 


CN l^ © 

t~- l> CO 


OlO-OOiTKX 


OS 

cc 


i/3 

OS 

CO 


l^ CO o 
to cn o r~ x 




OSX 
i— 1 


CN 


r ^ 


o cc o 


OOCNOOOi-lr-l 


o 


1—1 


i-i 1-h ro r- o 

HI-HCNH 
CN-T 


CN 

CO 


O OS 


OS 


CO TT X 


CO CN CM 

i-H CN CN 


riHMXXwO* 
TCO»JHHDth 


CO 
i/3 
CO 


o 


os to x os to 

CN CO O 1(0 
rj< O CO 


cc 

cc 

CC 


co to 

i—i 


OS 


OHM 


HOCN 


CNOOOOrHOr-l 


3 


1/0 


Os 1> r^ os i-i 

CMOCJHH 


s 


oo 


O 


ooo 


ooo 


OOOO _» O O — 


1—1 


1/3 
CO 


■— 1 -r OS O I/O 
tO CO CO TO 
TT O CO 


o> 


oo 

CN M 


o 

1/3 


CO CN O 
HiOcO 


lO-fiQtOOTCOCNCOXTH 


CO 
CO 
CO 


CN 


O-CJS* 
O CN r~ 1/3 CO 

l-H tO 1/3 tO 


CO 
OS 
CN 



co en io co co 

CO CO U0 CN CO 
CO CN t/3 i-H CO 
i-i lO CO 



CO -f CO O CN 
CN O I/O T CN 

HlQCO 



HMci^h 
UO -r CC CO t~- 

to r- o i— i to 

1—1 tO Ttl 



OS i/3 

coi^ 

i-i i/O 



T O 1/3 
CO 1/3 CO 

OlH^I 



i-i to I t- 



r^OCOt^O 

CO OS — I (O rH 

r-Moi cn 

CN i—l 



cr.oio »ho wtm^mnwo cn 

r-iiCCOiOfiCtOiOiOCOTrCOX'^ to 



ban: 
c <^ 

•- c 

X t- 
V o 



>>>,« 



X c ►> 



ca rt.5 ^ c ca ~Ph.E S 



2*3 E 



PmPh 



.CO 1 






H 






£ <* h 

rt w - 

pj o - 






o = -- 



a! 
SCGCCCCCC C*-< c c c 



o 

H 



T3 

rt c/J 

r>> c 
f3 O 

1?E 
o o 



CO 



,<X 



, O n 

Oyj y O «J 

^ 2 ^ S 

t/-i p u i_ 

E cans <l> 

J <- c <^ "C 

t5 o p- S 12 



CN t> 


CT5 


lO i-H O X lO IS 


*r ICOOl— ICN-TCO 


O 


to 


CO 1-H X 05 to 


t- 


i-H CO 


■* 


i— 1 i— ( 


1-H i-H i-H I-H i— 1 CN i-H 


to 

1-H 


rjl 


I/O CO CN tT to 
1^ tO I- i-i 
CN H 


CN 
CO 
lO 


1-H CO 


TT 


l^ tO CO •" 1/3 lO 


iCCOtOOCOXOCN 


r- 


lO 


i/3 X I>- TT I— 


,_, 


CN 1/3 


t^- 


i-H i-H r-i 


1-H 1-H 1-H »-H H 1-H 


to 

1-H 


o 


H iC CN t^ tO 

tO tO X i-H 
CN i-H 


co 

lO 



■^i co 


f« 


l^-COl^CNX ^3 CCOhh-tm:* 


,_| 


,_, 




CO 


i-H «r 


lO 


i-H i-H i-H rH CN rH CN i-H i— 1 rH CN i-H 


CM 


iC 


CCWCNlOH 
I> X O. CN 
CN — 


00 
iC 


CN r-H 


CO 


OOO OXl^ OM.CflOOMO 


,-H 


CO 


r~ o co co i— i 




CN tO 


X 


CNi-HCN 1-HCNrHrH,— IrHi— (CNl-H 


CN 


l-~ 


MiOCOOOH 
OX O CN 
CN CN 


X 



1-H O 


,_l 


xto-r ict* oioof»0'ri'»'T 


tc 


iO 


04 CO X — tO 


O 


CN SO 


X 


CN rH CNCNCN COfMCOi-HCNCN'VCN 


CO 


l> 


i—i CO r-H X T 
dlCO-f CO 
CO CN 


OS 
o 


to o 


to 


O i - CJ-. f 1^ X CO Ol I- O r- -n" o o 


1-H 


CO 


Oi "C CN to i-H 




CN X 


o 


i-HCNi-H COrHCN CO Ol O) rt " H CO M 


CO 




CO — to O CO 






1-1 




co 


•H 


l^ Tt< i/3 rH CO 
COCN 


t^ 





^5 


MOO) tO CO T XCNXr-H^-l/iOtO 


O 


to 


1^ O) <—< CO to 




CN 1/3 


X 


1-H 1-H 1-H CN r-H i-H i-H 1-H i-H ,-H CN 1-H 


CN 


I> 


O tO CN X i-H 
tD X O CN 
CN CN 


iO 



O i-H 


O 


Xi/3CN f-rco OiOOMO-i^t 


OS 


o 


■fl" CO X O OS 


■*r 


1-H U0 


I> 


CNr-H CNCNCN COCNCOi-HCNCN'HCN 


CO 
CO 


r~ 


O O tO L^ CO 
OS CN CN CO 
CO CN 


to 


i/3 CO 


X 


o i^ x it<>^ MO)i-ot»cooo) 


o 


i> 


i-HOCO xo 


CN 


CN t~- 


o 


r-H CM i-H COrHCN COCNCNCN^Hi-HCOCN 


CO 


o 


co -r i^ os co 


t» 








CO 




I> CN CO CO 
CO CN 


to 



V 

<u a 






> • 

> ^ 



CX <u 

C^3 



ES C 



XT3 



E *j w ^^.E"P ^ 
ca 'ti o cj , i — i is"5 

-> <d , jet u v /a ^ 

rttc«> = ^ 
bCrt vj: o F 3 ° ca 



- O % V - Cu 



O 
> 



ca 
E 
E 

3 
C/3 



• INDEX 

Administration 4 

Attendance Officers' Report 33 

Certificates granted 54 

Elections 17 

Evening Schools 30 

Evening School Summary 32 

Evening School Teachers 50-52 

General statistics 7-8 

High school 19-20 

In memoriam 18 

List of Text Books 55-64 

Manual training and cooking 24 

Medical and dental supervision 20 

Naturalization 31 

Organization of School Committee, 1918 3 

Organization of School Committee, 1919 5 

Penmanship 25-26 

Pupils by grades 19 

Receipts and Expenditures 9-11 

Receipts and Expenditures (Discussion) 11-12 

Resignations 16 

Retirements 16 

Roll of day teachers 35-50 

Salary Schedule 53 

Schoolhouses 14-16 

School and home gardens 27-28 

School census 13-14 

School nursing 21-23 

School physicians 20, 49 

School savings banks 23 

School hours 31 

Sight and hearing tests 23 

Summary of annual returns 65-67 

Training schools 28-30 

Vacations 31 

Vocational school 24-25 

War Activities and Military Service 26-27 



CITY OF LOWELL 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



City Auditor 



FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 

1918 



Municipal Council 
1918 



Mayor 
PERRY D. THOMPSON, Public Safety 

Alderman 
JAMES E. DONNELLY, Finance 

Alderman 
CHARLES J. MORSE, Streets and Highways 

Alderman 
FRANCIS A. WARNOCK, Property and Licenses 

Alderman 
GEORGE H. BROWN, Fire and Water 



CITY OF LOWELL 



Lowell is situated at the confluence of the Merrimack and Concord Rivers. 
Was settled in 1653, called Chelmsford Grant. First Town Meeting in 

1654. 
Was originally a part of Chelmsford. 
Incorporated as a Town in 1826. 
Incorporated as a City in 1836. 

Part of Tewksbury annexed in 1834, 1874, 1898, 1906. 
Part of Dracut annexed in 1851, 1874, 1879. 
Part of Chelmsford annexed in 1826, 1874. 
Population, 125,000. 

Has 217.8 miles of streets, 144.8 accepted, 73 unaccepted. 
Has 120 miles of sewers, costing $6,766,961.53. 
Has an area of 14.1 square miles. 

Assessed valuation $98,774,850.00, and 28,202 assessed polls. 
Tax rate $23.80 per $1000.00, per cent, of valuation 100. 
Bonded indebtedness $4,461,875.00, sinking funds $1,597,655.31. 
City Hall and Memorial Building costing $450,000. 
School Department — 62 buildings costing $2,700,000.00. 362 teachers. 
Fire Department — 14 buildings, 6 engines, 4 hook and ladder trucks, 3 

autos, 10 auto combinations, 2 chemicals, 6 hose wagons, 156 alarm 

boxes, 133 miles wire, 155 officers and men. 
Police Department — 1 station, 2 auto patrols, 2 patrol wagons, 157 officers 

and men, 70 signal boxes. 
Water Department — Date of construction, 1870 to 1873; high service, 1881; 

driven wells, 1893 to 1916. 

Source of supply — Two hundred ten (210) driven wells in the valley 
of River Meadow Brook, and four hundred seventy-nine (479) 
driven wells at Pawtucket Boulevard. 

Mode of supply — Pumping to reservoir and pumping direct. Filtered 
through coke and sand. 

Daily capacity 14,000,000 gallons; 157.46 miles mains; 1457 fire hy- 
drants ; reservoir capacity 5 days' supply ; consumes 5,442,967 
daily. 
Park Department — 160.322 acres of parks and playgrounds valued at 

$716,400.00. 
Has five National Banks, two Trust Companies. 
Has eight Savings Banks. 
Has three Co-operative Banks. 
Has 16^ miles waterways. 
Develops about 30,000 h. p. daily by means of 6]/ 2 miles of canals which 

furnish power for manufacturing plants. 
Has the largest Textile School. 
Has more than 1000 manufacturing plants. 



Auditor's Department 

CITY OF LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 



That the Auditor, with the exception of monthly bills approved by the 
Municipal Council, issue no draft to pay any bill without THREE signa- 
tures of the Municipal Council. 

All bills or claims for work performed must be presented to the DE- 
PARTMENT ORDERING SAME; those for supplies furnished and 
contracts must be presented to the PURCHASING AGENT. 

All bills or claims must be received by the City on or before the 
FIRST day of the month. 

All department receipts must be sent to the Purchasing Agent on or 
before the THIRD day of the month. 

All bills or claims shall be presented to the Commissioner of the De- 
partment contracting the same on or before the THIRD day of each 
month. 

All bills after approval by the Commissioner, shall be listed and sent 
to the Auditor's Department not later than the EIGLITH day, for final 
approval by the Municipal Council. 

ALL BILLS OR OTHER CLAIMS, BEFORE THEY ARE 
FINALLY CERTIFIED BY THE AUDITOR OR PAID SHALL BE 
APPROVED BY THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL. 

Bills will be paid on the FIFTEENTH day of each month. 

OFFICES IN THE CITY FIALL ARE OPEN FROM 9 A. M. 
UNTIL 4 P. M. EXCEPT SATURDAY. 



Auditing Department 

CITY OF LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 



To the Honorable the Mayor and Municipal Council, 

Gentlemen : — 

In accordance with provisions of the city Charter, of the 
City of Lowell, I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the business transacted in the office of the city auditor for the 
fiscal year of 1918. 

Complying with the acts of 1914, section 322, I have made 
the annual audit of all the trust funds of the city. 

Information of general interest to the city is also included. 

The accounts of all the departments of the city were audited 
by Mr. Everett E. Tarbox, certified municipal accountant. His 
report is also included. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES D. PAIGE, 

Auditor. 



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF THE CITY OF LOWELL, 
DECEMBER 81, 1918 

Assets 

Ordinary City Debt Sinking Fund $ 687,260.75 

Water Debt Sinking Fund 910,394.56 

Outstanding Assessments : 

Taxes 773,972.40 

Sidewalk 1,963.33 

Sewers 9,361.71 

Street Watering 10,562.22 

Moth 1,315.30 

Department Bills 25,355.94 

Cash Balance December 31 240,542.55 

Total Available Assets $ 2,660,728.76 

Valuation of Water Works, both Real Estate and Per- 
sonal Property $ 2,029,376.67 

Valuation of City Buildings, Land, Personal Property 6,202,822.33 

Total Unavailable Assets '. $ 8,232,199.00 

Total Available Assets $ 2,660,728.76 

Total Unavailable Assets 8,232,199.00 

Grand Total $10,892,927.76 



Liabilities 

Ordinary City Debt $ 3,311,746.30 S 

Water Works Debt 1,432,750.00 

Total Gross City Debt 4,744,496.30 

Temporary Loan 1,000,000.00 

Balance Unexpended 95,203.49 

Total Liabilities 5,839,699.79 

Surplus of Assets 5,053,227.97 

Grand Total $10,892,927.76 



00 

T— t 

ON 



o 

o 

o 
Tt- 

no" 
10 



4/3- 



LO 

^f" 
to 
CO 

cm" 
4/3- 



00 00 

LO o 
lo On 

t-H 00 



CM 

4/3- 



no 

NO, 

LO 

<* 

o_ 
co" 

CM 
<* 

cm" 
4/3- 



CM O 


ON 


n 


CM N 


NO 


CM 


CMOO 


vO* 


co" 


T-H VO 


n 


o 


non 


n 


CM, 


io'cm" 


r- 1 


CO" 


CM 


i—i 


NO 

cm" 

4/3- 



OO 
> 



1) 

TO 

a 

<u 

O 

CD 

Q 



o 
bo 






u 
qj 

> 

X 
co 



3 

<-G 



H 



o 

o 

CM 
4/3- 



I CM 

CM 
00 
CM 



t2 <fl 

co 

> 



^ E 

-^ c 

° I 

~ U 






<o 

NO 
CM 



CM NO 
^^ 
Nco 

O^f 

t— I NO 
ONLO" 

ooo 

lo t^ 

1— ( 
4/3- 



o 

00 

co - 

CM 

4/3- 

-t-> „ 

co - 



oo 
op 

LO O 

CM O 

Cm"no" 
LO OO 

rt-"^-" 

CM N 

4/3- 



oo 
op 

LO O 

NO 
co"o" 

LO T— I 

T— I 

4/3- 



oo 
oo 

oo 

LO o 

oo"no" 

ONN 
LO i—l 

CN1 N 



o 


ro 


'~ 


^ 


rt 


c3 


d 


> 


S 




> 


4-J 




rt 






co 


Cfl 


G 


w 


O 





CO 



LO 

tc" 

LO 

CO 

cm" 
4/3- 



o> 
o 

LO 

CM 

T-H 

On" 
co 

ON 

oo" 

On 
4/3- 



O 
O 

LO 

CM 
^■" 

NO 
i— ( 

4/3- 



O 

o 
o 

LO 

00 

oo" 

On 
4/3- 



O 



Ih co 



X 

co 

H 

c3 

> 



O 

H 



co 
K« 

H c 

>,-o 

•.-I CO 

(J <u 



►J 

X 
H 

"o3 
o 
H 



_Mh -O 

o o 



o 



O OOi-h oo 

OOOfOOH 

O O O r-4 O "O 

O O O <0 O0 On 
\O r O^ 00^ NO_ ^t ON 

n o" i-T cm" tj-" ■*" 

1— I t— I T-H O 

O CM •— i 

cm" 



i-<CM 


COLO 


CO CO 


X^LO 

'vO LO 
LO LO 


On'lo 

i—i co 

l-H O 


LO O 

LO ON 

»Hoq 


LO LO 

CO 


no'lo* 

O 

"3- 


»-H T-H 
T-H T-H 
<* 


cm' 


cm" 

4^ 


cm" 



X 
03 

H 
en 
bJO 

.5 

en 
en 






r-1 



O 
O 

Jc/2 
•h r^ 

O, *-" 

O X 
U, CD 

W (U d D r| 

>> ? ti ti ti 3 
,ti o 55 5 o 
U kh en cd cd u 



T* O FN 



> 
C 

o >> 

+- 1 c3 
Ch u 

no 

4-1 

O 

H 



cu 

vO 



QJ 
CU 

Q 



X 

H 



a 



co 



00 
ON 

T-H 

p rt 

<uH 
>, 

u_i CO 

X^ 

CO -*-J 



o o 



NO CM O ON 
NO, CN| N NO 

lo cm' oo no' 

^t-HOtS 

q\qNN 

COLO CM t— '* 
CM CM t-h 

cm" 

09- 



O 

X 

W 

X 

CO 

H 

;>> 

CO 

'co 



^ X 

X tUD 

co C 



J co 

CO -i-i 

: £-h co 
'O tri -CTj 



O a 
Hon 



cUtG' 
— +j Jr CO 



rt 



CM 

CO 

O 
CM^ 

co" 

NO 

cm" 

4>e- 






O 



CO'" 

o 

H 



00 



CC 
< 

LU 

> 

UJ 

I 



Q 
< 



CO 

I- 
z 

LU 
UJ 

h 
< 

< 

f- 
LU 

Z 



K 



CM rj- t^ r\ 

On O t^» CM 
CM r-J CM vd 

lO^-fOON 

0^10 w cm_^ 

CM*" co' VO 



NOLO 00 CM 

i— I r— I i— I O 

cm' <rj o ^t- 

O O «-0 i— i 



■ee- 



\CtOMO 
!>,. t-j LO CM 

cod CM 

vO CM LO GO 

00 00 t— i 

c\f — r 



o oo 
o oo 



CO ' 
CO 

09- 



fO 



On On On On 



CO 

I- 
z 

LU 

LU 

h 
< 

< 

o 

z 

_j 



CC 
0. 
CO 

H- 
LU 
LU 
CC 

1- 

co 





+-> 




B 


-o 


1> 


01 
Efl 


E 


tf] 


>. 


t) 


Tt 




P-, 


rt 


U 


<U 


cu 


tf 






< 



Oh 
'_ 

^ (LI 

W £ 

Oh 



M 



to 

as 



<& 



^-oo 

CM i-h 

r— l 



COlO 

CO On 



o 
o 



C\LO 

O On 

coi-h 



CM OO 

I>!rO »~i 

i— i i—i 



-rj- LO LO 

cm <-; On 
r< t-h' ^i 

T— I T— I 1—1 

£9- 



■<*■ r^ co 

On On On 



CO 

H- 
Z 
LU 

^ 
LU 

< 

CO 

< 

X 

< 
h 

I 

H 
O 



> 



LO LO O 

^H CM NO 



</> 



LO LO O 

i— i CM NO 



LO LO O 

r— I CM NO 



V=h 



On ON On 



LO 
^"' 

CM 

y— I 

o 

NO 
CO 

cm' 

c/) 

I— I 
On 
On 

O 

H 

PQ 
W 



< 

Ph 

I — I 

u 
ft 



C 
H 



BALANCE SHEET 
DECEMBER 31, 1918 



Dr. 


Cash 


REVENUE 


Cr. 


$ 181,283.18 .. 




1,069.64 .. 


Taxes 


1915 




24,086.66 .. 


" 


1916 




205,157.84 .. 


41 


1917 




543,658.26 .. 


it 


1918 




1.25 .. 


Moth 


1915 






" 


1916 


$ .20 


363.55 .. 


a 


1917 




950.50 .. 


" 


1918 




14.55 .. 


Sprinkling 


1915 




3.46 .. 


<> 


1916 




3,156.17 .. 


<< 


1917 




7,388.04 ... 


M 


1918 





Overlay 1916 16,807.25 

" 1917 15,051.34 

" 1918 28,294.50 

5,704.40 Tax Titles 

1,963.33 Sidewalk Assessment 

9,361.71 Sewer Assessment 

25,355.94 Department Accts. Rec 

3,979.15 Cemetery Accts. Rec 

14,277.86 Water Accts. Rec 

Tax Revenue Loans 1,000,000.00 

Revenue Appropriations 11,013.33 

Cemetery Revenue 3,979.15 

Water Revenue 14,277.86 

73,941.25 Other Revenue 

Premiums 968.07 

Sidewalk Revenue 1,963.33 

Sewer Revenue 9,361.71 



$1,101,716.64 $1,101,716.64 



NON-REVENUE 

$ 59,259.37 Cash 

Appropriations $ 59,259.37 

Loans Authorized 

$ 59,259.37 $ 59,259.37 



INDEBTEDNESS 

December 31, 1918 



Sinking Funds 
Cash and Securities 



Funded Debt 



Citv Hall Fund $ 415,644.03 

High School Fund 141,68571 

New Schoolhonse Fund 129,931.01 

Water Construction Fd. 910,394.56 

Net Bonded Debt 2,864,219.69 



City Hall Loan pavable 
1920 ." 

High School Loan pay- 
able 1921 

New Schoolhonse Loan 
payable 1926 

Water Construction 
Loan payable 1920 .. 

General Citv 3^4 Loan 
4 

4^ 
434 
4 7/10 

Nesmith Fund 1870 

Nesmith Fund 1970 

City paying 6 per cent. 

Carney Medal Fund 



$ 450,000.00 

150,000.00 

200,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

24,000.00 

1,795,375.00 

103,400.00 

647,900.00 

50,000.00 

15,000.00 

25,000.00 

1,000.00 

200.00 



$4,461,875.00 



$4,461,875.00 



TRUST FUNDS 



Cash and Securities $ 259,284.50 

Cash Used by City in 

1870, and now paying 

6 per cent 26,200.00 



Carney Medal Fund .... 
Hapgood Wright Fund 
John Davis Library Fd. 
Jonathan Tyler Fund .... 
Thos. Nesmith Fund .... 
Thos. Nesmith Fund .... 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Unpaid Debt and In- 



200.00 

5,691.58 

97,496.21 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

1,000.00 

139,427.96 



terest 


6,668.75 


$ 285,484.50 


$ 285,484.50 


Property 



Dr. 

$2,029,376.67 Water Works 
2,094.890.00 Schools 
2,751,247.42 General Departments 

City of Lowell (Balancing Account) 



Cr. 



$6,875,514.09 



$6,875,514.09 



$6,875,514.09 



CITY OF LOWELL, DEC- 31, 1918 



THE MUNICIPAL DEBT 



Gross Debt 

Total ordinary city debt $3,076,125.00 

Total Water Works debt 1,385,750.00 

Total Tax Revenue loans 1,000,000.00 

Gross Debt December 31, 1918 $5,461,875.00 



Net City Debt 

Total ordinary debt, January 1, 1918 $3,311,746.30 

Sinking Fund 687,260.75 

Total $2,624,485.55 

Payments 412.621.30 

Total $2,211,864.25 

Loans 177,000.00 



Net debt $2,388,864.25 



Net Water Debt 

Total ordinary Water debt, January 1, 1918 $1,432,750.00 

Sinking fund 910,394.56 

$ 522,355.44 
Payments 47,000.00 

Total $ 475,355.44 



Total Net City and Water Debt Dec. 31, 1918 

City $2,388,864.25 

Water 475,355.44 

Total $2,864,219.69 



LIMIT OF INDEBTEDNESS 

DECEMBER 31, 1918 



City, January 1, 1918 $3,311,746.30 

Water 1,432,750.00 

Revenue tax loan 750,000.00 

Gross debt January 1, 1918 $5,494,496.30 

Total gross debt, January 1, 1918 $5,494,496.30 

Deduct by legislation : 

. Water $1,432,750.00 

Special legislation 1,139,500.00 

Revenue tax loan 750,000.00 3,322,250.00 

City debt as relates to limit of indebtedness .... $2,172,246.30 

Limit of municipal debt for 1918 $2,308,855.46 

City debt as relates to limit 2,172,246.30 

Distance from Debt Limit January 1, 1918 $ 136,609.16 

Borrowing Limit December 31 $ 372,230.46 

Loans 1918 

Sewer Construction 18 years $ 36,000.00 

Paving 10 years 50,000.00 

New Sidewalks 2 years 5,000.00 

Macadam 5 years 25,000.00 

Sewer Construction 25 years 25,000.00 

German War 1 year 15,000.00 

Health 5 years 15,000.00 

Sewer Construction 6 years 6,000.00 

Total $ 177,000.00 



CLASSIFICATION OF 

Receipts and Payments 

BY SCHEDULES 
Year of 1918 



16 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 

for 
Expenses 


Revenue 
for 

Outlays 


Total 


General Revenue 

1 Taxes: 

Current Year — 

1 Property 


$1,843,387.13 
29,704.00 

499,398.18 
18,308.00 

164,014.13 

18,S23.60 

2,623.42 

104,800.67 

53.48 




* 


2 Poll 




Previous Years — 
3 Property 




4 Poll 




From the State — 

5 Corporation and Business 

6 Street Railway (exclusive of 
Boston Elevated excise tax) 

7a Bank 

b Income 




Tax Title Redemptions 




Total from Taxes 


$2,680,812.61 




$2,680,812.61 




2 Licenses and Permits : 

Licenses — 

8 Liquor 

9 All Other 


$ 144,836.00 
10,784.50 

1,177.00 






Permits — 
10 Marriage 




11 All Other 








Total from Licenses and Per- 
mits 


$ 156,797.50 




$ 156,797.56 


3 Fines and Forfeits : 

12 Court 

13 Department Penalties 

14 Contract Violations 


$ 10,241.18 


. 








Total from Fines and Forfeits 

1 


$ 10,241.18 




$ 10,241.18 


i 









Total forward , | 



I $2,847,851.29 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



17 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 

for 
Expenses 


Revenue 
for 

Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 






$2,847,851.29 


4 Grants and Gifts: 






Grants from Other Civil 








Divisions — 








15 From State, for Education .... 








a Support of Public Schools 








b Aid to High Schools 








c Aid to Industrial Schools 




d High School Tuition 








e Union Superintendency .... 




16 From State, for Armories .... 








17 From State, for Highway 








Purposes 








18 From State fo*r Other Pur- 








poses 








a Inspector of Animals 








b Protection Against Forest 








Fires 








19 From County (Dog Li- 




censes), for Schools or 








Libraries 


$ 3,828.88 






Gifts from Individuals — 






20 For Expenses 








21 For Outlays 








Total from Grants and Gifts .... 


$ 3,828.88 




$ 3,828.88 


5 All Other General Revenue: 




' 




22 








23 








Total from All Other General 








Revenue 












Total forward 






$2,851,680.17 



18 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 

for 
Expenses 


Revenue 

for 
Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 


1 

$ 25,935.88 1 

2,675.59 1 

13,845.74 1 

6,187.84 

i 


$2,851,680.17 


Commercial Revenue 
6 Special Assessments: 

24 Street Sprinkling 


25 Moth Extermination 




26 Sewers 




27 Sidewalks and Curbing 




28 Other Purposes 












Total from Special Assessments 


$ 48,645.05 




$ 48,645.05 


7 Privileges. 
29 Public Service 








30 Minor 






Total from Privileges 




Total forward 


I i 




1 




$2,900,325.22 



20 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 
8 Departmental: 



8a General Government 
Legislative — 
31 Aldermen and Council ; 



Executive — 

32 Mayor ; Commission ; Select- 
men 



and 



Financial — 

33 Auditor, Accountant, 

Auditing 

34 Treasurer 

35 Collector 

36 Assessors 

37 License Commissioners 

38 Other Finance Officers and 

Accounts 



Other General Departments 

39 Law 

40 City or Town Clerk 



General Government forward 
Total forward 



$ 2,228.81 



169.39 



1,081.55 



3,479.75 



$2,900,325.22 



J $2,900,325.22 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



21 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


1 Departmental: 


i 




la General Government 
Legislative — 
1 Aldermen and Council ; 
Moderator 


$ 10,000.00 
4,309.91 






a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 




Executive — 
2 Mayor ; Commission ; Select- 








men 


f 

5,056.34 
593.26 






a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 




Financial — 
3 Auditor, Accountant, and 
Auditing 


995.00 
5,250.00 
1,148.68 

12,632,84 
4,345.81 

15,324.50 
1,492.40 

4,364.04 
265,70 

4,100.00 
886.58 

7,464.49 
1,915.06 






a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 

4 Treasurer and Collector 

a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 

6 Assessors 




a Salaries and Wages 




b Other Expenses 

7 License Commissioners 




a Salaries and Wages 




b Other Expenses 




Other General Departments 

9 Law 

a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 




10 Citv or Town Clerk 




a Salaries and Wages 

b Other Expenses 








General Government forward .. 


$ 80,144.61 







22 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 
RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 
for 

Expenses 


Offsets 

to 
Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 


$ 3,479.75 


$2 000 325 7? 


General Government forward .. 




Y >" ~~,~— ~.— — 


41 City Messenger 




$ 310.00 




42 Public Works 




43 Engineering 




44 Supt. of Buildings 




45 Election and Registration .... 

46 Other General Depts 




Municipal Buildings — 
7 City or Town Hall 




a City Hall Boilers 








Total for General Government 


$ 3,479.75 


$ ' 310.00 


$ 3,789.75 


8b Protection of Persons and 
Property 








Police Department 




48 Services of Officers 


| 

$ 75.721 
2,950.00 

I 

1 

f i 

i i 

i 
i i 




49 Sale of Materials 




50 Miscellaneous 




Rental Court by County 




Protection of Persons and 
Property forward 


!$ 3,025.72 


1 


i 



Total forward 



I $2,904,1 14.97 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 
PAYMENTS 



23 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Expenses 



General Government forward ..|$ 80,144.61 
11 City Messenger 

a Salaries and Wages I 1,400.00 

b Other Expenses 105.69 

13 Engineering 

a Salaries and Wages 7,484.88 

b Other Expenses 244.65 

14 Supt. of Buildings 

a Salaries and Wages 2,000.00 

14 Election and Registration 

a Salaries and Wages 15,334.59 j 

b Other Expenses 5,067.40 

16 Other General Depts. 
Purchasing Agent — 

a Salaries and Wages 6,316.42 

b Other Expenses 1,474.46 

c Reg. Labor 534.78 

Municipal Buildings — 

17 City or Town Hall 

a Salaries and Wages 12,956.64 

b Other Expenses (including 

heating Memorial Bldg.) 10,560.53 



Outlays 



Total 



Total for General Government |$ 144,624.65 



lb Protection of Persons and| 
Property 
Police Department — I 

18 Salaries and Wages |$ 201,150.84 

19 Horses and Care of Same ....j 510.01 

20 Equipment and Repairs | 989.64 

22 Maintenance of Buildings I 

and Grounds | 

24 Other Expenses j 5,286.38 

Insurance [ 6,079.29 

Police Wires | 

Waterways — Protection j 526.45 

Protection of Persons and| 

Property forward j$ 214,542.61 

Total forward ! 



$ 15,144.83) 
$ 15,144.83 



$ 158,769.48 



$ 158,769.48 



24 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

TO 

Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 



$2,904,114.97 



Protection of Persons and 1 

Property forward |$ 

Fire Department — 

51 Sale of Materials 

52 Miscellaneous 



Militia — 

53 Armories 

54 Rifle Ranges 

Inspection — 

55 Inspection of Buildings 

56 Inspection of Wires 

57 Sealing of Weights and] 

Measures | 

Forestry — 

58 Insect Pest Extermination .... j 

59 Planting and Trimming Trees) 

60 Forest Fires | 

Other Protection of Persons andj 

Property — 

61 Bounties j 

62 | 
63 



$ 



Total from Protection of | 
Persons and Property 1$ 



3,025.72 



81.61 



403.21 
432.47 

1,194.91 

75.05 



5,212.971 



$ 5,212.97 



Total forward 



$2,909,327.94 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



25 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 


$ 214,542.61 

195,344.00 

11,352.95 

5,106.98 

7,351.64 

1,521.11 

3,253.00 
2,395.74 

3,157.22 

1,290.16 

73,168.67 
2,857.40 

5,593.71 

7,502.27 

150.00 

4.58 


$ 6,000.00 


$ 158,769.48 


Protection of Persons and 
Property forward 


Fire Department — 
25 Salaries and Wages 




26 Horses and Care of Same .... 

27 Equipment and Repairs 




28 Hvdrant Service 

29 Fuel and Light 

30 Maintenance of Buildings 

and Grounds 

31 New Buildings 

32 Other Expenses 

Fire Alarm Boxes— keyless 

doors 




Automobile Ladder Truck 
Chassis 




Autos, Fittings and Supplies 
Militia— 
33 Armories 




34 Rifle Ranges 




Inspection — 

35 Inspection of Buildings 

36 Inspection Wires 




37 Sealing of Weights and 
Measures 




Forestry — 

38 Insect Pest Extermination .... 

39 Planting and Trim. Trees .. 

40 Forest Fires 




Other Protection of Persons and 

Property — 
41 Bounties 




42 Fish Wardens 

43 Pound Keeper 








Total for Protection of Per- 









sons and Property |$ 534,592.041$ 6,000.001$ 540,592.04 



Total forward 



|$ 699,361.52 



26 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 
for 

Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 

8c Health and Sanitation: 

Health— 

64 Quarantine and Contagious 

Diseases 

65 Tuberculosis 

66 Miscellaneous 



67 Inspection 

Sanitation — 

68 Sewers and Sewage Disposal 

69 Sewer Construction | 

70 Refuse and Garbage Disposal} 

71 Street Cleaning | 

Sewer Connections I 



Other Health and Sanitation — 

72 Comfort Station 

73 



Total forward 



1,771,67 
1,077.52 



34.73 

3,822.24 

380.66 



607.42 



Total from Health and Sanita-| 
tion |$ 7,694.24 



$2,909,327.94 



$ 7,694.24 
$2,917,022.18 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



27 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 



lc Health and Sanitation: 

Health— 

45 General Administration 

46 Quarantine and Contagious 

Disease Hospitals 

47 Tuberculosis 

48 Vital Statistics 

49 Other Expenses 

Isolation Hospital 



50 Inspection 

a Inspection of School Chil- 
dren 

b Inspection of Animals 

c Inspection of Meat and 

Provisions 

d Inspection of Milk and 

Vinegar 

Inspection of Smoke 



$ 16,657.55 



11,016.09 
1,020.19 
9.970.44 



Sanitation — 

51 Sewer Maintenance and 
Operation 

53 Sewer Construction 

54 Refuse and Garbage Disposal 



Other Health and Sanitation 

56 Sanitaries and Public Con- 
venience Stations 



$ 92,426.71 



$ 699,361.52 



800.00 
500.00 



3,008.68 
315.91 



15,964.57 
94,391.04 



6,298.13 



69,291.67 



Total for Health and Sanitation j$ 159,942.60|$ 161.718.38 
Total forward ! 



$ 321,660.98 
$1,021,022.50 



28 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 
RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 



8d Highways: j 

74 General |$ 

75 Construction | 

76 Sidewalks and Curbing I 

(Granolithic) 

77 Snow and Ice Removal 

78 Sprinkling 

80 Miscellaneous 

Construction — Macadamizing 
Construction — Paving 



Total from Highways 1$ 



8e Charities: 

81 Almshouse or Town Farm . 
a Sale of Produce and Stock 

b Board 

c Miscellaneous 

82 Reimbursements for Relief 

Given 

a From Individuals 

b From Other Cities and 

Towns 

c From the State 

d From St. John's Hospital 

83 Reimbursements for Mothers' 

Aid 

a From Individuals 

b From Other Cities and 

Towns 

c From the State 

84 Municipal General Hospitals 

85 Miscellaneous 



$2,917,022.18 



593.26 



1,763.92 



601.94 



$ 1,763.92 $ 2.365.86 



$ 2,382.481 



20.50 1 

1,055.53) 

4.256.29) 

70.501 



Total from Charities !$ 7,785.30 

i : 

Total forward I 



1$ 7.785.30 
I $2,927,173.34 






AUDITOR'S REPORT 



29 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 



Id Highways: 

60 General Administration |$ 202,753.30 

61 General Highway Exp | 

62 Construction | 

63 Sidewalks and Curbing | 

64. Snow and Ice Removal | 

65 Sprinkling | 23.552.16 

a Water | 

b Other | 

66 Lighting | 119,879.47 

67 Other Expenses | 

c State Highway I 



95.757.07 



$1,021,022.50 



50.00 



Total for Highways 1$ 346,184.93 



le Charities: 

i 

68 General Administration |$ 5,951.87 

69 Almshouse or Town Farm ...J 104,401.29 

70 Outside Relief by City orj 

Town | 9,752.04 

71 Relief Given by Other Cities | 

and Towns | 1,549.14 

72 Mothers' Aid I 

a Relief Given by City orj 

Town i 45,389.06 

b Relief Given by Other] 

Cities and Towns j 924.10| 

74 Other Expenses I 18,457.051 



$ 95.807.07 



$ 441,992.00 



Total for Charities |$ 186,424.55 

I ! 

Total forward I 



$ 186.424.55 
|$1,649.439.05 



30 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 

8f Soldiers' Benefits : 

86 State Aid 

87 Military Aid 

88 Soldiers' Burials 

89 Soldiers' Relief 



Total from Soldiers' Benefits .... 



8g Schools: 

90 Tuition and Transportation 

of State Wards 

91 Other Tuition 

92 Sale of Text Books and 

Supplies 

93 Miscellaneous 

Vocational School 

School House Rents 

School Houses 

Newsboys' Badges 

Smith-Hughes Fund — Voca 

tional School 

Sale School Buildings 

Total from Schools 

8h Libraries: 

94 Fines, Rentals and Sales ... 

95 Miscellaneous 

Total from Libraries 

Total forward 



$ 52.608.72 
975.00 

689.75 



$ 54,273.47 



1,926 
8,393 



00 1 

751 



11.141 



19.890. 

1,005. 

18, 



io| 

00 1 
30! 



1,573.191 



!$ 



$ 32,817.481$ 



$ 



429.691 



429.691 



$2,927,173.34 



$ 54.273.47 



380.00! 



380.00 



$ 33,197.48 



429.69 



[$3,015,073.98 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 
PAYMENTS 



31 



OBJ ECTS OF PAYM ENTS 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Total 



Total forward I 

If Soldiers' Benefits: 

75 General Administration |$ 2,541.94 

76 State Aid j 11,000.00 

77 Military Aid j 1,766.00 

78 Soldiers' Burials I 

79 Soldiers' Relief I 14,643.87 

German War j 57,410.54 

Soldiers' Exemption I 33.08 

Soldiers' Graves | 239.70 

Total for Soldiers' Benefits |$ 87,635.13 

lg Schools: ! 

80 General Expenses j 

a Administrative Salaries !$ 3,500.00 

b Other General Salaries i 427,277.13 

c Other General Expenses ....j 28,477.55 

d Retirement Fund | 

82 Text Books and Supplies | 20,736.13 

84 Transportation | 1,438.20 

85 Support of Truants | 1,648.25 

87 Fuel and Light | 45,944.64 

88 District Police j 12,999.60 

89 New Buildings | 

90 Furniture and Furnishings ....j 904.79 

92 Other Expenses i 37,004.59 

Textile School I 20,000.00 

Total for Schools |$ 599,930.88 

lh Libraries: 

93 Salaries and Wages |$ 14.450.63 

94 Books, Periodicals, etc ! 3,400.15 

95 Binding I 1,159.44 

96 Light j 638.51 

97 Buildings | 

98 Other Expenses j 1,839.13 

Total for Libraries |$ 21,487.86 

Total forward ! 



$ 



$1,649,439.05 



$ 87,635.13 



141,776.52 



$ 141.776.52 



$ 741,707.40 



434.61 



434.61|$ 21,922.47 



$2,500,704.05 



32 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 

8i Recreation: 

96 Parks and Gardens 



$ 1,463.50 



Total from Recreation |$ 1,463.50 



Total forward 



$3,015,073.98 



$ 1,463.50 
I $3,016,537.48 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



33 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 






$2,500,704.05 




li Recreation: 

99 General Administration 


$ 9,963.67 

7,372.63 
2,794.35 

2,606.12 

600.00 
1,199.98 
1,429.76 

468.48 


$ 


648.73 
20,012.50 




a Salaries and Wages 




100 Parks and Gardens 




a Salaries and Wages 

b Improvements and Addi- 
tions •. 


• 


d Other Expenses 




101 Playgrounds and Gymnasia .. 
a Salaries and Wages 




b Improvements and Addi- 
tions 

c Other Expenses 




103 Celebrations and Entertain- 
ments 

a Fourth of July 

b Labor Day 

c Band Concerts 

d All Other 




Soldiers' and Sailors' Cele- 
bration ". 




Board Trade, Agricultural 
Ex 




Park Purposes 

Fairgrounds 








Total for Recreation 


$ 26,434.99 


$ 


20,661.23 


$ 47,096.22 


Total forward 






$2,547,800.27 



34 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

to 
Outlays 



Total 



Total forward 

8j Pensions: 

100 



8k Unclassified: 

101 Receipts not Recorded under 
Previous Classifications .. 

a Buildings 

b Insurance (on school) 



Total from Unclassified 
Total forward 



$ 2,403.16 



$ 2,403.161 



$3,016,537.48 



$ 2,403.16 
$3,018,940.64 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



35 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 






($2,547,800.27 


lj Pensions: 

104 Retirement made from : 

a Street Department 

b Police Department 

c Fire Department 


$ 1,658.64 
6,308.92 
7,548.10 


1 

1 

i 


d B'ldgs Department 

e Water Works Dept 


577.72| 
365.00J 




Total for Pensions 


$ 16,458.38 1 
1 


$ 16,458.38 


Ik Unclassified: 

105 Damages to Persons and 

Personal Property 

106 Memorial Day 

107 City and Town Clocks 


$ 4,036.11 

1,606.00 

50.00 

2,138.77 

• 

6,580.72 
4,761.24 
2,978.99 






110 Payments not Recorded tin- 
der Previous Classifica- 
tions '. 




a Printing City or Town Re- 
Reports and Binding 

b Veteran Firemen's Asso- 
ciation 




c Property Damages 

d Revision Ordinances 




Court Expenses 




Workingmen's Compensa- 
tion 




1916 Payrolls Allowed 
Tax Titles — bought by City 




Total for Unclassified 

Total forward 


$ 22,151.83 




$ 22,151.83 




1 


$2,586,410.48 



36 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 
for 

Expenses 


Offsets 

to 
Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 


$ 295,784.49 
80.60 




$3,018,940.64 


9 Public Service Enterprises : •••• 
104 Water 


a Income from Sale of 
Water 




b Miscellaneous 




105 All Other 




a Markets 


1 


b Public Scales 









Total from Public Service! 

Enterprises 1$ 295,865.09 



10 Cemeteries: 

106 Sale of Lots and Graves j 

107 Care of Lots and Graves ! 

108 Care of Endowed Lots (In- 

terest on Funds) | 

109 Miscellaneous 

Opening Graves j 

Recording and Miscellaneous! 



6,478.50 
5,177.98 



3,950.50 
122.25 



Total from Cemeteries 1$ 15,729.23 



11 Administration 
Funds : 
110 
111 
112 



Total forward 



of Trust 



|$ 295,865.09 



$ 15,729.23 



$3,330,534.96 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



37 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Total forward 






$2,586,410.48 




2 Public Service Enterprises: 

111 Electric — 

a Maintenance & Operation .. 
b Construction 


$ 237,148.26 
1,008.00 


$ 3,393.80 




112 Gas— 

a Maintenance & Operation .. 
b Construction 




113 Water— 

a Maintenance & Operation .. 
c Construction 




Purchase of Land 




114 All Other— 

a Markets 

b Public Scales 




c Docks and Wharves 

d Ferries 




e Herring and Alewife 
Fisheries 




f Miscellaneous 








Total for Public Service 
Enterprises 


$ 238,156.26 


|$ 3,393.80 


$ 241,550.06 


3 Cemeteries: 

115 Maintenance 

116 Improvements and Additions 

Total for Cemeteries 


$ 13,315.30 






|$ 13,315.30 




$ 13,315.30 


4 Administration of Trust 
Funds : 

117 
118 
119 

Total forward 


! 

1 

! 






! 1 


$2,841,275.84 



38 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 
for 

Expenses 


Indebtedness 


Total 


Total forward 


$ 8,077.68 
28,699.04 




$3,330,534.96 


12 Interest: 
113 On Deposits 


114 On Deferred Taxes 




118 On Public Trust Funds 

a Charity 




b School 




c Library 








Total from Interest 


$ 36,776.72 




$ 36,776.72 




13 Municipal Indebtedness: 

120 Loans in Anticipation of 
Revenue 




$2,000,000.00 
177,000.00 

968.07 




121 Other Temporary Loans 

122 Loans for General Purposes 

123 Trust Funds Used 




124 Loans for Public Service 
Enterprises 




127 Premiums 


i 


128 Unpaid Warrants or Orders 
of Current Year 


1 


Total from Municipal In- 
debtedness 




i 




$2,177,968.07 


|$2,177,968.07 


Total forward 


| 






| $5,545,279.75 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



39 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Expenses 



Indebtedness 



Total 



Total forward 
5 Interest: 



120 On Loans in Anticipation of 

Revenue J 

121 On Other Temporary Loans I $ 53,155.02 

122 On Loans for General! 



Purposes 

123 On Trust Funds Used 

124 On Loans for Public Service 

Enterprises 

125 On Loans for Cemeteries 



129,445.60 
2,168.00 

57,150.00 



Total for Interest 1$ 241,918.62 



6 Municipal Indebtedness: 

129 Loans in Anticipation ofj 

Revenue | 

132 Bonds and Notes fromj 

Revenue | 

a General |$ 412,621.30 

b Public Service Enterprises! 47,000.00 
c Cemeteries ! 



Total for Municipal Indebted- 1 
ness 1$ 459,621.30 



$2,841,275.84 



$1,750,000.00 



$ 241,918.62 



$l,750,000.00|$2,209,621.3e 



Total forward 



| $5,292,815.76 



40 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


■ 


Non- 
Revenue 


Total 


Total forward 

14 Sinking Funds: 

From Commissioners to meet 

Loans for — 
129 General Purposes 






$5,545,279.75 


130 Public Service Enterprises .... 

131 Cemeteries 
















15 Agency, Trust and Invest- 
ment Transactions: •••• 

Trust— 

136 Perpetual Care Funds 

137 Other Permanent Public 

Trust Funds 


• 


$ 9,225.00 
400.00 

3,440.35 




138 Income for Investment 

139 Private Trust Funds and 

Accounts 




John Tyler Trust Fund 




Total from Agency, Trust and 

Investment Transactions 

1 




$ 13,065.35 


$ 13,065.35 


Total forward 


! 1 


$5,558,345.10 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



41 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



for 
Revenue 



From Non- 
Revenue 



Total 



Total forward 



7 Sinking Funds : 

To Commissioners for Debt Re- 
quirements — 

137 From Taxes, Earnings, etc. ..|$ 30,500.00 

138 From Special Assessments ....] 

139 From Sale of Real Estate, etc.! 



$5,292,815.76 



Total for Sinking Funds |$ 30,500.001 



i _ 



8 Agency. Trust and Investment! 
Transactions : 

Agency — ■ 

140 Taxes | 

a State | 

b Non-resident Bank [ 

c County j 

141 Liquor Licenses Remitted to I 

the State | 

142 Abolition of Grade Crossings j 

143 All Other I 

Corporation Tax ! 

Trust— j 

144 Perpetual Care Funds I 

145 Other Permanent Public! 

Trust Funds | 

146 Income Invested I 

147 Private Trust Funds and| 

Accounts j 

Total from Agency, Trust and 1 
Investment Transactions | 

Total forward I 



$ 211,860.00 

11,740.43 

104,993.10 

36,209.00 
4,480.00 
2,631.31 



9,225.00 



$ 30,500.00 



$ 381,138.84 



$ 381,138.84 
$5,704,454.60 



42 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Temporary 
Accounts and 
Cash Balances 


Total 


Total forward 


$ 776.87 
7,361.31 


$5,558,345.10 


16 Refunds: 

148 Accrued Interest 


149 All Other (Overdrafts) 








Total Refunds 


$ 8,138.18 


8,138.18 




17 Transfers: 

150 Departmental 


$ 53,331.66 








Total Transfers 


$ 53,331.66 


53,331.66 






18 Balances: 

151 General 






152 Sinking Fund 




153 Investment Fund 




154 Perpetual Care Fund 




155 Other Public Trust Fund 




156 Private Trust Funds and Accounts 








Total Cash on Hand Beginning of Year 


$ 389,792.57 


$ 389,792.57 


Grand Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 




$6,009,607.51 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



43 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Temporary 
Accounts and 
Cash Balances 



Revenue 



Total forward 
9 Refunds: 



150 Taxes — Reassessed 

152 Special Assessments — Street Watering 

Total Refunds 



10 Transfers: 

158 Departmental 



Total Transfers 



11 Balances: 

162 Perpetual Care Fund „... 

163 Other Public Trust Fund 

164 Private Trust Funds and Accounts 



Total Cash on Hand End of Year 

Grand Total Payments and Cash on Hand 



I $5,704,454.60 



$ 11,278701 



$ 11,278701 11,27870 



$ 53,331.661 



$ 53,331.661 53,331.66 



$ 240,542.55 



240,542.55 



$6,009,607.51 



44 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Insurance 

Schools $1,963.87 

C. Hall 980.80 

Health 474.00 

Street 137.00 

Buildings 650.88 

Library 278.10 

Charity 1,074.99 

Police 349.00 

Parks (con. Buildings) 115.15 

Cemetery 55.50 

Water Works 2,504.27 

$8,583.56 

Transfers 

Various Departmental Transfers to : 

Police $ 910.60 

Health Yard 782.52 

Charity 660.46 

Purchasing Agent 756.90 

Engineering 6,654.82 

Street, Other Expenses 1,500.00 

Fire, Other Expenses 200.00 

Water Works, 5,108.80 

Buildings, Wages 1,179.44 

Buildings, Other Expenses 11,789.44 

Schools 23,025.49 

Claims 763.25 

$ 53,331.66 

These Municipal Transfers Deducted from Appropriations 

Band Concerts to General Expenses $ 247.24 

Camp Devens to General Expenses 1,000.00 

Health Office to Health Yard 2,000.00 

Insurance to General Expenses 600.00 

Liquor Licenses to Workmen's Compensation 600.00 

Paving and Widening Lawrence Street to Paving 1,444.44 

Purchase Land (Water) to Addition to Plant No. 2 4,770.51 

Street Sprinkling to Street Maintenance 3,446.49 

$ 14,108.68 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 45 

Expenditures from Building Appropriation 

School Houses $3&,222.37 

Fire Houses 4,737.47 

Building Dept. Stable 258.15 

Board of Health Stable 533.01 

Board of Health Hospital 325.97 

Comfort Station 855.21 

Carpenter Shop (Repair and Maintenance) 630.99 

City Hall 1,871.18 

City Hospital 2,976.49 

City Stables 827.98 

Isolation Hospital 461.88 

Lighting Station 3.46 

Memorial Building 515.86 

Police Station Stable 870.85 

Rifle Range 632.66 

Building Inspector \ 2,000.00 

Building Deputy Inspector 1,673.02 

Coffin Construction 817.13 

Clerical Work 2,576.77 

Elevator Inspector 636.75 

Gas Piping Inspector 1,302.52 

Janitors at Police Station 2,975.55 

Janitor at Memorial Hall 1,027.00 

Office Supplies 420.05 

Pensions and Compensations , 2,182.20 

Stock on Hand 2,974.51 

Tools 583.93 

Transportation 7,418.10 

Vacations .- 2,351.54 

General Expenses 6,052.61 

$88,715.21 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF LOWELL, MASS. 



BALANCES 
APPROPRIATIONS 
CASH RECEIPTS 
TRANSFERS 
PAYMENTS 



From January 1, 1918 to December 31, 1918 



H 
W 

m 

< 

Q 

J/2 

H 

Ph 

w 

W 

P3 

of 
o 

►—4 

H 

< 

Ph 

o 
& 

Ph 

Ph 

I 

w 

> 

w 



CD 
CS 

c/2 



Ph 

o 

o 



o 



o " 



O^OOi— lONMOOOOOOOOOOVOOOO'-HOTt^H 

qMONNN^qooqocH-tqqq^qifl^ 
dr'JdN'aoi^dioddd^'TONdddfvi^'-t'ts 

0\OtV)KiOOMO OOOOiOHi-OTHO\fOaN 
lo>-Oi— iOnO'TNOi-h u^Om^O\MfOOOiOKNM^t- 



o lo 






69- 



o 

CM 



—i ON 
CM co 

nno" 
cmn 



N lo cm cm 
i— i CMN CM 



o 
o 



'M 



CO CM 

CM i—i 



n 

LO 



69- 



o 

NO 

o 

T—H 

On 



69- 



CM 

lo 

CM 

OO 

N 



rr 



NO 

o 

NO 
NO 



69- 



9 o 



cq o 



"3 NO 
<u NO 

C CO 



i- 1 69- 



ONOOOOnOcoOOOOOOO^TOOOi— lOrKX) 

qtNiqoqr- inooooooo — iqoqqtq^N 
d r; d d ^' d d d iri d d d d -t d o d d m' ^- ^t m' 

O 0\ O O O "T Onlo OOOOi/)fO'tCHO\fOO\(N 

lo no lo io ^^tfOoomKNCNirs 
n lo" cvf i— T cm" go" i-* 

i— i CMrv, cm cm i— ' 



LO LO i— ^ON NO^lo NO 

lo" ^" lo"o"n 



o 
CM 



co 
NO 
O* 



Tf O lo -T ^ 
' O cd CM* N* 

CN "T i—i 

LO CO LO 

t" 



o 

CM 



o 
o 



CO 
N 

IN." 
LO 



u 


Tl-VOOCOOCrlOOO 

fOMqioM.xqqio 


1 


vdrod^dcAC^dd'^' 
lo on o co n Lo on lo 

O LO i— J 00 O Tt" VO_i— I 


y. 


lo" rt no"n"n" 
o 

CM 



lolocoo'Oi— i o o i— ir^^i— i 
itioinrHTro\qq^tc\jiofo 

d n d ^t d in d d cm' d ^-' k 

!\]ir,OOlOr-lHOOO\HC\N 

lo NO On 0\CM_co CO lo N CM cm ^ 

no" o" cm' cm" cm" od cm" 

i— i CM N CM CM i—i 



\OOrfOONOt^OOO 

HoaqqoooioNioo 

CO O* i— <* 00 O cd O O CM lo cd 

rHOt^H'tlflrHl^CN^ 

co T i",»- 1 o oq^cM ^rco ■**■ 
no" cm* i-Ti— T^j-" r< 

^T ,— I i— ( VO 



CD 

o 



N O o o 

CO O O O 



o Noooa 

CO HrHrtlt 



CM 

LO 

Tt-' 

On 
CO 



NO ON O ON O O NO 00 

HqioqqooqqN © 

CO O "3- o" ©' rf © ©' cm' cd 

OCOMOOO^Cm CO 
CM "3-1— i O CO lo CM O CO 



NO CM 



o 



o 

VO' 



o 

LO 
LO 

i—i ON 

LO Tj" 

no" 
69- 



o © o 

O O co 

od^f' o 

T— I Tf 1—1 



o 

LO 

lo" 

ON 



\OCtOCNCifC 00 
i— iOOnOOOONloN O 

cd O i— ' O no co ON O CM co 

i— io^i-ono^coi— i lo co 

co ^t" i—i ON no CM ^CO 

no" cm" i-Ti-T'-r" rC 

■^" T— I 1-H LO 

I 



^ CO 

> 



be 



be 



g (U (fl 



a; 



uTW 
o 

rt O 



U 5 .;W S 



S5oS 



^o 



*T3 tu" 



u 



bJO 



^WxW 



n 'o . rt <f O oj O 



•2.2 

<U <L) 

& 5. 



v O 

o o 



as 



o ^ 

■x c 

o O 

(Li 'X 
O. CJ 

(^ oj 

G Oh 



1) 

C/j 






£ _v .'C . 



u 



Oh 

Q 



en 



o 



(U 

bo 
a3 



CO 

+-( a; 
0J > 

>,"iy5 "to 



u 



0-07: 



on <h on ^ O PQ P^ co 



rt <u o 



r-l t>. Tt 



fe 



1— 1 CO On 1— 1 cm 

1— I T— I 

rvj CM CM CM CM 



\\" 



CM co^l-LONO i—i CNJ 1—1 CMCOTJ-LONOLOCMOO 

I I I I I I I I 1 1 II I II I 

CO CO co CO CO LO lo NO NO NO NO NO NO 00 IT co 



CM 

00 

LO 

o 

NO 

c\f 

LO 

NO 

^5- 



NO 

o 



CM 

o 



^r 



X 

LO 

CO 

LO 

CO 
cm" 



On 

l—( 

q 

1—1 
CO 

o 



LO 



o^ 
n" 

T— ( 



o 

CO 
N 
CO 

LO 
N 



CM 

o 

CO 

NO 

o^ 

lo" 

"T 

NO 



Oh 

re g 

E^ W 

-« 

U u 

e >oH 



OOOi— iOOO»-0 0\OOvCOO 
OOOOOLOOOroiOTfOroOO 

dddioTtddr-i't'fsld'-'iod 

lOiONi-^IOOOfO^OOfOfOO 
MrHQ\foroiO-tOrOCCMN^O 

u-T i— TcvT-rf lo' r-*oo' CM*lo*lo* \OCm' «-H 
r- I »— I t— I 



o 
o 

cm* 

oo 

69 



o 

On 

NO- 
LO 

69- 



© © © t-h O O O to Os o o \© oo 

OOOOC^OOOcolo^O^OO 

©> O O lo ^t © O ^h' n" t< O Tf' lo' o 

ifl^jKT'NlC^COrO^OOKfOO 
W --* C\_ro fO 10 "t O ^_ O © ^f iO O 

u-fr-TcM' Tf'i-o' ,— <* od cm* io'lonci—* ih* 

r-H t— I T-H 

69- 



O 
On 

LO 

69- 



T— I 
r O 



oc 
69^ 



i— 'r< 

<o 

CO 



69- 



Oi— i 
nOnO 



NO 



CO 
LO 


oo o 

CM O 


ON 


CO 

CO 

LO 


LO 


on 

ON 

69- 



OOO^trHOOCMr,C\OMvCXO 
O\q00M l O T t ,v 3r0 l ^xt-'^f0tsO 

©' CO 0\j LO ^t O] CO r-n' Tf l< NO r-H ^f' LO* 

iOTfOi-' N )ONG\C< y )\0'-TOCOO\ 
irTr-T cvf -^J-' id* r-" 00 CM~LO*LO* nO* CM* 

69- 



CM 
LO 

CO 

©^ 

CO 
69" 



CD 

o 

•I— I 



CD 

o 



s 

o 
o 



C2 









: "J 












: cu 












: bJO 












: rt 












!ss 


c« : 








J r. 


cu : 








: G 


fcjO : 








: O 


aJ : 








: as 


& | 








: «-. 




: / 


i c/ 


'■ ? 


: t"5 


+J" : 


: a. 

: b 


: cl 

: c 


: £ 

: ° 


o ; cjo 


53 : 


: a 




: n 
1^ 


: <D 

: -O 


be : 
< : 


: v 


: j 




• as 


bjp : 


CL 

• i- 


> u 

. • r 


. .• i 


. r-> 


/ 





cu 

a: 



oW 2W 



§o 



a! • 

to 



'cu • ► . f" . u . 

< u 3 a, 



o o 

J2 O 

as rn 
J W 

«H-H -*- 1 
-4— ' • — 

cu 3 



CO 



<-M 



lo co 



to 

fan 

•F-H 

H 



o 

I 

CO 



l-O O O r— I r— I O O 

co O O^Olo o o 

nddafodd 

CO O O O". LO o o 

CO <0 O r- ^ O LO O 

■*t \o »-T u-T cm' »— * o~ 

i-h ^t\co CM CM 

r— I r-H 



o 

o 

CM 
CM 

^>9- 



© 

o 



CM 



co r^ 
""*" ^°. 

ION 

CO CO 

CM 



V* 



io co 

CO ID 

r-4 ©' 
CM 



mKfOHrHir,K 
co to CO O to vo rf 
"*t •<& CM* On CO CO On 

CO^ On. t^ »— i © "^f co^ 

■^■'iD'OlD'CvfrH C\ 
rHtHNCO CM r-i 

1— t 1-H 

69- 



rt 



rt 



OJ 



bJD.S 
C OS 



cu 

bo 

OS 

be 






1^ 

Is 

r O 

i — i 

O 

CO 

to 



c 

© 



CM 
4/> 



CM 


© 




CM 


OO 


© 




CO 


^-' 


cd 




■"st" 


lO 


o 




LO 


MD 


LO 




r-( 


\0 


r-T 




CO* 


69- 






69- 


COOOr-li-H 


© © 


LO 


lo © © \q lo © © 


nO 


-tcdod co 


© © 


vc 


© © ©r^Lo © © 


co 


LO © ©_ VO © LO © 


^s. 


oTvo 


r-i co CM 


r-H © 


r— 1 


i—i 


l\ CO 


CM CM 


r^ 




1-H 


l-H 


<0 


69- 






69- 



OO 
69^ 



-f 

CM 

On 
VO 

0\* 

CO 
69 



b£ 



rC 

be 



OJ 

c 

rH L, +j" ^" 4J 

.^" CU <L> CU CU 

cjo > v r^ v r~" ^ 

G *** ^ ^ u ^ 

Wcncn C/2 CD 



© CO 



CM 



CO 



•i-t 
o 



?/2 

H 

< 

Pn 

S 
<j 

xn 
H 

P-i 

W 
PS 

GO 

O 

H 
<j 

P4 
O 

Pn 
Ph 
<$ 

I 
W 

> 



M 

OJ 

03 

CU 
r-t 

Ph 

CU 
H 

O 



4 



p. 

a 



.r, a 



U 



M 



O ^f O -3" CM 

i— ( t-h O O fO 

cm co O LO CNJ 

ON co O CO lo 

00 000 00 co 

cvf "^ vo' r^f lo~ 

OrO O 
CM ro 

69- 



GN <X) 
^1- co 

^t cm" 

COLO 

as 

CM 

69- 



o 
o 

CM 

69- 



T3 3 O O 
<U g r- 1 O 

« £ cm" © 

£tf °°-°~ 

S CM CO 

a p ©<-o 



o 

GO 
CO 

o 



CM 

69- 



M P 



HON 

co o «-" 

roo-t 

NO O ON 



\0 t- ' 



►-> 



69- 



o 

LO 



ON 



69- 



i-jvqoo 

CM* GO O CM 

OsrOOiO 
CO r^O^K 
rM~^t r NO~oC 
OCO '—i 
CM co 

69- 



CM 

CO 

cm' 

LO 

fO 



«■ 



O 

o 
o 

CM 
CD 

rC 

CM 



.5? »-■ 
cj <U 

a "■"" 

5- w* 

■v i-* u o 

a && 

>WH u u £ 
o> x «u ti ti k 03 



d ^ 

I 
CM 



co i— i CM 



O 
NO 
CM* 

°\ 

LO 
LO 
69" 



CO 

no' 

CO 



O 
CO 

69- 



00 
CO 

o 
<*\ 

LO~ 

69- 



CM 

on 
°° 

Lrf 

CO 
CM 
69- 



ON 

CO 

LO^ 

4^- 



CO 
00 



W- 



CO g 
CMU 



o 

On 

LO CJ 



'O 



O NO 

,oc 

ON*f< 

ON CM 

n3 cu 



rt 



-O "- 

a c 

<u 5 

ud o 

o 

O u 



M 

(U 
Ph 
O 

o 

•I— I 

p-( 



OOOON^i-coOOCviONOOr^sOOCOOOOOOO 
OOONO v OLOLOiOt^O s cO'— iloOOO. oooooo 

o o o Lo' no o cm' t< ^i" i— <' nc »—' \d tv! o r>! o o o o o o 

OOOOLONO'— >G0LO0CC0CX]C0LOL0l-OO'— iMOCOr- 1 

^r co T ^'— i on lo on co cm^cm^no^cm co r^ no;o_ . ocnioco 

Tf l—> CM O Tj-'l-O 'XJ ^f" lOr- *T— T Lo't-HCOLo' 

»— I t— I LO CO •— I »— I 



o 
o 



co 



Tf CO 

On On 

r^ co 



OOOON^t-coOOCO'— 'oor^^t-ocooooooo 
O O C5 vq^ NO lo iO lo CM ^O co »-h io t- JOONOOOOOO 

O O O lo* no" O CM t^." lo' cm' no — " no' f^»" o" t^.' O O CO o o o 
OOOOLONO^- iG0r^O><O)r\) f y^u- J L0LOO'— i (N| 30 O o 

""*" "^ T ^' — ' °\ ir l ON rooi; ^°^ co t>> f^co o omo_o 

-^ r «-T CMO* CO*cO*CN) rf io»-h»— r lo*i— Tco'lo* 

T-H ^H LO CNJ 1— I r- ( 

60- 



NO O 
On co 
Lo'rr 

CO co 



69- 



^t- o 
Colo 

ON—" 

CM 

oo 



o 
o 



LO 

o 



NON 
CO Tf; r-i 

r-i 'to 

NO 



1- o 
or>. 

T}" LO 

NO NO 

co CM 



69- 






O On "t co O NO cnj O O O 1^ ^t On CO O O O CO O CO 
COnONOlolonO^)CncOt-ilo»— iMOCCOr- iNOCO 

O lo no' O CM' t~N.' co r-i no' H^Ni-KOOOCJodd Tf 
OO'OO- 1 ts. co CO co cn| co iO '+ lo O C^)^\0^■^1" 
Tf r-H ON lo ON co "t cvj NO^ CM CO^ t^» NO^ CO O^ O CM ON t-h 

1— T cm" O co' lo' CM' ^f* LO t-h' r-T lo' 1-4 CM lo' 

i— I r-H 1 O CO •— I r— < 



^i 



<u 



o 

u 



w 



TO 

u 



CO 



cu 
CJG 

CTJ 

of 

ccQ 



CU 
CTJ 



CU 



C/] 



.sw 


in 


u'W 


C/1 " 


^w 


cW 


T3 


«<J . 


cu 


-C . 


to£i . 




30 


^O 


rtfO 


oO 


"CO 


PQ 


> 


CU 


3 


^ 



u 



"0 




CU 




a 


> 


oc 


.t: 




U 


cu 




_u 


1 




VI 




u 





■v 


Ph 






'0 


-4-> 

u 


PQ 


'u 





01 



c^ 



CM CM CO CM CM 



NO 

NC 

CO 
co 
CM 

cm' 

69 



O 
© 



CO 
69- 



CM 

00 

oc 

NO 
ON 
CM 

r" I 

69 



M" 

00 

ON 
LO 

ON 



69 



LO 

NO 



69 



& 



© 



r-l 

69 



o co o o 
qvqoo 


CO 
VO 


© cm" © © 

qfoqo 

V3- 


cm 

© 

Lo" 

CM 

69- 


o 

LO 


o 

LO 


CO 

VO 


CO 
vO 

*3- 



69- 



o 

•I— I 
+-> 

a 
<v 



CD 



O co O O 
OhOO 

Cts © O 
O co O lo 
OvOOvo 
t— Tlo* vo" 

69- 



O 

o 

CM 

69^ 



CO 

CO 

vd 

CO 

o 



69- 



CON 
lo CM 

ON »— i 
ON 



r^ fON co 
vq vq rf; t>. 

co' cm' ©" od 

or^ o -t- 

On_co_^vO 
GnVClo" 



69- 



Oh 



o3 O 



<u : 

CO : 

rt : 


"OP 


-w 


oJ 


X 


tn . P 


^ . 


-**0 


^o 





Oh d,U 



^H ^ CO 



COCO 



69^ 



1\ 

CO 
CM 
CO* 

69- 



o 
o 

cm 

CM 

69- 



! *L 



o 

LO 
LO 

CO 
co^ 
co" 
CM 
69- 



s 

o 

"o 
o 

o 



© co O VO o 
ONO^O 


O 


© t< © -t-' o 

O OO On O 


c\i 

o 

CO 


<— i »— i O On O 
^1- CM co CM 
-i-i-i 
69- 


cm" 

CM 

69- 



ON 

CO 

LO 

69- 



ON 
CO 

LO^ 

69- 



on 
*** 


ON 


LO* 

CM 

o 


LO 

CM 

©^ 


co' 
CM 


co" 
CM 
69- 


O^tONC 
OMO^O 


^ 


$441,600 

98,582. 

30,000. 

7,521, 

20,000, 


co' 

O 

ON 
LO 

69- 



J-O 

Tf- 

CM 
CM 

LO 



oo 
CM 

co 



69- 



co co lo VO O 
rnMoroq 

t< {< r< -^ © 

r^. © c^ on o 

r^vo ^cqo^ 

O'rHOOCNC* 

CO CM CM CM 

-1- *-■ 
69- 



be 



CM 
CO 

lo 

CO 

cm" 

69 



vo' 

LO 

ON 
On" 

o 

vo 
69- 



0J3 



rt 



o +- rp 
co > H 



^ CM 



PI 

pj 

o 
o 

Ph 



oo 



OLOOOOOOOOT-l-fr-lON 

OLOC5000000COCXJCOLO 

d^dddc'dddN'-N n-' 

OCMOOOOLOOONONOLOCM 

o vo vo cm o ^t " i— i , t'- , > tscqoq 

O* ,— <'»—(" vo'^t"^t"Lo"o" 

r— I CO r— I .— I 

69- 



00 

ON 

©" 



69- 



00 

a 
c5 

-t- 

. — > 



LO 


LO 


CM 


CM 


ON 


ON 


LO 


LO 


t^ 


r^ 


69^ 


69- 



OLoooooooor^vo'ooN 

O lo O O O O O O O ^t; CM O lo 

o cm" O O O O O O O lo O co" ^ 

OC-aOOOOLOOO-— ic\jc>CM 

O^VO VO CV^O^Tf rHrHTf- ON VO V\ CO 

O t— " y— " 'o" CO* "3"* ^" O 

i— i co '- 1 '- ' 

69- 



CO 



CM 

o 



69 



LO 

CM 

69- 



OOt^ 

-ti-h'K 

■^- o^ vo 

^h CM 



OLOOCOOO'OOO^f-^t'-HON 
OloOOnOOOOO'-^CMcolo 

O CM* O ON O O O VO* ON* O i-h" cm' Tf 
OCVJOOnOOloloOOvOloCM 
O VO VO '-^O'^- »— i CM r ONt^CO^C» 
<o" t-T r-T vo" co' -^t" LO* CD 

i— i co '^- , i— • 

69- 



ON 

<o 
CM 

-r 

-r' 
co 

69^ 



co 

CM 

69 



ON 
I— ( 

CM 

O 

69- 



CO 

LO 

O 
lo' 

co 

^9 



'X, 

■gW 

go 
u 



3 



04 



<£ 



>>-2 



o 

°Q.2 
•5 in o 

L- O C 

P -O jr 1 

O 03 i rH 



°^ 



c/ioo "J 



u, O 



P ° n 
P en O 

o PU 

0<m-i 
m X O 

"cW G 
<L> O 



en P 

- P^ 

^ p .5 u 



a 



^ o P ^ 

>JU>OW 



CM 



CO^tVOKOOO\T)-rHTtlOVO 



i— c CO CO 00 00 CO 00 CO "i" ^ ^t* 'i" 



5=1 

•PH 

o 



H 
W 

I* 
< 
to 

P 

< 

m 

H 

Ph 
►— i 

W 
o 

W 

P3 

of 

o 

H 

pel 
Ph 
© 

to 

1 

> 



GO 

cu 






C5 



o vo o 

'5 ^^ 
7" 2 U^N 

H 2 ^°° 

a 69- 

a 
< 



co 
00 

•0 



on 
cm' 



js a 

U v 

Cm 



O 
O 

co" 
69- 



ci 3 coo 

d <u • ~^ 
•r > 00 
£ <u 10 o 



«•> „ 



co 
CO 



M 



CM 

co 



69- 



CO 

CO 

vo 



ON 

cm' 



CO 

10 



coco 
VOCM 

ON 
in CO 

^o 

«-H 

69" 



VO 

^-' 

CO 



<u o CU 



•ro >> 



►J 

a u t-h 

0:2 o W 

K^. Ot- h 

• bJO C *-j'C 
• - . £. rt c/> O 

£^££ 8^ 

hh Ph P^ 

T-H CM <0 



On 



on 



ON 




N 




VO 




"-j- 




ON 




co 




N 




tj- 




o_ 









<o~ 




oc 




CM 




T-H 




69^ 




60 




"-j- 




co 









CM 









On 




n. 




CM 




00^ 




N 




co" 




■in 




69- 




»-H 
6> 




co 








vo 








O 








LO 








n 








00" 
















69- 








CM 




"* 




O 




CM 




ON 




on" 




lO 




f-H 




<f 




<o 




69H 




cn{ 
69- 




CM 




n 




^M 




•»— j 




1< 




«o" 




tO 




ro 




T-H 




r^ 












T-H 




Tf 




69- 




<& 




n 









rf 




CO 




cm' 




10' 




CM 




T— H 




ON 




CO 












T-H 




CO 




CM 




r-H 




69- 




^> 


xn 






<J1 


<v 






<v 


b/D 




in 




Ph 
Ctf 




•i-H 

cl> 








H-> 

CD 


TS 




s 


U 


CD 

X! 




CD 




•rH 




O 


^ 


Ph 




1 

T— I 


J 


1 




T-H 


l-H 


1— 1 



CM OO 
MO co O 

COr-H O 

^O CM O 

r^. jo 10 
^■"cnTo" 

CO y— 1 CO 

63- 



o' 
00 

co 

t< 

CM 

VO 



fMOO 

vq co o 

CO l-H O 

Kvom 

Tf'CM'o 

CO --h CO 
i-H Tf 



C^l 

ON 

Ox 

CO 

00 

tC 

CM 
VO 
#3- 



MOO 

vq co o 

CO'i-h o 

vo cnj o 

1^ VJO LO 

CO i-H CO 



CM 

ON 

G\ 

CO 
CO 

tc 

CM 

VO 






CM CM CM 



09 

O 

O 
TO 
09 

s 

(X 

H 






en 
Ph 

OX) 

< 



CO 



OCO OOt— 1 

<q Tt i-H co 


ON 

00 


O O co O i-h' 
VO On On 00 co 
CO^ CO On rf VO 


10 


r- r^H'^t'^f'rxr 

^H^H O 

CM t-H 


10' 

CO 
CO 
69- 



O CO O O T-H 

cq tj- t-h co 


On 
CO 


O O CO O t-h' 
VO O- ON CO CO 
00^ CC ON ^t VO^ 


10 

00_ 


i-H s i-Trf > rt"'csf 

r-HrHO 

'M t-i 
60- 


10" 

CO 
CO 
69- 



10 

o 
o 

T-H 

69- 



O co O O t— 1 

cq t^ t-h o co 

O O co' O t-h 
VO -rf ON CO CO 
CON. ON ^f VO 
T-Tr-Trf TfCvf 
T-H r-H O 
CM T-H 

69- 



c 
o 
10 

69- 



CO 

Tt-' 
o 
N. 

to' 

CO 
CO 
69^ 



crj 






X 



f in 
0JD >> 

« t> m ^ 

0J fj W H 



TO CTj 



X 



Ph^ W 

^ C TO ^ 

o g £ 






CM cold vo 



co CO co co co 



XJ1 

H 

< 
P4 

P 

H 

w 

o 
W 

of 

o 
H 

O 
Pui 

1 

w 

K 
W 
> 

3 
■ 



09 



Pui 

O 

H 

o 



o 



^^ 


O 
O 


Total 
ropriati 

73,531 
72,588 


O 

O 
O 

CM 


< 




LO 

ON 





5 



I 69- 



69- 



U 



LO 
ON 



69- 



■r > 

a v j 



— ' 



IN 

■^f cm 















<3 





69- 






l-H 





q 

cm 


ON* 
1—4 

co* 

O 



<U 



69- 



IN NO 

O NO 



©»-H 

^f NO 

5 69- 

c 



o 
o 

o 
o 
r^ 

c\T 



W 



u 
3 


IN l-H 

VON 


O 

O 


-r 
c 


1— ' NO* 
On <>0 
CM 1— ^ 


O 
O 

co_ 


a. 

X 


On"t-h" 

non 


CM 



69- 



CO 

*N 

1—1 

O 

00' 
69- 



00 



NO 
69" 



g 

ft 



O' 



O' 



bfl 
o — 5"S 

-t-j It •-* c/5 
U c/J O >- 

; 

o o ~ 

J o o 

C/i 1— 1 ►— 1 



^h CM co 



£ co co co 

£ ^ 5 



cJ 



!>> 

0JD 

•l-H 

w 

R 

OS 



+-i 

CO 



o 



CO 



t\ co co'O O 
ON lo On •— ' O 


r^ co 


LO 


$59,893, 

25,928. 

5,489. 





LO 

Cm" 


cvicxi 

NOLO 

<Ot-H 

co" 


CM 

q 

On 




NO 






O 

NO 


CM* 

in 






CM 

tN 
IN. 



69- 



^> 



h'P3 



X 



O 
v) o 



C^^foCO 03 
'S 4> S OJ biD^ 

S 03 ^f^ <U 

nsJ5 ^^ rt ^ 



f^S^> 



X 



bo 



»-« eg co ^1" NO IN 00 
Tf tJ- rt- -"^f- T -3- ^T 



<& 









00 

00 


-r'o -^r" 

■^1- O NO 






00 



NC_ 


r— 1 1_o'lo" 

>-0 CM 






00 
^9- 


^O co On O O 
ONm^TrHO 


^ O 

r^ co 


ON 

O 


NO 00 LO 

t\ CM CM 

nC__On CO 


O 

O 

LO 


CM CM 

NO LO 


NO 
NO^ 


no" 


CNj" 


co' 


co" 

l-H 

6e- 


NO »— 1 Tf O 

CO O O i—i 




ON O 

NO co 




LO 


OtJ-'i-I 

00 CM 0O 

^- CM 




CM CM* 

co O 


O 

CM 
CM 



69- 



i-H CM ON 

NO LO 00 


O 

O 


LO O 

00 


IN 




co'^t-'od 

— ' 
oq_ 00 fM^ 


O 

O 

LO 


00 

CO LO 


O 


Onlo"lo" 
LO CM 
69- 


cm' 


cm" 


LO~ 

ON 

69- 



rt 

•iH 

o 
O 



H 

< 

P 

< 
Xtl 

H 

w 

w 

of 
o 

H 

<J 
1— 1 

Pn 
o 

PM 

Ph 
«3 



p 

> 
3 

I 

© 



a 
^> 

cs 

p 

'o 
o 

,rt 
o 

C/3 



c 


CO 


00 


CO 





00 


CO 


"O 


X 


r< 


10 


On 


— 1 rt 


CM 


rf 


t^ 


rt 'C 


on 


t>* 




,° S 


•0" 


10" 




H 2 


r-^ 







£_ 


^3- 


»— < 




a 








< 




O 




7) 




O 




+? 









.C.S 




00 




en aj 




CO 




rt 

U w 




&> 




rt 









hJ 



w 



co 

o 

o\" 
<* 



On 
OO 

cm 

10 

00 
cm" 

CO 

T— ( 

60- 



o 
o 

© 
00 

CO 











C8 W 








■ *H £. 
















1-1 








<2 








>*H 










CO 


00 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


O 


V M 








a 


t< 


to" 


On 


C w 


CM 


^O 


r^ 


rt 


On 


CO 


?— 1 


"rt B 








no 


10 




pq £ 


r^ 


O 














■&e- 








© 


r^ 


O 


^r 


NO 


cq 


T3 


CO 


CM* 




£ 


y— i 


VO 






°i. 


1— 1 




X 


rC 


co~ 




1) 


CM 


T— 1 




c 


«/3- 







CM 

CO 
to 

of 

On 



00 
CO 

on 



ON 

O0 

CM 

r^ 

^f 

cm" 

00 



CO 

NO* 

© 

^3- 



CM 

to 



&- 






c • c 
— o 
U °U 

aj O 

c m - <-> 
£ c 'oco'O 

> 3 C rj 

iv! O rt X rt 

3< £ ~ 

£ bfl be 2 
c ^ c ° 
C « C a 

'3 ^'2 00 
cr cr 

< < 



1/3 



rt 

& 



a; 

O 



CO 



H CM 



»0 CM Tf Tf 

C^i CM* r- OC 

OMOKVO 
CO CM co O 

^i-h'cM 0~ 
CM 



I to 

i ^ 

CO 

10 

rt 

CM 

^3- 



LO CM ^ ■"+■ 

^_ »-; t^ 00 
cvj cm' 1— ! 00 

CO CM CO O 
CM 



tn cm rf •"'t- 

-=f T-H t>j CO 

CM CM y-i \6 
CO CM CO 

i-Tcvf 



&■ 



o 

o 



CD 



o 
10 



o 
0" 

CM 



o 

rt I- 

(U •—! 

CO - 



^ 



! 0h 

<u O 
^^ 

rt c 
J^ rt 



rt 

w 

Ch'O 

X O 



^d 



bfl 



rt a 

P-tPtH 



CM co Tf to 



CO CO CO 00 



to 

CO 

to 



10 
to 



to 

cm" 

1—1 

o 
o 

CM 



5h 
5=1 

as 
a> 

•t— ( 

O 
O 



O 



00 Oto 

06 o o 

COrlN 
CM ^t 
^3- 



O Oi— 1 
CO Oto 

CO o o 
O ON 

cm" ^f 



to 

CO 

co" 



000 

CO o o 
06 Oto 

o 000 
cm" 

£9- 



bfl 



o 
U 



CM 








CO 


rt 


-£ 




Ih 


J 


rt 




■4-' 
rt 




LO 

rt 





"C 




Ih 




2 




3 


•d 


Oh 




Ph< 
CM CO 



00 



CO 









On 




to 



CM 


l-H 

CO 




On 


0! 

tN." 




to 

O 
CM 


to 




^O 


to' 

CO 

co" 




CM 




CO 




to 

co 


CO 

On 
co_ 




c<- 
w 

V 

C 
C 

•— 


>• 




<v 

q=j 
• 1— i 

C/3 
CO 

as 

•— * 


rt 

P 
1 


*rt 

a 
'0 
"S 




1 


1 







.a o 

p 
go 



o 

I— I 

H 

H 
•— i 

o 



o 
o 
o 

> 



o ^ 

la 

^7 O 



\0 t— ii^C^tfO'- if^fO <N ON 

\OrHvqi-H0OrHTfO\vO On 00 

On co' O inJ CN K fO id O On tt* 

rHrlf^ON^COCMlO 00 LO 

\q_ <o k cq on oq rN ^r k ex ex 

t—Ti— <*t— i lo cc > co*rN,*^t*oo* *n* lo* 

rOOOKniDMCNCO'-i CM co 

^C ro ^j t— i lo NO CO 
60- 



00 CM 

a; w to 
u o> • 

15 £ J- 

r£ o r^ 

i- T-H 

60- 



ON 

00 

Tt" 
in, 

LO 

on" 



o 
o 

cm* 
in, 

CM 



^CCM ^1" 

oq o cm 

'—i On ON 

CM Tj- co 

CM" 



O s . OO ^1 i-O co r\i On f\i k 
00 T; On OO fN »— J CO i— i CM «-h 

tN,' no" ^t" no' no* t^I in cm" in! co 

lo on ^j- co <— i^o^ioi- i rN. 



in »— 1 1— ( r\i 



T-H^ 



60^ 



K 



CM CM ON O ~ OKr^NOCN) 

qio^toqoNioKoq rf co on 
oo' '"o" cm cm" r-iino'io cm' lo on 

>ON0NOO00iDK(NJrHC0 
<Op O O^ O CO On CD On co^OO 

in— «* On o't- 'co* oTu-Tr-Tco't^T 
TtoOKOMN.CMOCOCM'— 'CM 
NO co in r— I o no 

60- 



l-O 

o 

.o" 
m 



OO 

o 
in 

CO 
co 



>> 






>> 

rt 

£ 

X 



- 



be u ^ 



:£§' 



O g 



cj <n 



en u 

3 rt 



j. 5-1 en r3 



i*TH 



c 
2 



u S *2 "= u S 

• — — JJ • — W i • — 

2 rt "«^ i*3 h 2 c ^ 



H 



u 

x 






e 


CM i- 


NO'OfOaCCNNM 


ON 


lO 


ooo'tvoo^ooq^q^fON 


OO 


CM 




lo o r>! cnj' od f\i c\i od on oo on 


-r 


O 


— cS 


ONrOrirofNlOKK'^OO 


LO 


"* 


CB-- 


«c 


i— 'OnCnjocolOOOOO 


00 


IN. 


P 9: 


C\f <~Nl O «-T f\J lO O j' LTj' CO co in" 


lo' 


NO* 


H £ 


iO0000iOKCNJCN100(NJ'-irvj 


ro 


fN 




NO 


COLO i— 1 


NO sO 


CO 


LO 


a 


w- 








co' 


< 










69 




O 


O-HCOC.CO^ftO 




y- H 




o 


O OO O lo »— i On O CNJ 




00 


<r 


p_! 


NO* MO* O 


co co O O On 




o 


** 


CM 


-t- ro 1-h 


no tN, -rf r^ cm 




ON 


-f-.'r 


NO 


CM ^h co ^*»0 i-H 00 JN. 




o 


52 t> 


^_r 


r _r 


»— 1 t-I COLO 




no' 


O o 




o 


T— 1 




CM 


£ 




CO 






c^ 


60- 








60 




XOMOM 


ON LO 




NO 


to 


lo On CO 00 CO 


^r cm 




NO 


•— 

W 


rrj NO 


^r oo oo 


lo' ON 




in" 




i_0 lo to O NO 


CM lo 




CM 


CO 


co tN 


r-« CO On 


OK 




CO^ 


a3 


cm' 


CO* lo' <^ 1* 


co" 




co" 


^- 


60- 


T-H 


CM 




LO 


H 










60- 



In, 

CM 

co' 
CO 
XT 

tN,* 

NO 

T— I 

CO* 
60 



00 
00 
OO 

ON* 
CM 
60^ 



■* 
rr 

On 

LO* 

CO 
60- 



I o 

I ^ 

CO 

I 00 

I ^ 

j <^o 

60- 



Cn1co-^-lonOJn.C0On»— iCMco 



i— i t^. On » O i~ i NO 

»— I LO O0 r- 1 CO O 

O In! CM lo On lo 
CM CM LO OO in, O 

i-j o^ oq lo_ i-i cm 
o'inT cm'^'in.' 

In. On 00 CM 

r— c y— I 

60^ 

LO o o 

On NO O 

' cm'o 

IN. 00 

In. co 
60- 



ooc 

O'CO 

o'co 
o o 

ONC_ 

rCt-n* 

NO CO 

60- 




O 

o 
o 

<J 

> 



NO ON 

i—i o 
On NO 
t-h NO 
co'co' 

Ot-H 



O co O 

T-H O 

O CM 
"3- CM 

oo't-T 



On lo t-h \0 
CO t-h co On 
CM lo on lo* 
KOCNO 

T^-LO T-H CNJ 

CM"-*" In" 

00 CM 



lN»lO T-H T-H 

CO NO LO NO 
NO CM* l-O* f\l* 
KNCOO 
Olo1>. CM 

■^■"co* 



60- 



00N(NJOO»O 
CO OLO lo OO CO 

od in! no' cm' co' co 

t— i OK t— i on 

XN^oo^tN p^ro 

t—Tlo't— i o"co* 
NO On-* CM 

60- 



bo 

mh T3 

C/3 as 

. en ^h 

Ss -^ o 

S «J o 

cuww 



& 



-o 



s ^ 



3 g a 

I I 

»— CO IN. NO OTf 



ON 
ON 

o" 

XN. 

ON 

OO 
60^ 



LO 

LO 

CO 
LO 

cm" 

60^ 



CO 
CO 

CO 

o 

NO 
00* 

T-H 

60- 



NO 
LO 

00 

o 

CM 

T-H 

CO 
CO 
60 



tN 

CO 

ON 
LO 

CM 

ON* 
LO 

60- 



CM 

NO 



CM 
CM 

60^ 



CLASSIFICATION OF 

EXPENSES 
REVENUE 



DEPARTMENTAL 



58 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

MAYOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 6,093.26 



$ 6 ; 093.26 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Perry D. Thompson, 

Commissioner of Public Safety $ 3,000.00 

J. Joseph Hennessy, Secretary 2,056.34 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 305.09 

Printing, Binding, etc 3.50 

Telephone 56.93 

Transfers 63.00 

Transportation 33.30 

All Other Expenses 131.44 

■ $ 5,649.60 

Returned to Treasury 443.66 

$ 6,093.26 

OTHER COMMISSIONERS 

Appropriation $ 10,622.55 

$ 10,622.55 



Expended 

Salaries : 
To George H. Brown, Commissioner of Water 

Works and Fire Protection $ 2,500.00 

James E. Donnelly, Commissioner of 

Finance 2,500.00 

Charles J. Morse, Commissioner of Streets 

and Highways 2,500.00 

Francis A. Warnock, Commissioner of 

Public Property and Licenses 2,500.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising 47.21 

Office Supplies 68.30 

Printing, Binding, etc 339.86 

Telephone 9.48 

Transfers 18.00 

Transportation 72.90 

All Other Expenses 66.80 



$ 10,622.55 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 59 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 6,400.00 



$ 6,400.00 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Charles D. Paige, Auditor $ 2,500.00 

Clerks 2,750.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 391.90 

Printing, Binding, etc 666.60 

All Other Expenses 90.18 

6,398.68 

Returned to Treasury 1.32 



$ 6,400.00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 17,315.81 



$ 17,315.81 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 
To Fred H. Rourke, Treasurer and Collector $ 2,620.16 

Andrew G. Stiles, Treasurer and Collector 79.84 

Clerks 9,702.84 

Writing Tax Bills 230.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising •. 403.76 

Expenses on Bonds, etc 270.85 

Office Supplies 2,482.00 

Premiums on Bonds 700.00 

Printing, Binding, etc 371.58 

Telephone 29.84 

All Other Expenses 87.78 

16,978.65 

Returned to Treasury 337.16 

$ 17,315.81 



60 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 16,824.50 



$ 16,824.50 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Albert J. Blazon, Assessor $ 2,250.00 

Daniel E. Hogan, Assessor 2,250.00 

Jeremiah J. O'Sullivan, Assessor 2,250.00 

Permanent Clerks ^ 

Temporary Clerks V 8,574.50 

Assistant Assessors ) 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 56.41 

Printing, Binding, etc 1,296.19 

Telephone 7.13 

Transfers 22.50 

All Other Expenses 110.17 

16,816.90 

Returned to Treasury 7.60 

$ 16.824.50 



LICENSE COMMISSION 

Appropriation $ 4,700.00 

$ 4,700.00 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Thomas P. Boulger $ 750.00 

Charles H. Hanson 800.00 

George E. Putnam 750.00 

Clerical Service 2,064.04 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising 30.32 

Office Supplies 32.93 

Printing, Binding, etc 161.50 

All Other Expenses 40.95 

4,629.74 

Returned to Treasury 70.26 

$ 4,700.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 61 



LAW DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 5,027.21 



$ 5,027.21 



Expended 

Salaries : 

To William D. Regan $ 3,000.00 

Clerk 1,100.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Books and Binding 159.70 

Legal Expenses 153.66 

Office Supplies 399.36 

Telephone 43.54 

Transfers 22.50 

All Other Expenses 107.82 

4,986.58 

Returned to Treasury 40.63 

$ 5,027.21 



CITY CLERK'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 10,461.35 

$ 10,461.35 



Expended 

Salaries : 

To Stephen Flynn, City Clerk $ 2,550.00 

William P. McCarthy, Assistant Clerk 2,050.00 

Clerks 3,798.39 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising 7.10 

Birth Returns 1,020.19 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 873.73 

Telephone 13.55 

Transportation 63.00 

All Other Expenses 23.78 



10,399.74 

Returned to Treasury 61.61 

$ 10,461.35 



62 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 1,505.69 



Expended 

Salary : 

To Owen A. Monahan $ 1,400.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 67.88 

Telephone 12.31 

Transfers 21.00 

All Other Expenses 4.50 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 14,384.35 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Stephen Kearney, City Engineer $ 2,700.00 

All Other Service 11,439.70 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 77.12 

Telephone 14.70 

Transfers 53.50 

All Other Expenses 99.33 



505.69 



$ 1,505 ^9 



$ 14,384.35 



$ 14,384.35 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 03 



ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATION 

Appropriation $ 20,401.99 



$ 20,401.99 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Hugh C. McOsker 

J. Omer Allard .... 

Francis M. Qua .... 

Fred Harrison 



$ 800.00 

750.00 

>■ Registrars of Voters 184 S? 

562.50 

Precinct Officers 7,144.00 

Public Buildings Labor 2,762.82 

Police Service 50.00 

All Other Service 3,080.75 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising 414.58 

Printing, Binding, Office Supplies, etc 2,476.54 

Catering 187.85 

Lighting 13.67 

Lumber 424.32 

Teaming 881.25 

Telephone 59.82 

Transfers 27.42 

Other Supplies 145.55 

Work on Boxes 89.75 

All Other Expenses 346.65 



$ 20,401.99 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation .- $ 9,131.36 

$ 9,131.36 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Edward H. Foye, Purchasing Agent $. 2,353.97 

Maxime Lepine, Purchasing Agent 59.17 

Inspectors and Clerks 3,903.28 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising $ 25.38 

Automobile Supplies and Repairs 653.41 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 1,366.87 

Telephone 18.75 

Transportation 73.20 

All Other Expenses 93.75 

8,547.78 

Returned to Treasury 583.58 

$ 9,131.36 



64 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

CITY HALL DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 23,517.17 

$23 517.17 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Engineers and Firemen $ 4,676.19 

Matrons 3,802.25 

Janitors and Elevator Service 4,450.20 

All Other 28.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Decorations 250.00 

Fuel and Light 7,796.86 

Furniture and Furnishings 133.00 

Ice 272.82 

Janitors' Supplies 379.41 

Laundry 83.62 

Transfers 604.60 

Water 398.22 

All Other Expenses 642.00 

$ 23,517.17 

INSURANCE 

Appropriation $ 6,079.29 

$ 6,079.29 

Expended 

To Various Persons and Firms $ 6.079.29 

$ 6,079.29 



REGISTRAR OF LABOR 

Appropriation $ 535.00 

$ 535.00 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Patrick J. Reynolds, Registrar of Labor .... $ 500.00 
Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies 15.78 

Transfers 19.00 

$ 534.78 

Returned to Treasury 22 

$ 535.00 



REVENUE 



PROTECTION PERSONS 
AND PROPERTY 



66 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $215,156.39 



Expended 

Salaries and Labor : 

To Redmond Welch, Supt. Police $ 2,400.00 

All Other Salaries and Labor 198,750.84 

Other Expenses : 

For Anto Care and Supplies $ 2.308.^3 

Coal and Wood 1,513.97 

Equipment for Men 33.36 

Gas and Electricity 694.39 

Hay, Grain, etc 406.31 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies, etc 99.06 

Ice 109.50 

Janitors' Supplies 80.97 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 904.92 

Pensions .' 6,308.92 

Prisoners, Care, Transportation 60.12 

Shoeing 103.70 

Telephoiie 142.69 

Transfers 17.00 

Water 241.75 

All Other Supplies 517.37 

All Other Expenses 463.49 



$215,156.39 



$215,156.39 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 67 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $237,725.24 

$237,725.24 

Expended 

Salaries and Labor : 

To Edward F. Saunders, Chief Fire Dept $ 2,500.00 

All Other Salaries and Labor 192,943.00 

Other Expenses : 
Equipment and Repairs : 

For Equipment for Men 238.00 

Hose and Fittings 1,365.56 

All Other Expenses 3,503.42 

Horses and Care of Same: 

For Hay, Grain, Straw, etc 7,694.55 

Horses and Hire of Horses 1,750.00 

Shoeing 1,147.07 

Stable Supplies, Harnesses, etc 526.13 

All Other Expenses 235.20 

Main. Buildings and Grounds : 

For Coal and Wood 4,938.37 

Furniture and Furnishings 155.60 

Gas and Electricity 2,413.27 

Laundry 940.37 

All Other 425.14 

Other Expenses : 

For Automobile Repairs and Supplies 3,157.22 

Fire Alarm Boxes 2,395.74 

Insurance 830.66 

Office Supplies and Printing 206.10 

Pensions 7,549.10 

Telephone 333.98 

Transfers 11.00 

Various Other Supplies 1,098.36 

Water 608.65 

All Other Expenses 364.25 

237,230.74 

Returned to Treasury 494.50 

• 

$237,725.24 



68 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

RIFLE RANGE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 1,300.00 



$ 1,300.00 



Expended 

Salary : 

To Raymond Eastman, Keeper $ 912.50 

Other Expenses : 

For Fuel 22.30 

Targets and Pasters 25.11 

Telephone 46.83 

Transfers 100.00 

Various Supplies 155.70 

All Other Expenses 2772 

1,290.16 

Returned to Treasury 9.84 

$ 1,300.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



69 



INSPECTION BUILDINGS 

Appropriation $ 89,536.71 



$ 89,53671 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 
To Francis A. Connor, Supt. Public Buildings $ 2,000.00 

All Other Salaries and Labor 49,251.02 

Other Expenses : 

For Automobile Supplies and Repairs 1,386.24 

Electrical Supplies 304.21 

Fuel, Light and Power 895.43 

Hardware 2,384.64 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies, etc 453.05 

Hay, Grain, etc 1,096.27 

Lumber 5,453.19 

Mason Work and Supplies 2.313.93 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 341.94 

Paints, Oils, Glass, etc 4,507.40 

Pensions 2,182.20 

Pipe, Fittings, Pleating, Plumbing, etc 13,426.53 

Shoeing *.. 139.90 

Telephone 31.01 

Transfers 9.34 

Various Other Supplies 779.96 

Water 57.60 

All Other Supplies 1,701.35 

Returned to Treasury 



5,715.21 
821.50 



$ 89,536.71 



70 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

INSPECTION WIRES 

Appropriation $ 2,857.40 

$ 2,857.40 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To William H. Mahan, Inspector Wires $ 1,600.00 

All Other Service 1,036.30 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies, Printing, etc 135.05 

Transfers 8.00 

Transportation, Car Fares, etc 60.00 

All Other Expenses ' 18.05 

$ 2,857.40 



SEALER WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Appropriation $ 5,593.71 

$ 5,593.71 



Salaries : 

To Warren P. Riordan, City Sealer $ 1,500.00 

All Other Service 3,336.57 

Other Expenses : 

For Advertising 25.89 

Equipment 158.29 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 73.87 

Telephone 62.56 

Transfers 277.70 

Transportation, etc 50.17 

All Other Expenses 108.66 

$ 5,593.71 



Al'DITOR'S REPORT 71 



FORESTRY—MOTH EXTERMINATION 

Appropriation $ 7,607.98 



$ 7,607.98 



Expended 



Salaries and Wages : 

To John G. Gordon, Superintendent ) . „ „ 

aii n*u c ■■ ■ r $ 5,613.04 

All Other Service j v ' 

Other Expenses : 

For Arsenate of Lead 703.70 

Equipment, Hardware, Repairs, etc 98.31 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 32.57 

Transfers 413.93 

Transportation 194.10 

All* Other Expenses 446.62 

7,502.27 

Returned to Treasury 105.71 

$ 7,607.98 



FISH AND GAME WARDENS 

Appropriation $ 150.00 



Expended 

Salaries : 

To Harry Gonzales $ 100.00 

Elmer H. Houghton 50.00 



$ 150.00 



$ 150.00 



72 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

POUND KEEPER 

Appropriation $ 5.00 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Orville W. Peabody $ 1.42 

A. B. Humphrey 3.16 

Returned to Treasury 

CITY WEIGHER 

Appropriation $ 1,010.00 

Expended 

Salary : 

To George F. Noonan, City Weigher $ 1,000.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Printing 8.00 

Returned to Treasury 

.1 

WATERWAYS 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Life Saving Apparatus $ 145.67 

Transfers 141.32 

All Other Expenses 239.46 

Returned to Treasury 



$ 5.00 



4.58 
.42 

$ 5.00 



$ 1,010.00 



$ 1,008.00 
2.00 

$ 1,010.00 



$ 600.00 



526.45 

73.55 



$ 600.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 73 



POLICE WIRES 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Returned to Treasury $ 500.00 



FIRE— TRIPLE COMBINATION 

Balance from 1917 $ 6,000.00 

$ 6,000.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Triple Combination $ 6,000.00 

$ 6,000.00 

DISTRICT POLICE— SPECIAL 

Appropriation $ 13,000.00 

$ 13,000.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Labor : 

To Various Persons for Services $ 5.517.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Fire Escapes 2,641.00 

Lumber 712.04 

Mason Supplies and Work 308.45 

Transfers 2,146.46 

Various Other Supplies ; 1,617.05 

All Other Expenses 57.60 

12,999.60 

Returned to Treasury .40 

$ 13,000.00 



NEW BOILERS— CITY HALL 

Appropriation $ 15,310.00 

$ 15,310,00 

Expended 
Other Expenses : 

For Advertising $ 3.47 

Boiler Contract 8.000.00 

Brick Work Contract 3,072.00 

Piping Contract 4.007.31 

All Other Expenses 61.85 

15,144.83 

Returned to Treasury 165.17 

$ 15,310.00 



REVENUE 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



76 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



HEALTH OFFICE 

Appropriation $ 43,004.00 



$ 43,004.00 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 
To P. Brunelle ] 

T. F. Carroll I Board of Health $ 1,500.00 

J. E. Drury J 

All Other Service 15,157.55 

Other Expenses : 

For Bacteriologist (temporary services) 416.65 

Board and Treatment 9,549.64 

Dry Goods, Clothing, etc 15.48 

Drugs, Medicines, etc 473.84 

Groceries and Provisions 1,480.79 

Influenza Epidemic 5,140.11 

Medical Attendance , 741.75 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 740.08 

Telephone 103.65 

Transportation, Traveling Expenses 601.69 

Transfers 1,019.01 

All Other Expenses * 703.84 

Returned to Treasury ; 



$ 37,644.08 
5,359.92 



$ 43,004.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 77 

REFUSE AND GARBAGE 

Appropriation $ 95,173.56 

$ 95,173.56 



Expended 

Wages : 
To Labor $ 72,954.10 

Other Expenses : 

For Compensation (U. S. S.) 322.35 

Hardware, Blacksmiths' Supplies 528.44 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies, etc 585.87 

Hay, Grain, etc 15,738.82 

Hire Horse, Teaming, etc 3,384.50 

Laundry 400.75 

Lighting 173.06 

Transfers 200.00 

Water 179.74 

All Other Expenses 705.93 



$ 95,173.56 



SMOKE INSPECTION 

Appropriation $ 340.00 



$ 340.00 

Expended 

Salary : 
To Charles J. Riley $ 300.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies, Printing, etc 2.35 

Transportation 10.00 

All Other Expenses 3.56 

315.91 

Returned to Treasury 24.09 

$ 340.00 



78 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



INSPECTION SCHOOL CHILDREN 

Appropriation $ 800.00 

$ 800.00 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To Various Physicians $ 800.00 

$ 800.00 



INSPECTION ANIMALS 

Appropriation $ 510.00 

" $ 510.00 

Expended 

Salary : 

To Walter A. Sherman, Inspector of Animals $ 500.00 

500.00 

Returned to Treasury 10.00 

$ 510.00 



INSPECTION MILK AND VINEGAR 

Appropriation $ 3,526.41 



$ 3,526.41 



Salaries : 
To Melvin F. Master, Inspector of Milk and 

Vinegar $ 1,733.32 

Collector .' 1,059.09 

Other Expenses : 

For Chemical Equipment and Supplies 108.61 

Office Supplies and Printing 5.00 

Traveling Expenses 33.99 

All Other Expenses 68.67 

3,008.68 

Returned to Treasury 517.73 

$ 3,526.41 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 79 

* 

COMFORT STATION 

Appropriation $ 6,300.00 

$ 6.300.00 

Expended 

Wages : .... 

To Labor $ 5,020.00 

Other Expenses : 

For Fuel and Light 507.13 

Janitors' Supplies 221.30 

Water 471.64 

All Other : 78.06 

6,298.13 

Returned to Treasury 1.87 

$ 6,300.00 



SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation $ 16,000.00 

_ $ 16,000.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 14,713.46 

Other Expenses : 

For Equipment, Hardware, etc 705.43 

Fuel and Lighting 214.89 

Hay, Grain, etc 2.16 

Lighting 46.25 

Office Supplies. Printing, etc 81.00 

All Other Expenses 201.38 

15,964.57 

Returned to Treasury 35.43 



$ 16,000.00 



REVENUE 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



82 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

HIGHWAYS 

Appropriation $206,199.61 



$206,191.61 



Expended 

Salaries and Labor : 

To John B. Blessing-ton, Superintendent of 

Streets $ 2.300.00 

Clerical Service and Labor 168,594.84 

Other Expenses : 

For Autos, Care and Supplies 3,099.70 

Concrete, Tar, Oil and Asphalt 2,914.78 

Edgestone and Flagging 251.52 

Equipment, Hardware, etc 3,296.25 

Freight 1,510.73 

Fuel 432.15 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies, etc 244.41 

Hay, Grain, etc 15,943.54 

Horse Medicine, Veterinary 154.67 

Service 

Lighting 396.89 

Lumber 1,527.95 

Office Supplies and Printing 593.49 

Telephone 115.73 

Teaming, LTse of Horses and Autos 328.50 

Transfers 2,338.84 

Various Other Supplies 440.40 

Water 483.75 

All Other Expenses 943.80 

$205,911.94 

Returned to Treasury 287.67 

$206,199.61 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 83 

SPRINKLING STREETS 

Appropriation $ 23,553.51 

.. $ 23,553.51 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 2,053.51 

Other Expenses : 

For Hardware, Equipment, etc 49.42 

Oil and Applying Oil 10,595.39 

Transfers 1,824.20 

Use Track, Power and Street Sprinkler 6,109.70 

All Other Expenses 2,919.94 

$ 23,552.16 

Returned to Treasury 1.35 

$ 23,553.51 



STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation $120,000.00 

$120,000.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Electrical Lighting ." $ 88,202.96 

Gas Lighting 31.656.51 

All Other Expenses 20.00 

119,879.47 

Returned to Treasury 120.53 

$120,000.00 



REVENUE 



CHARITIES 



86 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

CHARITY DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $140,771.85 



Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Martin F. Conley. Superintendent $ 1,500.00 

All Other Service 26,298.54 

All Other Expenses : 
Outside Relief by City : 

For Burials 292.00 

Coal and Wood 1,201.10 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 1,404.79 

Outside Relief, City : 

State Institutions 773.54 

Other Institutions 8,978.50 

Relief, Other Cities, Towns : 

Cities 1,113.66 

Towns 435.48 

Other Expenses 1,596.84 

Chelmsford Street Hospital : 

For Drugs, Chemicals, etc 1,205.94 

Dry Goods, Clothing, etc 5,122.65 

Equipment, Hardware, etc 2,150.48 

Furniture, etc 80.40 

Groceries, Provisions, etc 43,694.00 

Hay, Grain, Straw, etc 8,731.03 

Power, Fuel and Light 21,004.09 

Other Expenses 3,718.29 

All Other Expenses : 

For Ambulance Service 3,900.00 

Cash Allowance 5,686.94 

Office Supplies and Printing 194.13 

Transfers 1,512.18 

Transportation 140.36 

All Other Expenses 36.91 



$140,771.85 



$140,771.85 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 87 



MOTHERS— DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation $ 46,313.16 

$ 46,313.16 

Expended 
Other Expenses : 

For Board and Medical Care $ 234.00 

Burials 100.00 

Mothers with Dependent Children 45,035.66 

All Other Expenses 943.50 

$ 46,313.16 



REVENUE 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 



90 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS— OFFICE 

Appropriation ; $ 2,541.94 

$ 2,541.94 

Expended 

Salaries : 

To George E. Worthen, Supt. State Aid $ 1,400.00 

Mary F. McCrann, Asst. Supt. State Aid .... 1,000.00 
Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies and Printing 45.80 

Transfers 28.00 

All Other Expenses 68.14 

$ 2,541.94 



STATE AID 

Appropriation $ 11,018.00 

$ 11,018.00 

Expended 

To Various Persons $ 11,000.00 

$ 11,000.00 

Returned to Treasury 18.00 

$ 11,018.00 

MILITARY AID 

Appropriation $ 1,810.00 

$ 1,810.00 

Expended 

To Various Persons $ 1,766.00 

1,776.00 

Returned to Treasury 44.00 

$ 1,810.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF 

Appropriation $ 14,643.87 

$ 14,643.87. 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Aid (Various Persons) $ 10,408.00 

Burials 300.00 

Fuel 284.93 

Groceries and Provisions 2,035.96 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 509.54 

Transfers 26.25 

All Other Expenses 179.19 

$ 14,643.87 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 91 

SOLDIERS' GRAVES 

Appropriation $ 250.00 

$ 250.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Setting Stones $ 148.35 

All Other Expenses 91.35 

239.70 

Returned to Treasury 10.30 

$ 250.00 



GERMAN WAR 

Appropriation $ 57,410.54 

$ 57,410.54 

Expended 

To Various Persons $ 57,410.54 

$ 57,410.54 



REVENUE 



EDUCATION 



94 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $563,207.73 

$563,207.73 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Hugh J. Molloy, Supt. of Schools $ 3,500.00 

All Other Salaries and Labor 404,251.64 

Transfers 23,025.49 

Other Expenses : 

For Automobile Supplies and Repairs 843.11 

Board of Truants, Training School 1,648.25 

Fuel and Light 43,705.25 

Furniture and Furnishings 904.79 

Hardware 2,527.22 

Laundry '. 875.68 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 443.54 

Paper, Pens, Pencils, etc 8,072.23 

Provisions 448.98 

Printing 1,941.15 

Rental Theatre 325.00 

Text and Reference Books 4,841.93 

Transportation 1,438.20 

Training School, State Agreement 23,025.49 

Telephone 742.00 

Transfers 8,751.04 

Typewriters 3,585.00 

Various Other Supplies 5,084.59 

Water 2,306.88 

All Other Expenses 10,097.40 ' 

552,384.86 

Returned to Treasury 10,822.87 

$563,207.73 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 95 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Appropriation $ 39,094.36 

$ 39,094.36 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Various Persons $ 28.477.55 

Other Expenses : 
For Electrical Supplies, Machinery, Tools, 

Hardware, etc 4,412.75 

Laundry 464.53 

Lumber 595.94 

Power, Fuel and Light 2,239.39 

Printing, Office Supplies, etc 128.21 

Supplies for Girls' Course 397.03 

Text and Reference Books 35.99 

Telephone 110.55 

Transfers 38.00 

All Other Supplies 671.97 

$ 37.571.91 

Returned to Treasury 1,522.45 



$ 39,094.36 



TEXTILE SCHOOL 

Appropriation $ 20,000.00 



Expended 

To Trustees Lowell Textile School $ 20,000.00 



$ 20,000.00 



$ 20,000.00 



REVENUE 



RECREATION 



$ 18,372.63 



98 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $ 18,372.63 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Various Persons $ 9,963.67 

Other Expenses : 

For Autos, Auto Supplies, Repairs, etc 2,001.48 

Hardware, Equipment, etc 1,137.50 

Hay, Grain, etc 733.89 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc 172.86 

Payments to Enlisted Soldiers 753.00 

Plants, Trees, etc 513.05 

Telephone 27.40 

Transfers 20.27 

Various Other Supplies 759.58 

Work on South Common Pool 81.50 

All Other Supplies 1,172.10 

$ 17,336.30 

Returned to Treasury 1,036.33 

$ 18,372.63 



SPECIAL— PARKS 

Appropriation $ 6,000.00 



$ 6,000.00 



Expended 

Wages : 

For Labor $ 2,794.35 

Other Expenses : 

For Concrete Work 1,448.50 

Hardware, Equipment, etc 48.79 

Lumber 1.21 

Moving Pictures 152.18 

Plants, Shrubs, etc 43.50 

Transfers 16.00 

All Other Expenses 895.94 

$ 5,400.47 

Returned to Treasury 599.53 

$ 6.000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 99 

FOURTH OF JULY 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

$ 600.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Chimes $ 10.00 

Music 590.00 

$ 600.00 



LABOR DAY 

Appropriation $ 1,200.00 

$ 1,200.00 

Expended 
Other Expenses : 

For Badges $ 29.72 

Music 931.26 

Prizes 223.00 

Teaming 5.40 

All Other 10.60 

$ 1,199.98 

Returned to Treasury .02 

$ 1,200.00 



BAND CONCERTS 

Appropriation $ 352.76 

$ 35276 

Expended 
Other Expenses : 

For Music $ 333.00 

Lighting 19.76 

$ 352.76 



100 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



MEMORIAL DAY— G. A. R. 

Appropriation $ 1 ; 000.00 

$ 1,000.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Flags and Standards $ * 335.86 

Flowers, Decorations, etc 71.00 

Music 242.00 

Transportation 96.00 

All Other Expenses 255.14 

$ 1,000.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— S. W. V. 

Appropriation $ 400.00 

$ 400.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Catering $ 150.00 

Flags 18.00 

Music 137.00 

Transportation 25.00 

All Other Expenses 70.00 

400.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— S. of V. 

Appropriation $ 150.00 

$ 150.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Various Expenses $ 150.00 

150.00 



VETERAN FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION 

Appropriation $ 100.00 

$ 100.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Flowers, Decorations, etc $ 52.50 

All Other Expenses 3.50 

56.00 

Returned to Treasury 44.00 

$ 100.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 101 

CARDINAL O'CONNELL PARKWAY 

Appropriation $ 650.00 

$ 650.00 

Expended 
Wages : 

To Labor $ 542.07 

Other Expenses : 

For Plants, Trees, etc 63.00 

All Other Expenses 43.66 

648.73 

Returned to Treasury 1.27 

$ 650.00 



REVENUE 



LIBRARIES 



104 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



LIBRARY 

Appropriation $ 22,620.67 

$ 22,620.67 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 

To Frederick A. Chase, City Librarian $ 2,200.00 

All Other Service 12,250.63 

Other Expenses : , 

For Binding Books and Periodicals 1,159.44 

Books 2,536.28 

Lighting 638.51 

Magazines and Newspapers 863.87 

Office Supplies and Printing 741.41 

Pictures 54.00 

Sub Libraries 304.05 

All Other Expenses 739.67 

21,487.86 

Returned to Treasury 1,132.81 

$ 22,620.67 



RESTORING PORTRAITS MEMORIAL HALL 

Balance from 1917 $ 6.83 

Returned to Treasury $ 6.83 



RECONSTRUCTION LIBRARY AND MEMORIAL HALL 

Balance from 1917 $ 452.19 

$ 452.19 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Transfers $ 376.52 

All Other Expenses 58.09 

434.61 

Returned to Treasury 17.58 

$ 452.19 



REVENUE 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 



106 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Balance from 1917 

Cash Receipts 

Transfers 



Expended 

Salaries and Labor : 

To Robert J. Thomas, Supt. Water Works 
All Other Salaries and Labor 

Other Expenses : 

For Auto Repairs and Supplies 

Damages ~ 

Equipment and Repairs , 

Fuel 

Freight 

Insurance 

Hay, Grain, Straw, etc , 

Lighting 

Lumber 

Meters and Fittings , 

Office Supplies and Printing , 

Oil, Waste, Packing, etc , 

Pipe and Fittings 

Transfers , 

Telephone 

Refunds 

Vacancy List 

Valves, Gates, Hydrants, etc 

Water Works Debt Payment , 

Water Works Interest , 

All Other Expenses 



*The Water Works debt and interest payment de- 
ferred by order of Municipal Council 



5 1,94175 

295,784.49 

5,108.80 



5 2,000.00 
134,791.74 

10,117.27 

60.00 

11,811.34 

57,148.38 

674.07 

2,504.27 

1,397.91 

708.58 

468.79 

3.746.16 

1,686.14 

2.216.55 

9,116.10 

447.09 

485.37 

206.61 

61.18 

1,301.92 

47,000.00 

56,025.00 

2,797.59 



$302,835.04 



346,772.06 

♦27,020.00 

$319,752.06 



WATER WORKS— SPECIAL 

Interest Receipt $ 5,352.32 



Balance to 1919 $ 5.352.32 



$ 5,352.32 
$ 5,352.32 



REVENUE 



CEMETERIES 



108 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



CEMETERIES 

Receipts $ 15,729.23 

Balance from 1917 : 2,319.24 



$ 18,048.47 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages : 
To Thomas Duckworth, Supt. Edson Cemetery $ 1,500.00 

Other Salaries and Labor 9,421.42 

Other Expenses : 

For Office Supplies and Printing 150.36 

Hay, Grain, Straw, etc 192.35 

Mare 300.00 

Perpetual Care Signs 425.24 

Plants, etc 355.79 

Transfers 16.50 

All Other Expenses 953.64 

$ 13,315.30 

Balance to 1919 4,733.17 

$ 18,048.47 



REVENUE 



DEBT, INTEREST, SINKING FUNDS 



110 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



INTEREST 

Appropriation $184,768.62 

$184,768.62 

Expended 

For Interest $184,768.62 

$184,768.62 



CITY DEBT 

Appropriation $412,621.30 

$412,621.30 

Expended 

To Various Financial Institutions and Individuals $412,621.30 

$412,621.30 



SINKING FUNDS 

Appropriation $ 30,500.00 

$ 30,500.00 

Expended 

To Commissioners Sinking Fund $ 30,500.00 

$ 30,500.00 



REVENUE 



TAXES 



112 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



STATE TAX 

Appropriation $211,860.00 

$211,860.00 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $211,860.00 

$211,860.00 



NATIONAL BANK TAX 

Appropriation $ 11,890.48 

$ 11,890.48 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 11,740.43 

11,740.43 

Returned to Treasury 150.05 

$ 11,890.48 



COUNTY TAX 

Appropriation .' $104,993.10 



$104,993.10 



Expended 

To County of Middlesex $104,993.10 

$104,993.10 



LIQUOR LICENSES 

Appropriation $ 36,400.00 



$ 36,400.00 



Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 36,209.00 

36,209.00 

Returned to Treasury 191.00 

■ ( 

$ 36,400.00 



AUDITOR'S RKTORT 113 



GRADE CROSSINGS 

Appropriation $ 4,480.00 



$ 4,480.00 



Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 4,480.00 

$ 4,480.00 



STATE HIGHWAY TAX 

Appropriation $ 2.631.31 

$ 2,631.31 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 2,631.31 

$ 2,631.31 



SOLDIERS' EXEMPTION 

Appropriation $ 33.08 

$ 33.08 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 33.08 

$ 33.08 



REVENUE 



UNCLASSIFIED 



116 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



CLAIMS 

Appropriation $ 14,167.31 

S 14,167.31 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Damages $ 256.41 

Injuries 3,779.70 

Registrar's Salary 1,750.00 

Services and 1917 Bills 2,810.94 

A. G. Stiles and E. H. Foye— Payments 3,876.01 

Street Watering and Tax Refunds 454.11 

Transfers 759.25 

All Other Expenses 213.72 

$ 13,900.14 

Balance to 1919 267.17 

$ 14,167.31 

REVISION OF ORDINANCES 

Balance from 1917 $ 495.50 

$ 495.50 

Balance to 1919 $ 495.50 

$ 495.50 

AUDITING CITY BOOKS 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

— $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 
For Auditing $ 995.00 

$ 995.00 

Returned to Treasury 5.00 

$ 1,000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



117 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT 

Appropriation $ 4,761.24 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

To Various Persons (Compensation) $ 3,804.11 

First Aid, Medical Treatment 463.07 

Injuries and Death Benefits 440.86 

All Other Expenses 53.20 



$ 4,761.24 



$ 4,761.24 



GENERAL EXPENSES 

Appropriation $ 5,352.31 

Expended 

For Other Expenses : 

Christmas Celebration $ 212.63 

City Documents 619.25 

Decorations 200.00 

Music 1,026.21 

Office Supplies, Printing, etc : 2,006.00 

Services 176.90 

Steel Die 150.00 

Transfers 39.00 

Transportation 121.50 

All Other Expenses 800.82 



$ 5,352.31 



$ 5,352.31 



EXECUTION OF COURT 

Appropriation $ 10,824.59 



Expended 

Other Expenses : 
For Execution of Court $ 10,824.59 



$ 10,824.59 



$ 10,824.59 



NON- REVENUE 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



120 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION 

Balance from 1917 $ 6,531.74 

Appropriation 67,000.00 

$ 73,531.74 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 54,849.08 

Other Expenses : 

For Brick and Cement 1,730.23 

Castings 3,339.53 

Fnel 843.03 

Lumber 1,092.20 

Pipe and Fittings 4,043.52 

Transfers 2,259.43 

All Other Expenses 1,134.65 

$ 69,291.67 

Balance to 1919 4,240.07 

$ 73,531.74 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL 

Cash Receipt $ .95 

Balance from 1917 ; 72,587.42 

$ 72,588.37 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Architect $ 2,900.00 

Contracts 68,174.23 

All Other Expenses 52.48 

71,126.71 
Balance to 1919 1,461.66 



$ 72,588.57 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL— EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS 

Balance from 1917 $ 24.000.00 

$ 24,000.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Kitchen Equipment $ 14,700.00 

Laundry Equipment 6,600.00 

21,300.00 

Balance to 1919 2,700.00 

$ 24,000.00 



NON- REVENUE 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



122 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PAVING 

Balance from 1917 $ 6,676.93 

Appropriation 50,000.00 

Receipts 1,772.60 

Transfers 1,444.44 



$ 59,893.97 



Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 38,312.60 

Other Expenses : 

For Brick and Cement 5,096.92 

Concrete 2,193.79 

Paving Blocks 3,983.88 

Teaming 3,899.80 

Crushed Stone 1,609.37 

Edgestone 1,140.94 

Sand and Loam 1,121.46 

Transfers 983.97 

All Other Expenses 1,470.88 

59,813.61 

Balance to 1919 80.36 

$ 59,893.97 



MACADAMIZING 

Balance from 1917 $ 928.53 

Appropriation 25,000.00 



$ 25,928.53 



Expended 
Wages : 

To Labor $ 15,892.49 

Other Expenses : 

For Concrete 200.99 

Equipment and Repairs 1,176.57 

Freight 342.75 

Oil, Tar and Tarite 3,430.85 

Stone 541.89 

Teaming 1,132.19 

Transfers 111.34 

All Other Expenses 2,975.45 

25,804.52 

Balance to 1919 124.01 

$ 25,928.53 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 123 

NEW SIDEWALKS 

Balance from 1917 $ 325.49 

Appropriation 5,164.44 

$ 5,489.93 

Expended 

Wages : 
To Labor $ 3,022.01 

Other Expenses : 

For Concrete 210.51 

Edgestone 1,566.64 

Granolithic Work 200.50 

Transfers 188.23 

All Other Expenses 21.00 

. 5,208.89 

Balance to 1919 281.04 

$ 5,489.93 



WEDGE AND PORTER STREETS 

Balance from 1917 $ .10 

$ .10 

Balance to 1919 $ .10 

$ .10 



PAWTUCKET FALLS BRIDGE 

Balance from 1917 , $ 2,500.00 

$ 2,500.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 
For Contract $ 2,500.00 

$ 2,500.00 



124 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



WIDENING SCHOOL AND MAMMOTH ROAD 

Balance from 1917 $ 3,06274 

$ 3,062.74 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Land and Buildings $ 2,336.80 

Transfers 43.25 

All Other Expenses 50.00 

2,430.05 

Balance to 1919 632.69 

$ 3,062.74 



SALE BUILDINGS— DUMMER STREET 

Balance from 1917 $ 152.30 

$ 152.30 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Services $ 50.00 

50.00 

Balance to 1919 102.30 

$ 152.30 



NON- REVENUE 



EDUCATION 



126 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

ACQUIRING LAND, CONSTRUCTING NEW HIGH SCHOOL 

Balance from 1917 $ 76,927.83 

$ 76,927.83 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 1,545.22 

Other Expenses : 

For Land 1,150.00 

Paint 270.00 

Steel 45,934.16 

Transfers 107.15 

All Other Expenses 7.90 

49,014.43 

Balance to 1919 27,913.40 



$ 76,927.83 



ACQUIRING LAND AND CONSTRUCTING SCHOOLS 

Balance from 1917 $105,365.38 

Receipts 380.00 

$105,745.38 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 780.46 

Other Expenses : 

For Architect 2.895.57 

Contracts 86,950.97 

Plumbing 190.90 

Transfers 18.28 

All Other Expenses 1,746.53 

92.582.71 

Balance to 1919 13,162.67 

$105,745.38 

SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS— STATE POLICE 

Balance from 1917 $ 179.68 

$ 179.68 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 179.38 

$ 179.38 

Balance to 1919 .30 

$ 179.68 



NON -REVENUE 



RECREATION 



128 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



CHAMBERS STREET PLAYGROUND 

Balance from 1917 $ 892.45 

$ 892.45 

Balance to 1919 $ 892.45 

$ 892.45 



LAND FOR PUBLIC PARKS 

Balance from 1917 $ 1,252.12 

$ 1,252.12 

Balance to 1919 $ 1,252.12 

$ 1,252.12 



PARK PURPOSES 

Balance from 1917 $ 2,371.74 

$ 2,371.74 

Balance to 1919 $ 2,371.74 

$ 2,371.74 



FAIRGROUNDS— PARKS 

Balance from 1917 $ 19,878.84 

Transfer 190.00 

$ 20,068.84 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Land $ 20,006.00 

All Other Expenses 6.50 

20,012.50 

Balance to 1919 56.34 

$ 20,068.84 



NON- REVENUE 



WATER WORKS 



130 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PURIFYING AND CONSTRUCTING WATER SYSTEM 

Balance from 1917 $ 2,308.80 

$ 2,308.80 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Transfer $ 2,308.80 

$ 2,308.80 



WATER WORKS— PURCHASE LAND 

Balance from 1917 $ 100.00 

$ 100.00 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Land $ 100.00 

$ 100.00 



ADDITIONS TO PLANT NO. 2 

Transfer $ 4,770.51 

$ 4,770.51 

Expended 

Other Expenses : 

For Smoke Stack $ 985.00 

$ 985.00 

Balance to 1919 3,785.51 

$ 4,770.51 



NON-REVENUE 



UNCLASSIFIED 



132 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



MUNICIPAL PURPOSES 

Balance from 1917 $ 205.96 

$ 205.96 

Expended 
Other Expenses : 

For Recording $ 3.35 

$ 3.35 

Balance to 1919 202.61 

$ 205.96 



FUNDS 

SINKING 

HAPGOOD WRIGHT 

JOHN DAVIS 

CEMETERY 



134 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



SINKING FUNDS 

Water Works due November 1, 1920. 

Value January 1, 1918 $860,752.52 

Value December 31, 1918 910,394.56 

Increase during year $ 49,642.04 

City Hall and Memorial Building due October, 1920. 

Value January 1, 1918 $391,634.24 

Value December 31, 1918 415,644.03 

Increase during year $ 24,009.79 

High School due April, 1921. 

Value January 1, 1918 $132,846.32 

Value December 31, 1918 141,475.57 

■ ■ — » 

Increase during year $ 8,629.25 

New School Houses due July, 1926. 

Value January 1, 1918 $121,452.42 

Value December 31, 1918 130,141.15 

Increase during year $ 8,688.73 



Cemetery Fund 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

On hand January 1, 1918 $105,767.00 

On hand December 31, 1918 114,990.00 

Increase during year $ 9,225.00 

Deposited in banks $114,990.00 

Interest due on same 24.437.96 

Total amount of fund $139,427.96 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 135 

Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust Fund 

Resolution adopted by the City Council, March 14, 1876: "The sum of 
$1,000.00 be accepted from Hapgood Wright, under the conditions 
specified by him, that the money be placed at interest for 50 years, and 
at the end of that time the interest to be spent by the City Council (by 
a two-third vote) for the benefit of the City or its citizens, but the 
original $1,000.00 to be always kept on deposit and the interest only to 
be spent by the City Council at the end of each 50 years." 

Cash Total 

On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $5,443.90 $5,443.90 

Received during 1918 

CASH— Interest on bank deposits 247.68 $5,691.58 

On hand Jan. 1, 1919 $5,691.58 

Increase during the year $ 247.68 

Securities Belonging to this Fund 

Cash in Lowell Institution for Savings $1,141.53 

Cash in City Institution for Savings 4,550.05 

$5,691.58 

SINKING FUNDS CLASSIFIED 

Full value of all Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1919 $1,597,655.31 

Full value of all Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1918 1,506,685.50 

Increase during year $90,969.81 



Value of Water Loan Sinking Fund Jan. 1, 1919 $910,394.56 
Value of Water Loan Sinking Fund Jan. 1, 1918 860,752.52 



Increase during the year $49,642.04 

Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1,1919 $687,260.75 

Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1918 645,932.98 

Increase during the year $41,327.77 

Total increase as above $90,969.81 

Value of the Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust Fund, Jan. 

1, 1919 $5,691.58 

Value of the Hapgood Wrjiight Centennial Trust Fund, Jan. 

1, 1918 '. 5,443.90 

Increase during the year $ 247.68 



136 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



WATER LOAN SINKING FUND 

Securities C^ush Totnl 

On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $829,621.30 $31,131.22 $860,752.52 

Received during 1918 : 

Cash — Annual Appropriation 16.000.00 

Income on Investment 34,178.47 

Income on Bank Deposits .... 236.01 

Securities Sold or Matured 27,171.30 

SECURITIES— Bought during 1918 .. 106,000.00 



Paid during 1918 : 
SECURITIES— Matured and Paid 
CASH— For Securities Purchased 



$935,621.30 $108,717.00 

27,171.30 

106,772.44 



On hand Dec. 31, 1918 $908,450.00 1,944.56 $910,394.56 

Increase during 1918 $ 49,642.04 



Securities Belonging to This Fund 



Coupon Bonds 

26 American Tel. & Tel. Co 

10 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 

10 Boston & Lowell Railroad 

8 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 

4 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 

4 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 

10 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 

5 City of Bath 

5 City of Bridgeport 

15 City of Chicago 

5 City of Duluth 

5 City of Milwaukee 

3 City of Minneapolis 

18 City of Minneapolis 

4 City of Newton 

1 City of Waltham 

14 City of Waterville 

5 City of Wilkesbarre 

5 City of Milwaukee 

20 Illinois Central Railroad 

6 Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western Railroad 

9 New York, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 



4% 

zy 2 

4 

5 

6 

6 

4 

41/ 

4 

4 

4 

4 

m 

3J4 

4 
4 

4V 2 

w 

6 
6 



$26,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 
8,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 

10,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

15,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 

18,000.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 

14,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

20,000.00 
6,000.00 
9,000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



137 



Water Loan Sinking' Fund — Continued 

60 New York. New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4', $60,000.00 

12 Town of Athol 4 12,000.00 

4 Town of Canton, Mass 4 4,000.00 

4 Boston & Maine Railroad 4 4,000.00 

5 City of Hamilton 5 2,500.00 

2 City of South Omaha 6 1,000.00 

10 Penobscot Shore Line Railroad 4 10,000.00 

5 State of Minnesota A l / 2 5,000.00 

5 State of Minnesota ¥/ 2 5,000.00 

6 State of Minnesota ¥/ 2 6,000.00 

1 Town of Milton 3}A 1,000.00 

5 Town of Milton 3 l / 2 5,000.00 

15 Boston & Maine Railroad 4 15,000.00 

5 City of Akron 5 5,000.00 

5 City of Canton 5 5,000.00 

2 City of Canton 5 2,000.00 

3 City of Canton 5 3.000.00 

3 City of Canton 5 3.000.00 

2 City of Canton S J / 2 2,000.00 

5 City of Dayton 5 5,000.00 

3 City of Lawrence 4 3,000.00 

4 City of Lorain : 5 4,000.00 

3 City of South Omaha 6 1,250.00 

1 City of South Omaha 6 300.00 

5 Louisville & Nashville Railroad 6 5,000.00 

2 St. Tohnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad .... 5 2,000.00 
2 Boston & Lowell Railroad 4 2,000.00 

1 City of Dayton A l / 2 1,000.00 

2 City of Flint, Mich .* 4}/ 2 2,000.00 

10 City of Haverhill 4 10,000.00 

City of Lakewood, Ohio AV 2 1,000.00 

City of Lakewood, Ohio $y 2 1,000.00 

City of Lakewood, Ohio 5 388.00 

City of Lakewood, Ohio 5 230.00 

City of Lakewood, Ohio 5 352.00 

City of Lima, Ohio 5 1,000.00 

City of Lima, Ohio 5 1,000.00 

City of Lima, Ohio , 5 1,000.00 

City of Lowell 4 41,000.00 

City of Lowell 4 1,000.00 

City of Quincy 3.65 1,000.00 

5 City of Saginaw 4 5.000.00 

3 City of Youngstown, Ohio 5 3.000.00 



138 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Water Loan Sinking Fund — Continued 

12 City of Youngstown, Ohio $% 

5 City of Youngstown, Ohio 5 

10 Fitchburg Railroad 3]/ 2 

5 Rome Watertown & Ogdensburg Railroad .... 5 

36 Town of Northneld 3}A 

1 Liberty Loan 4 T 4 

35 Boston Elevated Railroad 4 

12 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 

1 City of Cleveland 4}/ 2 

4 City of Lowell 4 

2 City of East Portland, Ore 6 

1 City of Saginaw 4 

5 City of San Francisco 5 

15 Delaware & Hudson Railroad 4 

40 Kennebec Water District 3 l / 2 

5 New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 

1 Town of Attleborough 3 l A 

4 Town of Reading 3 l/ ? 

20 Worcester Consolidated Railroad 5 

5 Liberty Loan 4% 

10 Boston Elevated Railroad 5 

1 City of Chicopee .' 3]/ 2 

10 City of Cleveland ¥/> 

2 City of Cleveland A l / 2 

20 City of Cleveland 5 

5 City cf Minneapolis 4 

36 Concord & Montreal Railroad 4 

18 Lyni £ Boston Street Ry 5 

Registered Bonds 

1 Boston & Maine Railroad ¥/ 2 

3 City of Boston 3]/ 2 

1 City of Boston 3-/ 2 

1 City of Boston 3% 

1 City of Portland, Me 3*4 

1 City of Rochester 3 l / 2 

1 Chicago & No. Western Railroad 4 

2 Penobscot Shore Line Railroad 4 

1 City of Buffalo 3/ 2 

1 City of Boston 4 

10 City of Los Angeles 3^4 

1 State of Massachusetts 3]/ 2 



$ 5,930.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

18,000.00 

10,000.00 

35,000.00 

12,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

15,000.00 

40,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

4.000.00 

20,000.00 

50,000.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

2,000.00 

20,000.00 

5.000.00 

36,000.00 

18,000.00 



10,000.00 

15,000.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,500.00 

10.000.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

20,000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



139 



Water Loan Sinking' Fund — Continued 

1 City of Cleveland 5% 

4 Town of Lexington 4 

1 City of New Bedford 3 x / 2 

1 City of New Bedford 3V 2 



Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 



$10,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 
7,000.00 

$908,450.00 
1,944.56 

$910,394.56 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSES SINKING FUND 

Securities Cash 

On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $116,000.00 $ 5,452.42 

Received during 1918 : 

CASH— Annual Appropriation 4,000.00 

Income on Investments 4,806.25 

Income on Bank Deposits 55.06 

Securities Sold or Matured 5,000.00 

SECURITIES— Bought during 1918 .. 19.000.00 



$135,000.00 $19,313.73 



Paid during 1918: 

SECURITIES— Matured and Paid 
CASH — For Securities purchased 



5,000.00 



19,172.58 



Total 

$121,452.42 



On hand Dec. 31, 1918 $130,000.00 $ 141.15 $130,141.15 

Increase during year 1918 



Securities Belonging to This Fund 



Coupon Bonds 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad . 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 

City of Chicago 

City of Chicago 

City of Duluth 

City of Ft. Wayne 

City of Indianapolis 

City of Milwaukee 

City of Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Union Railroad 

New York, Lack. & Western Railroad 



4% 

4 

5 

4 

4 

4 

3y 2 

4 

4y 2 

4 
6 
6 



$ 8,688.73 



3,000.00 
4,000.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
7,000.00 
8,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 



140 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



New School Houses Sinking' Fund — Continued 

4 Boston & Maine Railroad 4% $ 4,000.00 

5 City of Akron 5 T / A 5,000.00 

7 City of Lawrence 4 7,000.00 

2 City of Lorain 5 2,000.00 

1 City of Beverly 4V 2 1.000.00 

3 City of Decatur, 111 4 3,000.00 

1 City of Lowell 4 1.000.00 

3 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 3,000.00 

1 City of Everett 4 1,000.00 

1 City of Everett 4 1,000.00 

14 City of Lowell 4 14,000.00 

5 New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 5,000.00 

5 Boston Elevated Railroad 5 5,000.00 

2 City of Minneapolis 4 2,000.00 

3 County of Hillsborough, N. H 4 3,000.00 

1 County of Middlesex 4 1,000.00 

8 Concord & Montreal Railroad 4 8,000.00 

1 Town of Winchester 4 1,000.00 

Registered Bonds 

1 City of Minneapolis 3^ 10,000.00 

1 Chicago & No. Western Railroad 4 5,000.00 

5 City of Albany A]/ 2 5,000.00 

$130,000.00 

Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 141.15 



$130,141.15 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



141 



LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL SINKING FUND 

Securities Cash 

On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $129,000.00 $ 3,846.32 

Received during 1918 : 

CASH — Annual Appropriation 3,000.00 

Income on Investments 5,593.75 

Income on Bank Deposits .. 27.81 

Securities Sold or Matured 7,000.00 

SECURITIES— Bought during 1918 .. 18,500.00 



Total 

$132,846.32 



Paid during 1918: 

SECURITIES— Matured and Paid .... 

CASH — For Securities purchased 



$147,500.00 $19,467.88 

7,000.00 

18.492.31 



On hand Dec. 31, 1918 $140,500.00 $ 975.57 141,475.57 

Increase during year 1918 $ 8,629.25 



Securities Belonging to This Fund 
Coupon Bonds 

3 American Tel. & Tel. Co 4% 

5 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 

5 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 6 

3 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 5 

8 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 5 

3 City of Fort Wayne 3*4 

5 City of Indianapolis 4 

5 City of Milwaukee '. AV 2 

5 City of Milwaukee A]/ 2 

3 City of Seattle 5 

3 Xew York, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 6 
12 Xew York, Xew Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 

1 Boston & Maine Railroad 4 

5 City of Akron 5% 

1 City of Salem 3'/* 

1 City of Salem 3V 2 

1 City of Dayton 5 

11 City of Lowell 4 

4 City of Dayton 4]4 

2 City of Saginaw 4 

5 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 

27 City of Lowell 4 



; 3,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
3.000.00 
8,000.00 
3,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

1,500.00 
3,000.00 

12,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 

11,000.00 
4,000.00 
2,000.00 
5,000.00 

27,000.00 



142 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Lowell High School Sinking Fund — Continued 

1 City of St. Paul 4% $ 1,000.00 

10 New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 10,000.00 

1 Town of Attleborough 3 T /< 1,000.00 

2 City of Dayton 5 2,000.00 

3 City of Haverhill 4 3,000.00 

Registered Bonds 

1 City of Buffalo 2>V 2 1,000.00 

1 Chicago & No. Western Railroad 4 5,000.00 

1 City of New Bedford 3V 2 1,000.00 

$140,500.00 

Cash on deposit in Appleton Bank 975.57 

$141,475.57 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 143 

CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL BUILDING SINKING FUND 

Securities 

On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $381,900.00 

Received during 1918: 

CASH — Annual Appropriation 

Income on Investments 

Income on Bank Deposits .. 
Securities Sold or Matured 
SECURITIES— Bought during 1^18 .. 34,000.00 



Cash 


Total 


$ 9,734.24 


$391,634.24 


7,500.00 




16.420.75 




63.08 




5,200.00 





$415,900.00 $38,918.07 
Paid during 1918: 
SECURITIES-Matured and Paid 5,200.00 

CASH — For Securities purchased .. 33,974.04 



On hand Dec. 31, 1918 $410,700.00 $ 4.944.03 $415,644.03 

Increase during year 1918 $ 24,009.79 



Securities Belonging to This Fund 

Coupon Bonds 

8 American Tel. & Tel. Co 4% $ 8,000.00 

8 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 8,000.00 

3 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 6 3,000.00 

4 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 5 4.000.00 

25 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 5 25,000.00 

2 City of Chicago 4 2,000.00 

3 City of Chicago 4 3,000.00 

1 City of Danbury .' 4 1,000.00 

1 City of Everett 4 1,000.00 

5 City of Fort Wayne 2> l / 2 5,000.00 

7 City of Indianapolis 4 7,000.00 

1 City of Middletown, Conn V-A 1,000.00 

5 City of Milwaukee 4} x 2 5,000.00 

2 City of Minneapolis 4V 4 2.000.00 

10 City of Meriden 4V 4 10,000.0?) 

10 City of Waterbury 4 5,000.00 

5 Illinois Central Railroad 3*4 5,000.00 

3 Minneapolis Union Railroad 6 3,000.00 

7 New York, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 6 7,000.00 

3 New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 3,000.00 

1 Town of Peabody 4 1,000.00 

6 Town of Warwick. R. 1 4V 2 6.000.00 

10 City of Augusta (Water Dist.) 4 10,000.00 



144 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

City Hall and Memorial Building Sinking Fund — Continued 

2 City of Hamilton 5% $ 1,000.00 

1 City of Toledo ¥/ 2 1,000.00 

5 Town of Methuen 4 2,500.00 

10 Boston & Maine Railroad 4 10,000.00 

3 City of Canton, Ohio 5 3,000.00 

2 City of Detroit 4 2,000.00 

1 City of Lorain 5 1,000.00 

3 City of Trenton 4 l / 2 3,000.00 

9 Louisville & Nashville Railroad 6 9,000.00 

1 City of Lowell 4 1,000.00 

1 City of Lowell , 4 1,000.00 

5 City of Minneapolis 4 5,000.00 

2 City of Newton 4 2,000.00 

2 City of Quincy 4 2,000.00 

3 City of Saginaw 4 3,000.00 

9 Town of Arlington 4 9,000.00 

10 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 4 10,000.00 

4 City of Akron 5 4,000.00 

10 City of East Portland, Ore 6 10,000.00 

64 City of Lowell 4 64,000.00 

6 City of Maiden 4 6,000.00 

5 City of St. Paul 4 5,000.00 

5 City of San Francisco 5 * 5,000.00 

10 Delaware & Hudson Railroad 4 10,000.00 

10 Fitchburg Railroad 4 10,000.00 

5 New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 4 5,000.00 

2 Town of Attleborough 3 l / 2 2,000.00 

5 Worcester Consolidated Railroad 5 5,000.00 

5 City of Brockton 4 5,000.00 

3 City of Chicopee 3]/ 2 3,000.00 

2 City of Hamilton ¥/ 2 1,000.00 

15 City of Minneapolis 4 15,000.00 

1 Concord & Montreal Railroad 4 1,000.00 

10 Lynn & Boston St. Ry 5 10,000.00 

3 Town of Stoughton 4 3.000.00 

5 Town of Stoughton 4 5,000.00 

Registered Bonds 

1 City of Boston 3V 2 5,000.00 

1 City of Boston V/ 2 6,000.00 

1 City of Providence 4 10,000.00 

1 City of Providence 4 1,000.00 

1 Town of Brookline 3}/ 2 3,000.00 

1 Chicago & No. Western Railroad 4 10,000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 145 



City Hall and Memorial Building Sinking- Fund — Continued 

1 Commonwealth of Massachusetts 3y 2 % $ 5,000.00 

1 City of Brockton 4 1,000.00 

1 City of Buffalo 4 l / 2 10,000.00 

1 City of Lowell, Serial Note 4}i 200.00 

$410,700.00 

Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 4,944.03 

$415,644.03 



Bonds Bought Since January 1, 1919 

1 City of Boston, Reg. 4 Oct. 1920 $ 3,000.00 

1 City of New Bedford, Reg. 4 Mar. 1921 5,000.00 

1 City of New Bedford, Reg. 4 Mar. 1921 7,000.00 

Water Loan 

2 City of Beverly, Coup. 4, May 1920 $ 2,000.00 

5 Bay City, Mich., Coup. 5, Sept. 1920 5,000.00 



146 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



JOHN DAVIS LIBRARY FUND 

Cash Securities 

On hand at beginning of year .. $486.02 $100,544.15 

On hand at end of year 199.45 100,527.98 



Decrease in Funds $286.57 



$ 



16.17 



Total 

$101,030.17 
100.727.43 

$ 302.74 



Receipts 

Mortgage payment $ 25.00 

Income on securities 3,035.00 

Interest on deposits 11.07 

National Bank Tax 82.71 



Total receipts $3,153.78 

Cash Jan. 1, 1918 486.02 



$3,639.80 



Payments 
To Library Trustees $3,440.35 



Total payments $3,440.35 

Cash Dec. 31, 1918 199.45 



$3,639.80 



The Securities 

Registered Bonds $ 84,000.00 



Railroad Stocks 

Industrial Stocks 

Bank Stocks 

Mortgage Notes 

Central Savings Bank Book No. 35073 
Cash in Appleton National Bank 



8,200.00 
2,100.00 
3,500.00 
2,525.00 
202.98 
199.45 



Total cash and securities $100,727.43 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 147 

ACCOUNT OF THE CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
OF TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1918 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1, 1919. 

To the Municipal Council : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 

Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Lowell for the financial year 

1918: 

Monthly Receipts As Follows: 

January ,.... $ 126,097.76 

February 461,593.12 

March 115,442.82 

April 783,591.16 

May 80,595.67 

June 503,523.76 

July 126,410.34 

August 676,882.43 

September 72,047.03 

October 1,741,163.94 

November 548,251.97 

December 330,718.84 

$5,566,318.84 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1918 389,792.57 



$5,956,111.41 



Monthly Payments As Follows: 

January $333,899.50 

February 285,453.41 

March 267,361.85 

April .; 638,440.13 

May 329,775.17 

June 269,545.05 

July 336,466.39 

August 483.588.42 

September 224,152.65 

October 951,329.80 

November 845,022.56 

December 750,702.37 



$5,715,737.30 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1918 240,374.11 



$5,956,111.41 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRED H. ROURKE, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



148 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



STATEMENT OF THE CITY TREASURER RELATING TO SPECIAL 
FUNDS FOR CARE OF PUBLIC BURIAL GROUNDS 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1, 1919. 
To the Municipal Council : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the following statement of 
Special Funds in my hands, deposited for perpetual care of Lots in the 
Public Burial Grounds of the City of Lowell. 
On hand Jan. 1, 1918 $105,765.00 

Received during the year from : 

Charles A. Wotton $100.00 

William D. Moffatt 200.00 

James R. Trevors 100.00 

Anna G. Norris 100.00 

John N. Palm 100.00 

Percy W. Senter 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth (Kate E. Battles) 25.00 

Angelos Cowlis 50.00 

David D. Coates 100.00 

Benjamin A. Smith 100.00 

Mrs. Ida A. Railey, Ex's 100.00 

Addie H. Jones Roberts 100.00 

Henry Boynton 100.00 

Hanna Wickstrom 100.00 

Geo. R. Martin 100.00 

Mary A. Wilson 100.00 

Ralph Frost, Jr 100.00 

Jessie C. White, Admx 100.00 

William A. Arnold 100.00 

Addie F. Prescott 50.00 

Elmer L. Bowen, Admr 100.00 

Albert S. Taylor, Executor 100.00 

Edward E. Farris, Exr 100.00 

Martin C. Lurvey 100.00 

Mary H. Carr 100.00 

Mrs. Mary Carlson 50.00 

Caroline L. Ward 100.00 

Frank J. Pike 100.00 

Lucy N. Teel 100.00 

Mrs. M. F. Deans 100.00 

J. F. O'Donnell & Sons (Sarah E. Tolman) 25.00 

M. H. McDonough & Sons (James Bean) 25.00 

Rev. N. W. Matthews 100.00 

Franklin E. Johnson, Exr 50.00 

William M. Thompson 100.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



149 



Katherine M. Lawrence 100.00 

O. A. Berntson * 100.00 

Isabel F. Caddell 100.00 

Eliza A. Ashton 100.00 

Volney Sprague 100.00 

Mary F. Saxe 100.00 

Georgiana A. Keen 100.00 

Miss Mary E. Pead 100.00 

Lena Foster, Admx 100.00 

Mrs. Fanny Mann 100.00 

Eliza L. Maynard 50.00 

Robert Johnson 100.00 

David E. Cornock 100.00 

Ellen Carmon 100.00 

Dura S. Stevens 100.00 

William H. Wilson 100.00 

Thomas Sutherland, Admr 100.00 

Miss C. E. Cushman 50.00 

John Haslam 200.00 

William A. Dolan 25.00 

Bella Meara 50.00 

John Anderson 50.00 

Qua, Howard & Rogers (M. W. Costello) 200.00 

Cora B. Tufts 100.00 

Achsah A. Eaton 100.00 

Andrew Adams 100.00 

Annie E. Hill 100.00 

Martha Blakeley 100.00 

Ellison Hill 100.00 

Esther H. Miller ". 100.00 

Miss Augusta V. Eaton 100.00 

William A. Cornock 100.00 

Mary E. Morris 100.00 

Theodore von Rosenvinge 25.00 

Ralph T. Leith 100.00 

T. K. Hall 100.00 

Marion Rosander 50.00 

Mrs. Annie Spear 50.00 

William X. Rushworth 100.00 

R. P. Huntoon 100.00 

Sarah Lilian Hoyle 100.00 

George W. Enwright 100.00 

Carlos E. Bohonan 100.00 

William Z. Hibbert 100.00 

George W. Healey (Louis Angevine) 25.00 

Frank C. Douglass 100.00 



150 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Thomas Duckworth (Manl Tizaian) ... 
Thomas Duckworth (Thomas Carter) 

Annie M. Stone 

Mrs. Margaret J. Fitzgerald 

Lora N. Emerson, Admr 

Mrs. Emily B. Pinkham 

Feme E. Richardson 

Georgianna Mitchell 

John N. Short 

Adelaide W. Clark 

Mary T. Gordon 

Mrs. Joseph Weimann 

Loring V. Estes 

Samuel Patenaude 

William Ashworth 

Annie Lamberton 

Charles H. Hanson 

John A. Anderson 

Clara M. Day, Admx 



25.00 

25.00 
100.00 

25.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
$ 9,225.00 



$114 990.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 151 

The amounts are invested as follows : 

Lowell Five Cents Savings Bank $ 14,075.00 

The Central Savings Bank 14,400.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 15,350.00 

Mechanics Savings Bank 14,100.00 

City Institution for Savings 12,700.00 

Lowell Institution for Savings 14,325.00 

Washington Savings Institution 13,600.00 

Middlesex Safe Deposit & Trust Co 16,440.00 



$114,990.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRED H. ROURKE, 

City Treasurer. 



General Information 



City Auditor's Report of Funds Held and 

Used by City 



PROPERTY OWNED BY CITY 

TABLES 

LOANS 

NEW HIGH SCHOOL 

PAWTUCKET BRIDGE 

CARDINAL O'CONNELL PARKWAY 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL 



154 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



TOTAL VALUATION AND CITY DEBT, 1918 



Real Estate and Personal Property Owned by the City 

Personal Real Total 

Public Safety $ 82,500.00 $ 364,200.00 $ 446,700.00 

Finance 8,600.00 8,600.00 

Public Property 39,300.00 1,648,675.00 1,687,975.00 

Streets and Highways 117,000.00 45,000.00 162,000.00 

Water and Fire 1,676,924.00 874,500.00 2,551,424.00 

Schools 54,300.00 2,504,204.00 2,558,500.00 

Cemetery 10,000.00 43,000.00 53,000.00 

Park 10,000.00 743,475.00 753,475.00 

Unclassified 10,525.00 10,525.00 

Total Valuation $8,232,199.00 

Gross City Debt 4,744,496.30 

Excess in Valuation of all City Property over the Gross 

Debt of City $3,487,702.70 



o o o o o o 

p o o p O O 

o o o o o o 

O O O O O O 

cc p 10 O^ CM o 

LO~ «J~T TJ-" 

T— ( CO 



w 

<q 



o - « 

5 J> rt o 



-o o 



rt 






^ m u 



V 


o 
o 


— 
© 


— 
o 


Q 
O 


p 


o o o 

o o o 


73 

> 


© 
o 


©' 

- 


© 

- 


© 

»— 1 




©'©'©' 
o o o 
°H, °. °. 


"3 




od 

ON 

6e- 


Csj 


<o~ 


<o~ 


00 


vo" t^T od 

•— ' CO Tf 

cm i—i 
y> &- m- 



o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

©' © © © © o 

o © o o o o 

CO CO *0 i-H ^ »-H 

c\f C\f fO CO od o" 







o 


3 




u 








03 


c« 




>o 






rt 


CO 






o 


CC 




y 


l^N. 






CO 


c 




< 


LO' 


© 


o 


© 


od 


M 




**■ 


CO 


o 


»— 1 


CM 






LO 


<0^ 






<J 






ON 


M0 






H 






CO 


t^ 






t—t 






1—1 


1—1 






(M 














Xfl 














© 














W 














PH 














H 


0) 


o 










l-H 


> 

U 

s 


© 

© 

o 

r^ 

^3- 











o 
o 

o 
o 

1— < 
vo" 



X. 

O 

E 

u 

O 



X) 

l-H 

o 



C/) C/3 CO <-> 

•a x! -o ^ 

tn 1_ U O 

o o o ^ 

4-1 «+■< «-M — i 

m <j~> '.n > 

r+ «-■ r* "Z 

B s M ° 

D H) D P 

^ G .H 

~£> C £ G 



■4— > 

o 



c 5 

a, o 

c '5b 

a as 



U 



rt rt rt rt C O 

J J J J W U 



156 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



FINANCE 

Auditor — Office $ 500.00 

Assessors " 500.00 

Treasurer " 500.00 

City Clerk " 500.00 

Elections " 5,000.00 

Registrars " 100.00 

Supply " 500.00 



STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

Streets $68,000.00 

Sprinkling Streets 12,500.00 

Sewers 21,000.00 

Lighting Streets 10,000.00 

Engineer 5,500.00 

City Stable 40,000.00 

Sprinkler Sheds 5,000.00 



MISCELLANEOUS REAL ESTATE 

Area Valuation 

Tenth Street 40,260 sq.ft. $ 800.00 

Tenth Street 175,985 " . 3,500.00 

Harris Land 28 acres 600.00 

Parker Land 20 " 1,400.00 

Hildreth Land 17 " 500.00 

Meadow Land 5 " 275.00 

Swan Land 5 " 200.00 

S. S. Rogers Street 2.69 " 300.00 

N. S. First Street 57,768 sq. ft. 1,500.00 

Spruce Street 17,457 " 150.00 

W. S. Billerica Road 145,513 " 400.00 

Clark Road 3 acres 900.00 

$10,525.00 



Xfl 

W 

in 



p 
E 

H 

o 
pc; 

Ph 

o 

3 
pq 

Ph 



© 

© 

LO 

lo 

cm" 

CO 

r^ 

<*9 



o 


o o 


o 


o o 


© 


© © 


lo 


LO O 


© 


T-* © 






VO 


CO LO 


o 


CM 



o 
o 

8 

CO 



o 
o 


o o 

o o 


c 
o 


© 

LO 

l-O 


© © 
© ir ; 
CM rvj 


© 

CM 


CM 


rC cm" 


cm" 



o 
o 

© 
o 



o 

o 



LO 

CM 



Zfr 



© 
00 
CM 



in N M 

"3- co 0O 

co lo co 

vo "* "* 



o 

LO 



— 



o 
o 

LO 

c\f 



2 © 
rt o 

> © 

03 © 

tuC © 

.5 ©" 

-a ^"2 

s t t 

3 m- 



© © © © 

o o o o 

© © © o 

o © o o 

O Tf LO LO 

© t-T cm" 

© tT 
CM 



en 



© o 

o o 

© © 

o o 

CO 00 



© 


© 
O 


© 
© 


© 
© 


c 
c 


© 

© 


© 

© 
— > 


© 
© 
©> 


© 
© 
© 


© 

© 
©^ 


© 
© 

©_ 


© 

c 

LO 


LO 

CM 


^f" 


00~ 


LO~ 

CO 


co' 


CM* 



m 

o 

E 



be 

'3 
pq 



03 



**3 . 
as m 

Ih 

o <^ 

o „ 



as 
en 

Ph 



co en g: 



o en 

x: "5 ^ 

^2 a! co 

S* 8 

fee •" -a 

G fc G 

_ a! 



C/2 



•2 a; co /£ 73 



a5 









u 

"o 
- 



03 

G L- 

a! "5 
be ^ 
.G »-i 

a! Ph 

G- T3 



O ^ 4) M 

» C 3 -J5 

as tuo fcjD > . 



a! 

u 



tts 

O 

bp co 



O 



U Dh J 



-G ^ (13 

'G 'G -G 

^ ^ CJ 

W pq -g 

G G Ll 

*° *^ _: 

O O T3 

° ° G 



O 
L0 



2 -5 

'g g 

CC oo 

•8.8 

« -C pq 

J pq ^ 

<u o u 
be ,-^j <u 

as m -m 



a! ,> N 
U CM 



ai 



a! 

-a 

a! 

O 

pq 



v 
o 

a; 45 

be en 



as J^ 
biO T 



T3 
O 
O 



-^ 
o 



u 



Uh 



33 -2 



PP 



X 
C/] 


c 
c 


03 


^ 


buo 




.2 




Irt 


-r 


u 


03 


rt 


X 


U 


X 



13 

5=1 
• i— i 

o 



<u 
-M 
aS 

+j 

w 

03 

H 

123 

9 

<s 

Ph 

w 

p 

CO 

w 

CO 

W 

t—i 
^ 

P 
H 

w 

PM 

O 

Ph 

i— i 

P 
£> 
Ph 



o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
© 


© 
io 

O 


©' 

o 


© 

o 
-1- 


o 


CO 
1— I 





te- 



O CD O 

© CD CD 

CD CD CD 

lo O O 

fO N Tt 

co" cm" 

CM 






B © 

rt O 

> CD 

w © 

6j0 »0 

.5 cm" 
2 

'3 <be 

pa 



o o 
o © 

© CD 

O O 

iO O 

CO 



o o o 
© © © 
© o* © 
o © © 
OOM 

vo" 00" 



© 
CO 
ON 

o" 

OO 



© 

© 

CD 
© 
© 



be 









j- 








<u 








-4-^ 


"O 






c 


o 




ojc 


<u 


O 




*o 


Ch 
Ih 

ctS 






r^ 


u 


/ ^- 




3 








PQ 


bfl 


V 

G 






•5 






u 




a; 




PQ 


'5 


^ 




>> 


PQ 


<u 




u 




m 




o 




w 




-i-l 
CO 


53 


bJO 




CO 


o 


J3 




c3 


o 










PQ 




Ih 


>> 

Ih 


O 


"C 


53 


o 

in 


m 




i- 




CM 


X 


U 


CM 



*v3 
O 
O 






u 

CO 



U 



bfl 



-o 

as 
O 

Ih 

PQ 



rt 



o o 



^3 

< co 



-o 
u 
o 



JD 

u 



OS 

3 

<J PQ 
be 
^ 3 <u 



U 



fe 



•a 



P4 S 



be -^ 
a m 



© 
© 

© 
© 

cm" 

©^ 



© 
© 

© 
© 

po" 
"i- 

CM 



© 
o 

©' 
© 

CM 

On" 
CM 

00 



o © © © © o © 

© O © © © CD © 

©' O ©'©'©'© ©' 

© O © © O © © 

©^00 © "^r to CM^ *^- 

io" cm' rt" t-T 

CM 



P o 



C3 •- 



C£ 



PQ 



OJ 



130 Jr. 

C X cn bC (U <V 

CJ o <u "^ rt ••"' 

J S ^ ^ C/3 > 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 159 



FIRE DEPARTMENT— PERSONAL PROPERTY 

Valuation 

Chief's Office $ 7,619.32 

Repair Shop 579.00 

Engine Co. No. 1, Gorham Street 8 ,767.13 

No. 2, Branch Street 9,389.00 

No. 3, Palmer Street 7,773.30 

No. 4, High Street 5,172.50 

No. 5, Mammoth Road 2,950.00 

No. 6, Fletcher Street 6,592.60 

Hose Co. No. 7, Central Street 2,566.95 

No. 8, Merrimack Street 2,000.85 

No. 9, Lincoln Street 2,539.14 

No. 10, Fourth Street 3,955.30 

No, 11, Lawrence Street 1,966.60 

No. 12, West Sixth Street 2,443.65 

Hook & Ladder No. 1, Lawrence Street 2,429.25 

No. 2, Westford Street 3,517.91 

No. 3, Palmer Street 5,169.55 

No. 4, West Sixth Street 6,559.78 

Protective No. 1, Warren Street 4,327.60 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 47,327.00 



Total Fire Department Personal $133,647.33 



rt 



H 

w 



JOOO 
3 O O O 

^ o o o 

>0 O >n 
__ co m O 

5 rC — r *o" 
org oo on 



o o o 

o o p 

o o o 

lO LO O 

On fO ^ 

\o io od 

M H 't 



o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


© 
© 


o 
o 
oo 


o 
m 

i — i 


o 
o 


o 
o 
CM 


o 

IT) 

NC 


o 
o 
-I- 


o 
in 



(M00O00\0000\N 



i— I CM 



C\) CO r— I 



O 

o 

o 
o 

oo" 

On 
CO 



-c o 
c o 

J© 






ooooooooooooooo 
oooooppoooooooo 

ooooopo'oooooooo 

O lo O m l/") o o o O LO O O LO O to 

IO N fO Ov 00 X ^ iH00rHiO(NliO'*\O 

co cm" in" cm' i-T i-T t-T 



co no On t— ( 
CM 



CM 



CD 

o 

© 
o 
■<* 

tC 

oo 
&>- 



OOONOLO^HMDLOOOOcooOOOLO 
M^ - M\0't(Nl00O\0f00M')0\HTt 
OO N to io fO -- iOnlOOOnOn<OCONOnO 
00" CM t^ m" m" co" oo" co' co" r4 no" oo" On" Tf*" r-T 
CM i—i 



en o 

J;© 
2 © 

•3°- 

> 



o © 

© s 

O © 

© © 

^H NO 



co 



4-1 

CO 


CO 


s 


B 

-O 


o 


Oh 




rt 





O 






O 


CQ 




hj 




CO 


'/-. 






3 


- 




r 




Uh 


<u 


<u 


rt 


C 


C 


S-. 






4— » 


b£ 


bfl 


f^ 


c 


£ 


o 


W 


w 


u 



o o o 
p p © 
o o o 
o o o 
o_ lo o 
m" ^f o 

CM r-H CM 



O 



i CO 

co © fc 

cuo 5 +J 

£^ w 



©©0000©0 
00<3000<Oo 

OOoOOOOo 
©©0©0©Oo 
v\ p o © © © © © 

©" co" vo no" io" 00 00 t-T 
t— i CM *— i CM CO r- ( ,— i 



o 
o 

© 
o 
o 



CO 



CO 



4-J »^ 4-J 4J 

CO ^ CO CO 

rt S -P -p 

H C O t 

JH >- W 3 

S ^ .3 o ns 

U ^ _1 fe H-l 



M CO ^ 

co x: co 

*o CO 



G CO 

U 4-1 



<y <U 



3 „ 

O " " - " " " --- 

EC 

.s .s .s .s .s .s .s .s .s .s .s 

Sd '5b 'So '5o 5b '5b 5b bib So So "So 

WWW wwwwwwww 



u 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


~ 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


— 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


ed 
> 


o 


o d 


d 


o 


d 


d 


© 


d © 


© 


d © 


o 


© o 


o 


o 


irj 


to 


o 


o o 


o 


O LO 


, i 


o 


o oo 


CO 


VO 


lO 


lO 


o 


VO 00 


Tf 


o o 


a 






















Tf 


i— 1 CM 


1" < 


**■ 




V— H 


CO 


VO t^ 


"* 


O ^f 















1— ( 


1—1 


CM 




co 


H 




















1—1 



</3- 



— 
- 


§ 


o 

o 


c 
o 


O 

© 


O 
O 


d 


d 

CD 
PC. 


d 

o 
o 


d 


d 

LO 


d 
o 
o 


cm" 




rvf 




r-J 


u-r 



4«e- 



o o o 

o o o 

odd 
o o o 

CO O "^ 
CM~ VO ^f 
CM 



o o 
o o 

d d 

O LO 

<o c\T 



< 

Pm 
W 
P 

CO 

M 
P3 
o 






CD 

w 

Pd 






be 



x 



o 
o 
d 
o 
o 






CM 


CO 
co 


CM 

LO 

CM 


CO 


o 

Tl- 
IO 


o 
CM 

CO 


X 

-I 


LO* 


tvT 




LO~ 

1—1 


vo" 
VO 



o 

OS 

OO 

oo 

LO* CO 

LO CO 



o 

o 
d 
o 
o 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



-a 
CO jy 
| | 

5 £ 
U 



u .g 

.o rG CO 

<& G 

G -^ G 

- .y 5 

>- u 



OS 



ni G O 

1 I * 

<u -O 

H cm 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



CO aT 

^ CO 

*G ^ 

aJ o 

. -G 

> rt 

co pq 



co ■ 



T3 
O 

o 

h < 



u 



o 

P 

*- rP 

^ is 

o 

-£ rt 

rf p 
-^ o 

.P 

t^ 

jv> u 

■go 

pq 



o 
o 

d 
<o 

o 



o o 

o o 

d d 

o o 

o o 



o o o 

o o o 

odd 

o o o 

LO 00 CM 



CO CM i—i i—i 



o o 
o o 

d d 
o o 

o, o 

0~ to" 

O i-i 



i-i co 

LO CO 



00 



o o 

o o 

d d 

o o 

O vo 



CM 






> > 

< < 

5 5 



"* > 



, -i-i 



<u 

*° .s 

P '55 

^ as c« 

% ■* PQ 

a^ "P 

fe H^ fe 



03 
> 

"p 

.S-g 

« "J 

O V 
'+3 p 

a3 o 

co M 

•P p 

a o 

£ ffi 



<u 

< 

B 

p 

03 , 
> CO 

P > 

iP <u 



GO 
aJPQ PQ 



Ph 5? 



3 

o 
E 

G 



X) 
G 
oS 



CO 

CO 

+j 

in 
<u 

O a; 

"! co 



co 

CO 



<L> CO 



CO 



rt CO 



bJD oS 



CO 






> .P 



G rt 



— p4 S 



p js 

■> t« G 

£ G O 

Q U PQ 



B -° 

G rt 

Pu oo 



CO 



o 

d 



h3 
<v 
P" 

o 



+j 
a 
■*-> 

Xil 

w 

f-H 

cu 

« 

M 
H 

<l 

Ph 
W 
P 

CO 

M 

P3 

o 
w 

H 





o 


es 


cu 

3 


o 


o 


"3 
> 


o 


© 


LO 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


"3 


VO" 


c\f 


o 


1-H 


CO 


h 


se- 





o 
o 

© 

o 

VO 

od 
oo 



o 
o 
o 
o 
"*■ 

vO~ 

CM 



-o © o 

c o o 



s ° 

o to 



m- 




o 
c 

© 
o 

VO 

cm" 



o 

o 



O O 

<J "* CM 



tuO 







o 






LO 






cm 


O © C\ 


o 


cm 


ro ^t O 


o 




0\ vo ^ 


VO 










"^" lO i— i 


T— i 




OO ph ro 


LO 




SO r- 1 lo 


VO 





T3 O 
S3 O 

Ǥ' 

o> O 
£ to- 
ed »— i 



CO 



o 

O 

© 
o 
o 



o o o o o o 

© © © © © © 

© O © O © © 

o o o o o o 

© © O ©_ ©^ m 

u-T © r-4" o lo" 

r>x r^ y— > cm 



G 

a 
cj 



O 
> 

■- "G 

<U G 

Cfl CJ 

0& u 

Q 

cu ^ 



_G 

Ph 



cd 



u 



.2 ^ 

CO O 



CO 

Jm 

o 



cd 

co 



bo 



G G 



Cm <U 

go 



s 


"cd 


CD 

en 


,G 

u 


CD 


X 






U 


M-H 

o 


cd 


•d 




"> 


i— i 




Lh 


rt 


o 


CD 

CO 


_G 




o 


s 


i — i 


J 



CD 



. G 
*-' O 
CO •« 



O 

> o 

S « 2 

.3 K £ 

> v 3 

s- bo o 

<L» G hrl 

CO CG hh 

>. CD CD 

O !> rt 

J Q O 



T3 
v- 

> 

CD 

o 
2 PQ 
CO , 

bo 

bo _C 

•S -5 
Cm :g 

S G 



PQ 



CD 

o 

o 



o 

o 

o 
o 

r— I 

vd 
r^ 
^f 
<^ 



c 
o 

LO^ 

so" 

CM 



SO 
vo" 
CM 
CO* 

LO 
LO^ 

r— ( 



o 

o 
o 

vo 





o 




>4 


u 




-fJ 






^H 






CD 


'■ 


>. 


Pi 


CD 


u 


O 


Cm 


CD 


Ph 


s 


Cm 



I- 


13 


>^ 


Ph 


rt 


u 


^H 


o 

C/3 


CD 




^M 


r- 1 





CD 

Ph 


CJ 


Ui 




S 


Ph 



.5 o 

CO 

» .G 

G "^ 



3 ss 

IBS 

ea cm" ^r 

-co o 

,° (V) ^-< 



ooooooooooo oo 

ooooooooooo oo 

ooooooooooo oo" 

OloOOOOOOOOlo O lo 

0_ CM^ 0_ i-H 10 O © On o_ © ^t l\ cm_ 

oo" o" o" o" co" o" on r^T cm" <o" ^" <*5 lo" 

^CM(NtS(VJCVJMOfOtsO CM OO 



o o 

o o 

© o 

o o 

t^ 00 

co" cm" 

CM lo 



<o 
o 

© 

o 

NO* 
CM 



o o o o 

o o o o 

© © o © 

lo ON O O 

On 00 vo lo 

o" cm" on" Tt 

»—< on »— • 



-o o 

CO 
D O 

.5 cm" 

c«co 



9 

H 
PM 

w 
p 

o 
o 

w 

CO 



w 

I— ( 



3 


O 


3 


3 


r? 


o 




o 


o 


3 


3 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


3 


o 


3 


o 




o 


o 


o 


3 


o 


o 


3 


cr 


o 


3 


3 


o 


o 




o 


o 


3 


3 


o 


o 


o 


3 


o 


lO 


3 


3 


o 




o 


o 


o 


: s 


LO 


o 


LO 


rt 


o 


CM 


3 


1 — 1 


LO 




o 


ON 


o 


o 


Tl- 


r^ 


CM 


irj 


00 


3 


re 


LO 


m 




-t 


t^s 


r^. 


X 


'St 


»— i 


3 


CM 












B 

o 

E 
E 
o 

U 

d 




^1- 








i— i 


i—i 



0)00000000 

ooooo>oooo 
oo'ooooooo 

O O m lo O lo On OO 

n oq ?o ih h a oo^ no^ lo^ 
lo" lo" i— r o" cm" «-^ cm" 



:ON <D <— ' >-" 
'»-( ^ 00 'l- 



O L^x 
CM lo 






3 M3 lo "O 

! t— T o" cm" oo" o" lo" rC t-J 

1 co i— ' CM NO i— ' CM »— ' 



CM 

o 

LO 



o ^t- i-i 

O CM LO 

O ON ^r 



on o <o 

i— < O LO 



CM NO 
ro cm 
lo^ CM^ 

lo" i— r 

i— I LO 



OOOOi^fLOO-^t-ON 
ONOOiOCMCM^OOco 
LO rH ON >o N vq_ CM_ i—^ LO 

on" no" co co" i-T rC cm" co" oo" 

CO CO rn rf- N H 



.Hoooooooooooooooo 
^oooooooooooooooo 

■roooooo'oo'ooo'o'o'ooo 
cgoooooooooooooooo 
~ o_^ o O o^ o^ o ©_ o^ o^ ©_ © © o^ ©^ o^ 
a o" on" o" o* rC lo" o" o" lo" o" lo" lo" o" oo" ^t" lo" 
— Ot^i— 'i— it-inoCMCMi— "vOCMNOO t^ 

rtCM <-■ ^h i— 

>^9- 



o o o 
o o o 

o © o' 
o o o 
o. ©_ o^ 

OO" IN." lo" 

i— i Tt CM 



o o o o 

o o o o 

© © o © 

o o o o 

© o^ © ©_ 

o o" oo" cm" 

© On »— i 



00 
t bfl 



in 



•*-> r r3 









o 
u 

o 



fl o 



t/] 



C/} O 



(75 
+-> 

o 

c5 oo 



.^' 00 



^ ^ o ^ - O 






o o 

^-r o o 

O J3 X 

O <-> a 

J2 00 00 

bjo "C "£ 

ffi a a 



t3 ^ 

00 - 



o 

o 

00 



u< — Ti 



00 



00 -r 



-o 

c 

CJ 

03 






gw.«2 
w 

<L» 00 -g 

^•a 00 



a3 rt 

> o 

2 bis 

PQ .S 

o ^ 



Crt '"Si 

a; 

pfij w 

^ -a 

B ° 



o 
o 



03 

o 

-00 

S £ 

E g 

03 J2 



Ph 



. 00 



. 00 



s 

00 bC 03 
be 

< 






a 



u _ 00 oo 



u. g c -.j _, 

^ ^ o -g S 



pq 









•J 



. o 
<u -F- cj 

^ .2? c 

rh 'T 1 '" 

U M I 1 



g '0 
g o 

03 O 



>, 
•g 
o 
o 



o _r 

o o 

-c o 

00 cj 

«; ^ 00 

oo^^ 

be i u 



E I 



a. c^ 



s ° 

™ o 

«- -g 

o y 

o oo 

^ I 

£ 9 

g" ^b 



o ™ 
o S 

00 Ph 



03 

> (A 

be S 

< < 



g O O 

►> O O 

^O^ *-h 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooooooooooooooo 

OlOOOloOloOOOOOOOOOloOOOloloOlo 
ro vq^ q q^ ■* ^ M; O^ O rn q ro IN a ^ i^ fO K tv^ lo Tf In CM i— • 

lo" e\f cm" Tt-" mo" mo" lo' >+ ro od "^ ^" r-T rf oo" oC tC tj-" o" co" cm" mo" oC "3-" 

N lO ri t— ( CM CM i— i CM *— i i-H (\j ,_ ,_, CM 



TJO O 

coo 

Id o 
- 1 o o 

V O »— < 



o o o 
•o o o 
o o o 

O lo o 

(^ q q 
lo" cm" -tf-" 



o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o> 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 



o o o o o o o 
o o o> o o o o 

00*000000000000000000 

loOloOOOOOOOOOloOOOloioOlo 

^ ^ ^ °~ ""I *~1 ^ r *"l ^ "^ """i °„ °° ^ ^ °~ "^ *^ ^H *-i 
>» rt*~ t-T «rT cm" -^ lo" cm" «-T ro" r-T mo* cm" c\f «-T r-T <rf 

L-l 

p 







PL, 



CO 



o 

o 



CO 



o3 
<L> 



OS 



1) 

u 



o ^o lo 00 o 

rt O On CM O O 



^oor-xoot^oooioo^ 



O CM 
cm to 



£ o q q o\ q ^ 1- 1 cm^ 06 o <oS q ^f cm_ cm <o\ i-l cm 
•< o" <r>" oC 00" o* /"| «-T 10" on" 00" in" 00" *n" ^ oC mo" mo o* cm" 

CM iH 



SHS 



oiooorNOoo 

OMDcoOOPvlOTf 

O 0_ IN 0_ lo ih tJ-^ 0_ 

o* o" MO* co oC ©~ Cn* 

»— I 1— I 1-H to 



w 

H 

Ph 

w 
p 

o 
o 

w 

t/2 



!°° 

2 o o> 
•300 

w o o 
3LO " 



— i-H r-H CM LO 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooooooooooooooo 

00000000000000000 o'oooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooo 

O O^ O^ 0_ O^ O^ O^ O^ q O^ O^ O O^ lO O lo O^ O^ O^ LO O^ O O O^ 

o" o*~ 00" ^ cm" lo~ <nT cm" 00" <rf c^f co" 00" «rT cm" t>T tC -^ 00" cm" cm" md" 00" 



CM CM 



CM 



CM 

















■4- 

ir. 

J. 

u 

L 



























bo 
C 



PQ c 



O 
O 

a 

CD 



be 






CO 



1/3 



^. ^ CO ^ ^ ^ CO 



c/3 



co 



C/3 



CO 



CO 



C/J 




O « 


> 


13 jy 

Oh 1- 


1^ — I 


ri 


.a u 


<v 


n3 rt 


.' li 


u 


rt ct3 


JZ 


X! X 


pq 


U 


u u 


V 


u u 



a; 

be J- 



C CO C/3 CO „, CO 



C/3 



h CO 



< < 



CO 



bJO S 



X) .O 

MD "5 
O 

s 



CO 



L- O 

|0 



ro s~ o 
>Ph J 

X J- 3 a 



^ * £ co co 



mV 



o ij g^ >^ iu — '2 c -s s*2o't 
rt rtjuxxi o o vhO cti rt 1-— 'O--; ni a; o >> ° yS "^ ii; ^ 



<v 

•l-H 

o 
O 



CO 



a 
H 

H 

P3 
< 
Ph 
W 
P 

Hi 

o 

O 

H 

o 

02 





O 


— 


a 


O 


— 




O 


~ 


> 


lO 


i') 


ON 


M 


rt 


CM 


tv 


o 


CM 




H 







69- 



— O O 

S ^ <=? 

rt O o 

« ^^ 

3 CM i— i 



69- 



os r>. 

rt CO SO 

< SO" i-T 



'5 
- 

a 
cd 
> 



CD O 

O O 

O O 

O O 

o" so" 
CM 



69- 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooo 

0"^OiO«-OLOOiOOCD 
CM 0\ CM «-^ LO^ O OS r>^ Os^ co^ 

y— " o" •— " tC cm" i-T »— r cm" oo" oo" 

i— i CM t— < '— < »— t CM 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooo 

O LO O «J"> >■»"< >-0 O "5 o o 

CM Os CM^ SO^ lo i— i OS r^ Os <0 

co" <o" cm" cm" i-T t-T oo" 



^J-OcoOsSOOcO'— ' co rf 

^-GOOSO'+coCDi— i *— I TT 

rf 00 sq_ 00^ 0_ t^. OS CM 0\ O 

\o" Os" so" go" Os o" oo" to Cm" «-T 

CM r-H ,-H ,-H ,— ! ,-H ,-H 



o o o o o 

o o o o o 

o o o o o 

o o o o o 

o o o to o 



--i k oo -t rsi oo 



o o o o 

o o o o 

O* O O o 

o o o o 

o o o o 

o" cm" rC o" 

i-H CM 



o 
o 
x 

co 

<u 

J 
w 



>, 



So 



> 



- 



CO ^ 



JH ^0 Ph 

T3 



>, 



o 

PL, 



c 






m 



m 

*0 

o 



^ .§ s 

+J _ u *c 

CO Ph a, 

o ^ CO 

£ x -o 

u 



Ph 

aj 

<l 

+J Pu 
CO . 



Ph 



C CO 

*d -G CO 

o .* c 

X CO £ 



■-H U >> ^ >-> >> ^ ^> 

PhCOCOH>J>>> 



o 
o 


O 
CD 


o 
o> 


o 
o 


o 

Os 

l-O 


rf 

r— 1 
SO 


o 

o 
o 


^1- 

o 

CM 


o 
rf 

o 


CM 
CM 


SO 
co 

T-H 


rf 

o 


CM 
69- 






CM 
69- 



o 
o 

o 
Os 

so" 
CM 
CO 
69 



CD 
O 

o 

o> 

rf" 

!>._ 

T-H 

69- 



•o 


O 


^ 


o 


rt 


r- 


i ! 


u 




t/; 






O 



Xi 


be 


u 


rt 


:/; 


X 






^ 


tu 


c/; 


<u 




u 


ffi O 



o 
o 

o" 

o 

CO 

rt-" 

lO 

69- 



d) 

Ph 
O 

?H 

Ph 

"as 
o 

«2 

Ph 

Ph 



ft 



X5 



CO o 

a 'd 



3 ! 

'G ^ 

C cu 



oo 

oo-o 

oo 2 

«v=> 83 

OS*— I «-h 

CM 



oooooooo oooooooooooo o 

OOOOOOOO*0OOOOOOOOOOOO*0O 

ooo'ooooo* ^looo'ooooo'oooo & O w 
ooo>JTomom ^i^. O O O O OiOiO o o o o 2oo 



CM 



^ CM CO 

CM 



>oo 
>oo 

o oo 
ooo 

© O On 
o"t-Tio 



o 
o 

CO 



<U O O 

.5 oo 

rt do 

> oo 

c On '— < 

rt CM 



^.oooooooo^, oooooooooooo^ 

^300000000^000000000000*0 
<U ^ ^ ,_; ^ _; ^ ^ ^.-, <U , „• _^ _^ „.; _; _; _; ^ ^ „ ; _; _; <u 



O OOOO' 



'OOOOOOOOOOOO 



rtOOOLOLOu-5<ou-) n sl^oO>OOOLT>L0OO'OO 

jyOO'-iirKM'H'HoOiH <£ -- i cm r^ o <o cm cm t- 'oqcnqto 






T-H C\! 



^i-r^oc 
^-j- cm 

CM 



o 
o 

o 
o 

°1 



« lOOsO 
y NOJO 
CXI On "* 

^o'c\f 



Uh 



COCMn^iOCOrOTtXM 

CNOVO'trHrHONTfrHMO 



OCM 

o^ 
in 



T-H t^ 



CM 



CM 



lOlO o 

t-h r-^ t-h 

CM On CM^ 
Cm" t-h" 



CO On O O 

•o^oqcq 

T-TcOCM'or 

T-Hf^ T-H 

ON 



CM 

00 
CO 



Q 

& 

H 

P-i 

w 

R 

PS 

P4 



P3 



o 



ON 
CO 



o 
o 



s 
"3 

> 

to 

s 



o 

o 

o 
o 



Oh 

u >h r i_ 

nj rt <u crj T-. 

^ &<^ > 

o en ' 53 O 

cu j- rt nH _^ 

* > § ot;'u 
CU o o o~ 
CQ U U tx. C 



2cq 



XPh 

o 

<u 

to T3 

>h (/) 
Ur > 1 



OJ 



^cn £ 

rt _ rt 

2 C T- 

cro ^ 

en £c/;> 



J* 
u 

V-, Jh 

rt g rd 

3 r; — ' 



w 



>>^c v. 

V cj o 

O 5 



- 1 TH " 

O ^ « TO 



en 
^ o 



PH 



fcj cu 



£ £h— J 



C r- U 



ni •. 



c ■ • 



J J <h ^, <<; <; ,--. Oh 



O ri 0> 

* rt -Pu 



3$ 

cr 
en. 



6a< 



=. > 5 V 4> 

^ (J >- 

cph 



V <u <u 
u > > 



E b.°<< 



p p 



s S 

1- -— ' 



o 5 



a P 



C ' 



•'O c 

>" T" .3 V- T" 

ci ci d rj rt 



C/3 

W 

Xfl 

O 
P-i 

P-t 

o 

H 



W 
H 

R 

o 
R 

< 



7; r- 1 



Pi 



co 



bo s 

.S c/3 



O 3 

c rt 

o 



o 
o 

■ f. CM 






m- 



CO 

CO ™ 



co 



o 

o 

CO 

CM 
"3- 



o 



o 

o 

o 
o 

LO 



o 

CO 



C 1- ■ -< v- 

o o 

D + J « Ifl ifl 

c S £^ S 

£ .G ^ «-. Q-> 

o ^ — -^ 
03 u V 

^G O 

G <~o 



u 

*-h ro *^ co 

++ ++ <y-H- 

5 +J CO 

'■3 ^ 

TO C 

o , , G 

o o rt 

oo 



o 

o 

CM 

rO 

CO 



co 



> 



> 



bt 



CO 



l U .U " •.-• 

- £ o3 -o 



c n3 

J a C 

mom 
o <^i o 

<~0 On CM 





IS 


C/J 




Vh 


_G 




rt 




rj 


4-1 


"S 





CO 


c 


IS 


Q 


2 


C 


C/5 
1) 


s 


Ih 




rt 


OJ 


Ih 






oS 




> 




COU 


g 


c 


O 


lO 


c 


o 


On 


o 


o 


>o 


c 


On 


lO 



'v© 



03 


U 


rt 


CO 


CG 


° - c 


J2 «J & 




tH . " 




<U X! . 


coUH 


ooo 


o^oo 


Ot-h'o 


mo\o 


vo o 


VOC\f 



in 

O^ON 
CO^I- CM 
On CO LO 

cvfcrfo 



(J M-H 

co OO on CO ^q 

"^ co£^o 

fO —i ^1" NO 



-rJ-"CO co" 

^-OOro 



ro "nO 

T-H 

CM 



o o 

0OK 



o > 
f o 
""A 

>-, 

,a pi 



a; 



CO'* 



Dh 



cicoO^c 

-Q G On O 

c /r;'-| -a3 

o3 »— i 



X 
<u 

G 
G 
a3 

COn-O „ 
-H--H-* 



^~ -I" -f 

OnOncK 
CO CO 5g 



> > (J 

O O <u 



r O On r-^ 

CNONfs. 
CO CO CO 



O 
CM 









oo 






oo 






oo 






oo 






oo. 






co'o" 






Tf»-I 






v±y> 




oc 






oc 






oc 






oc: 






oc: 






CO'"~ 






CT 






^> 




rt 








o 








'T-i 








+* 








03 

























ct 








> 










-i- 


<v 




4_, <L 


Ch 




aj <J- 


o 




OJ t 


u 




bo" 


Oh 




CO 


^^ 




p 


03 




*o « 


§ 




o-f 


en 




X ^ 


u 




O C 


<u 




cr 


O PL, 



G 

O 

G 



<DC0 

+J^ 03 

fe C »- 
H o3 O 

co^O 

I— i 

Or*) G 

O^ O 
•^ G 

y O >> 

CO !- 

° ii G 

Id £^ 

U O 

^ ^^ 



o 
^o 

•■=8 

Do 

^§ 

■4-J »" ' 



Si « 

£ ° 

G ° 

^ G 

<y O _T G 

S?iH G 
W oo ^ X 

•s .«§ 

G 1 P_ 



.G d 



h rxj co 



168 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



LOANS NEGOTIATED BY THE CITY SINCE 1900 
AND HOW EXPENDED 



Year Loans 

1900 $288,500.00 

1901 256,100.00 

1902 222,885.00 

1903 387,320.00 

1904 254,414.00 

1905 360,150.00 

1906 247,460.00 

1907 365,500.00 

1908 304.413.00 

1909 172,900.00 

1910 241,000.00 

1911 412,450.00 
1912* 546,700.00 

1913 542,700.00 

1914 343,500.00 

1915 493,000.00 

1916 647,100.00 

1917 780,000.00 

1918 177,000.00 

Temporary Loan Deficiencies of previous years — $200,000. 



Improvements 


Current Expenses 


Waterways 


$191,000.00 


$ 22,500.00 


$ 75,000.00 


206,100.00 


50,000.00 




186,385.00 


36,500.00 




183,820.00 


203,500.00 




167,714.00 


86,700.00 




232,150.00 


128,000.00 




149.440.00 


71,000.00 


27,000.00 


229,500.00 


136,000.00 




189.413.00 


115,000.00 




172.900.00 


none 




161,000.00 


20,000.00 


60,000.00 


251,450.00 


61,000.00 


100,000.00 


230,700.00 


241,000.00* 


75,000.00 


320,700.00 


147,000.00 


75,000.00 


253,500.00 


none 


90,000.00 


34,300.00 


none 


150,000.00 


592,100.00 


none 


55,000.00 


780,000.00 


nonef 




147,000.00 


30,000.00 • 





EXPENDITURE, TAX RATE, VALUATION FROM 1860 



Year 

1860 
1865 
1870 
1875 
1880 
1885 
1890 
1895 
1900 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Expenditures 

$ 267,192.07 
756,342.81 
778,636.03 
1,162,922.95 
1,398,683.48 
1,833,483.69 
3,613,584.04 
2,903,410.60 
2,353,844.41 
2,738,502.84 
2,795,000.75 
2,718,874.34. 
3,046,987.96 
2,791,607.95 
2,887,399.24 
2,873,195.26 
2,847,482.13 
3,112,853.71 
3,093.197.15 
3,207,407.84 
3,443,043.82 
3,835,043.80 
4,026,944.67 



Tax Rate 

$ S.40 
14.60 
13.90 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.00 
18.00 
18.80 
20.20 
19.60 
19.40 
20.40 
19.60 
19.60 
18.90 
19.00 
19.40 
21.90 
20.80 
21.20 
23.40 
23.80 



Total 
City Valuation 

$22,125,176.00 
21.076,360.00 
25,972,488.00 
38,090,495.00 
41,102,016.00 
51,351,780.00 
62,353,612.00 
68,885.732.00 
71,529,515.00 
71,645,718.00 
74,945.640.00 
76.079,750.00 
77,855.891.85 
79,695,960.00 
80,392.890.00 
82,772.900.00 
85,384.085.00 
87,872,600.00 
90.039,89000 
82,954,197.00 
94,503.423.00 
90,820,901.50 
98,774,850.00 



f$15,000.00— Spanish Influenza Epidemic ;$15,000.00 German War. 



OOOOOOOO 

oooooooo 

OOOOOOOO 
OOOnOOOOO 
O O CSj vo o o o^ 

f\j lo l— r vo »-o w~r 

1-H t— 1 



^ 



o 
o 


o 

o 


o 


o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 


o 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 

0\ 


o 

o> 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 
o 
© 


o~ 


o" 




c\f 


CO 


o~ 

<^3 


o' 


VO 



<fr 



o 



to t ^- ^t ■* Tt ^t- 






H 
PP 

P 



C5 



o\ Os ON 

° ° ^ 

O ON C^ 



p 



On 






o 


1-^ 


,— . 


C\ 








J-i 


J- 




<v 


OJ 


o* 


J=l 


XI 


r-H 














<v 


o 


OJ 




-*~> 



"St- Tf 

On On 



CO 

ON 



JO 









3 1/ J; !* 



a, o 



C/5 






"O" -O 



CO 


rt 






j* 


fc£ 


m 






rt 


*> 


o 
a; 






T5 


cu 


C/3 


PQ 


P. 


c75 



bfl 



£ 3 ^ 

* £ E 



CO 






170 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



HIGH STREET CHURCH CLOCK 

The clock was built in 1861 under the direction of Mr. George Hed- 
rick. It was to be paid for by popular subscription, but after some time 
Mr. Hedrick was obliged to make the final payments and it became his 
property. In 1877 the City Government, by resolution, purchased the 
clock of Mr. Hedrick. The terms of purchase required the City to keep 
it in repair at the High Street Church. 



COST OF CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL BUILDING 

1889-1895— Cost of City Hall $382,317.48 

1889-1895 Cost of Memorial Building 175,928.45 

Land and Curbing 17,219.43 

Total $575,465.36 



PAYMENTS MADE TO SINKING FUNDS IN 1918 

Amount Fund 

City Hall and Memorial Buildings, due 1920 $ 7,500.00 $ 450,000.00 

High School, due 1921 3,000.00 150.000.00 

New School Houses, due 1926 4,000.00 200,000.00 

Water Loans, due 1920 16,000.00 1,000,000.00 

$30,500.00 $1,800,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 



Personal Real Estate 

Valuation Valuation Totals 

Literary Institutions $ 140,846.90 $ 466,895.00 $ 697,641.90 

Temperance Institutions 3,365.85 16,350.00 19.715.85 

Benevolent Institutions 35,423.62 97,750.00 133,173.62 

Charitable Institutions 873,222.67 487,440.00 1,360,662.77 

Scientific Institutions 406,420.29 486,650.00 893,070.29 

Houses of Religious Worship .... 2,322,750.00 2,322,750.00 

$1,459,279.43 $3,877,835.00 $5,327,114.43 

The total real estate area exempt, 115,806.1000 acres. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 171 



Jonathan Tyler Worthy Poor Trust Fund 

Deposited with the Washington Inst, for Savings, Book No. 23549. 

Amount on deposit, Jan. 1, 1918 $10,000.00 

Resolutions, numbered 14 and 74. passed by the City Council, May, 1878: 
"That the City of Lowell be appointed trustee of the sum of $10,000.00, 
and that the City Treasurer is authorized to pay to the Ministry-at- 
Large the interest of said sum at the rate of 6 per cent, forever. Said 
sum to be used for the benefit of the worthy poor of the City. Said 
Ministry shall make an annual report of their dispensing said money 
to the City Council." This fund was restored in 1914, and City is 
paying 4 per cent. only. 

Thomas Nesmith Fund 

$25,000.00 Annual Interest, $1,500.00 

Resolution, numbered 57, passed by the City Council, November, 1870 : 
"That the sum of $25,000.00 be accepted by the City and that the in- 
terest, at the rate of 6 per cent., be paid to the trustees, and that they 
in turn pay to the Ministry-at-Large or to like people, as they may 
decide. Said sum to be used for people in temporary need of charity 
without distinction of race, color or religion. Trustees : A. K. Chad- 
wick, A. G. Cumnock, Thos. Nesmith, G. R. Chandler, Treasurer. In 
case of a vacancy, the remaining trustees shall report to the Justice 
of the Court, who shall appoint a successor to fill said vacancy." Not 
a trust fund. 



Carney Medal Fund 

Received of James G. Carney, in 1858 and 1859, the amount of $200, 
which is to remain a perpetual debt of the City forever; the interest 
to be applied in payment for the "Carney Medals" to the departments 
of the High School (annually). 
For the information of the citizens of Lowell the Auditor respectfully 

refers them to the "Annual Report of the School Committee," for the year 

1859, where all the correspondence between the donor and the recipient 

may be found. 



Thomas Nesmith Fund 
$1,000.00 Annual Interest, $60.00 

Resolution, numbered 54, passed by the City Council, April, 1870 : "That 
the City of Lowell be appointed trustee of the sum of $1,000.00, and 
the City Treasurer is authorized to pay to the High Street Church the 
interest of said sum at the rate of 6 per cent, forever. Said sum to be 
used by the Pastor and Deacons of said Church to sustain the Sunday 
School and its library for the moral and religious instruction of the 
children." Not a trust fund. 



172 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



STATISTICS ON BRIDGES CROSSING THE MERRIMACK 
RIVER AT LOWELL 



Pawtucket Bridge, 1782 

Year 1782, the Merrimack River Bridge, built of wood at Pawtucket Falls, 

costing $8,000.00. 
Year 1804, Pawtucket Falls Bridge rebuilt with stone abutments, costing 

$14,000.00. 
Year 1871-2, Pawtucket Falls Bridge rebuilt with iron and stone abutments, 

costing $40,135.66, by Blodgett & Curry. Of this amount $18,000.00 

was paid by the Town of Dracut. 



Other Bridges on the Merrimack River 

Centralville Bridge, burned August 5, 1882, was rebuilt by The Morse 
Bridge Co. in 1882-3, at a cost of $118,265.92. 

Aiken Street Bridge, built by the Cunningham Metal Co. in 1882-3, cost- 
ing $171,635.00. 

Moody Street Bridge, built by the Groton Bridge Co. in 1895-6, costing 
$88,698.90. 

Pawtucket Falls Bridge, 1916-7-8 

Loan June 1, 1916 $125,000.00 

Received from Bay State Railway Co 5,000.00 

Loan 1917 24,000.00 

Total Appropriated $1 54,000.00 

Expended — 

National Engineering Co $134,542.84 

Mr. Denman 1,600.00 

G. F. Swain 850.00 

J. R. Worcester Co 3,005.16 

Engineers' Dept 5,331.20 

Okonite Cable Co 121.50 

Laying Fire Cable 1,624.09 

Laying Water Pipe 6,451.56 

Advertising, Hardware, etc 473.65 

$154,000.00 
$2,500.00 paid National Engineering Co. in May, 1917 — final payment. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 173 



NEW HIGH SCHOOL ACTS 1915 

Dr. Cr. 

1915 October 9, Loan $125,000.00 

1916 February 29, Loan 100,000.00 

1917 April 3, Loan 75,000.00 

Sale Buildings, Receipts 4,542.50 



$304,542.50 



1915 Expenses $ 11,002.44 

1916 Expenses 199,676.07 

1917 Expenses 16,936.16 

1918 Expenses 49,014.43 

$276,629.10 



Balance January 1, 1919 $ 27,913.40 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENSES 

Paid for 

Land $181,414.16 

Advertising 203.52 

Auctioneer 338.85 

Engineering 461.60 

Titles and Recording 1,038.95 

Labor and Services 3,421.79 

Architects 13,208.33 

Steel 73,016.97 

Teaming, Hardware, etc 3,524.93 

Total $276,629.10 



174 AUDITOR'S REPORT 



CARDINAL O'CONNELL PARKWAY 

Loan 1915— Extension Dummer St $71,000.00 

Receipts — Sale of Buildings Dummer St., 1916 577.50 

Appropriation 1917 473.91 

Appropriation 1918 — Cardinal O'Connell Parkway 650.00 



Expenditures 

Labor $ 1,139.00 

Examining Titles 393.00 

Land and Buildings 59,641.98 

Advertising 7.35 

Auctioneering 69.85 

Shrubs 63.00 

Services 175.00 

Transfers 10,424.63 

All Other 790.70 



$72,701.41 



$72,701.41 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 175 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL 
Land, Buildings. Equipment, Etc. 

Dr. Cr. 

1915 Appropriation $ 4,977.00 

1916 Loan 50,000.00 

1917 Loan 75,000.00 

Loan 100,000.00 

Loans 24,000.00 

1918 Receipt .95 



$253,977.95 



1915 Expenses $ 183.81 

1916 Expenses 9,135.32 

1917 Expenses 148,069.45 

1918 Expenses 92,426.71 



$249,816.29 



Balance January 1, 1919 $ 4,161.66 



Classification of Expenses 
Paid for 

Advertising $ 84.35 

Architect 12,550.00 

Contracts 205,863.98 

Kitchen Equipment 14,700.00 

Land 4,793.19 

Laundry : 6,600.00 

Meter and Fittings 223.44 

Transfers 4,723.85 

Miscellaneous 277.48 



$249,816.29 



REPORT OF AN AUDIT 



OF THE 



ACCOUNTS 



FOR THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1918 

MADE BY 

EVERETT E. TARBOX 

CERTIFIED MUNICIAL ACCOUNTANT 



178 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

EVERETT E. TARBOX 
Expert Municipal Accountant 

101 Tremont St. Telephone 

Room 410 Main 2365. 

Boston, Mass. 

Hon. James E. Donnelly, 

Commissioner of Finance, 

of the City of Lowell. 

Sir : — 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an examination of 
the books, and an audit of the accounts of the City of Lowell, for the 
fiscal year ending December 31st, 1918, as required by the provisions of 
Section 35 of the City Charter, adopted November 7th, 1911. 

The financial records of every City Department were examined, 
checked and verified, and compared with the books of the City Auditor, 
and a proof obtained of the entire cash receipts and disbursements of the 
City Treasurer's office during the fiscal year of 1918, as recorded on his 
cash books. 

All bills for services rendered or materials furnished by any depart- 
ment were listed and checked to the departmental records, and collections 
were checked with the records of the City Treasurer's office. The differ- 
ence between these two amounts, was proved by listing the unpaid bills 
and balancing the accounts and comparing same with the accounts kept 
by the City Auditor. 

Outstanding taxes were listed and the total of each levy compared 
with the balances as shown on the books of the Auditor. 

By this method, an absolute proof is obtained that all money due the 
City has been properly accounted for, and all clerical errors found and 
corrected. A successful audit must accomplish these results. 

This very satisfactory condition is rendered possible, owing to the 
double entry system of accounting installed in the City Auditor's office, 
together with its automatic checks on the finances of all other City De- 
partments. 

The City Auditor's Ledgers are debited with all money due the City, 
and the City Treasurer, who is also Collector of all City Revenues, must 
show that all of these accounts are collected, with the exception of the 
detailed outstanding accounts, at the time of the annual audit. 

The balance as shown on the Auditor's Ledgers, combined with the 
total list of unpaid accounts, either departmental, or general taxes, must 
therefore equal the total accounts due to the City from all sources. 

If these totals do not agree, the fact is automatically established 
that an error has occurred, which must be corrected. 

The books and accounts of the City of Lowell, are in excellent con- 
dition and may be readily verified by an accountant who is experienced in 
Municipal procedure. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 179 

The City Treasurer makes no payments of cash without the authority 
of a Treasury Warrant issued by the City Auditor, and therefore all 
Warrants issued during the year 1918, were checked in detail to the bills 
and accounts in the office of the Auditor. 

These detailed accounts were listed and added, and the total found 
to agree with the total cash payments of the City Treasurer for the 
entire year. 

A summary of the financial transactions of the various departments 
covering the operations for the entire fiscal year of 1918, as examined 
and proved, is herewith presented, including trust funds and sinking 
funds. 

A balance sheet, made from audited figures, is appended to this re- 
port, showing the financial condition of the City on December 31st, 1918, 
including both its revenue and non-revenue assets and liabilities. 

Municipal Council: — Appropriations, transfers of appropriations, 
and loans authorized during the year 1918 were listed from the City 
Clerk's records of orders and resolutions passed; and checked to the 
Auditor's Journal and General Ledger; and were found to have been 
correctly entered. 

Loans authorized during the year were as follows : 

Date Purpose Amount 

February 20— -Sewer Construction $36,000.00 

March 26— Paving Streets 50,000.00 

May 9— Macadamizing 25,000.00 

May 9— Sidewalk Construction 25,000.00 

September 9 — Sewer Construction 25,000.00 

October 21— Influenza Epidemic 15,000.00 

October 26 — Soldiers and Sailors Dependents 15,000.00 

November 9 — Sewer Construction 6,000.00 

Total Authorization $177,000.00 

These loans were all negotiated during the year, and an examination 
of the Treasurer's cash book showed that they had been properly entered 
and accounted for as authorized. 

During the previous year of 1917, authorized loans amounted to 
$753,000.00, and as two loans were negotiated which were authorized dur- 
ing the year of 1916, amounting to $27,000.00, the total amount of bonds 
issued by the City during 1917 was $780,000.00. 
The comparison is interesting. 

The following table exhibits a summary of the total appropriations 
from revenue, ordered by the Council during the year. 

Annual Budget Appropriations $2,520,957.54 

Additional Appropriations, as follows : 

Auditing City Books 1,000.00 

District Police, Special Work 13,000.00 

Claims 3,000.00 



180 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Mann School 2,075.28 

Schools 327.88 

Cardinal O'Connell Park 650.00 

Entertaining Soldiers 1,000.00 

Streets 15,000.00 

Fire 18,300.00 

Police 19,700.00 

Schools 31,600.00 

Buildings 8,000.00 

Charity 10,000.00 

Health 8,000.00 

Treasurer 460.0# 

Supply 200.00 

City Clerk 160.00 

Assessors 50.00 

•Elections 130.00 

Parks " 1,000.00 

Claims 1,000.00 

Buildings 900.00 

Schools 20,000.00 

Textile School 10,000.00 

City Hall Boilers 15,000.00 

Street Maintenance 10,000.00 

Charity 5,000.00 

Streets 6,000.00 

Claims 4,915.47 

Total Revenue Appropriations '. $2,727,426.17 

State and County Assessments : 

State Tax $211,860.00 

County Tax 104,993.10 

Highway Tax 2,631.31 

Grade Crossings 4,480.00 

Non-Resident Bank Tax 11,890.48 

Total Assessments $ 335,854.89 

Total Revenue Appropriations and Assessments $3,063,281.06 

Mayor's Department. — The only receipts for which the Mayor's 
Office is directly responsible, are for the issuance of licenses for Sunday 
amusements. The records of the office showed that licenses were issued 
during the year amounting to $3,162.00, and the Treasurer's cash book ex- 
hibited a record that this amount was received and duly reported to the 
City Auditor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 181 

Auditor's Department: — The books and accounts kept by the City- 
Auditor during the year 1918, were examined, checked, added and verified. 

The accounts were in excellent condition and readily proved. 

1 hese books are a check on and a proof of the financial transactions 
of all other City departments including the Treasurer's office, and there- 
fore, the records of all departments were verified by comparison with them 
and the Treasurer's cash account. 

Pay-rolls and bills approved for payment by the Committee on Ac- 
counts were duly checked and compared with the books of the City 
Auditor. 

The Appropriation Ledger was checked in detail, and the total trans- 
actions of every account were listed, showing appropriations, receipts 
credited to appropriations, transfer credits and debits, both municipal and 
departmental ; payments of cash, and the appropriation balances of each 
account at the end of the fiscal year. 

By this method a proof was obtained that the orders of the Municipal 
Council had been carried out, and that no money had been disbursed ex- 
cept such as had been duly authorized by the Council. 

The Treasurer's payments were found to be in agreement with these 
records, and this ledger was proved to be correct by the controlling ac- 
count in the General Ledger. 

The General Ledger was examined and checked in detail, and a trial 
balance drawn off, which was found to be correct. 

The Accounts Receivable Ledger, showing the details of all depart- 
mental accounts receivable, was examined and verified, and the outstand- 
ing accounts found to agree with the controlling account for same, in the 
General Ledger. 

The outstanding accounts of every department were listed, and recon- 
ciled to the accounts as shown in the Auditor's Accounts Receivable 
Ledger. 

The following table shows a classified summary of the total cash re- 
ceipts, and the total revenue and non-revenue payments made by the 
Treasurer's office during the year, as revealed by the examination of the 
records of all departments, checked to the City Auditor's books. 

The addition to these totals of the cash on hand at the beginning and 
end of the year, reveals a proof of the total transactions of the Treasurer's 
office, and his cash balance on January 1st, 1919. 



182 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



CITY OF LOWELL 
Summary of Cash Receipts and Payments, 1918. 



Receipts 

Taxes 

Licenses and Permits 

Fines and Forfeits .... 

Grants and Gifts 

Special Assessments .. 

General Government .. 

Protection of Persons 
and Property 

Health & Sanitation .. 

Highways 

Charities 

Soldiers' Benefits 

Education 

Recreation and Un- 
classified 

Public Service Enter- 
prises 

Cemeteries 

Debt and Interest 

Agency and Trust 

Refunds 

Error in reporting 
Water receipts of 
July 3rd 



$2,680,759.13 

157,088.00 

10,241.18 

3,822.88 

48,480.61 

3,224.75 

1,859.76 
7,334.43 
2,781.25 
7,785.30 
54,273.47 
34,627.03 

6,438.93 

301,217.32 

15,729.23 

2,215,521.66 

13,065.35 

2,062.47 



.09 



Payments 
Revenue Appropria- 
tions $3,536,842.14 

Non-Revenue Appro- 
priations 416,691.17 

Temporary Tax Loans 1,750,000.00 

Trust Funds 9,225.00 

Tax Titles 2,978.99 



Total Receipts $5,566,318.84 

Cash on hand Ian. 
1st, 1918 389,792.57 



Total Payments .. 

Cash on hand Dec. 

31st, 1918 



$5,715,737.30 
240,374.11 



$5,956,111.41 



$5\956.111.41 



Treasurer's and Collector's Department : — The books and accounts 
kept by this office were checked and verified by comparison with the 
records of all other departments including the books of the City Auditor. 

Cash receipts were proved and verified by checking the cash records 
in detail, and comparing same with all other departmental records, in- 
cluding both receipts collected by the Treasurer in payment of accounts 
receivable and also collections made by other departments, directly, and 
for which no bills were sent out. 

This department is now administered in a thoroughly efficient manner, 
and all citizens are assured of businesslike treatment. The books and 
accounts were found to have been kept in a systematic manner, and were 
in excellent condition and easily proved. 

The immense amount of detail in the work done by this office, requires 
careful and prompt treatment, and automatic checks have been established 
on all departmental accounts, so that any clerical errors that might occur 
may be traced to their source immediately and corrected. 

All receipts and payments of cash, without exception, are entered 
immediately in the general cash book, and the cash is balanced daily, and 
proved. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 183 

The cash on hand in the Treasurer's office was personally counted on 
March 3rd, 1919, and a reconciliation effected back to January 1st, 1919, 
as follows : 

Cash in Drawer $ 7,059.58 

Cash in Safe 7,994.42 

Cash in Banks (per cash book) : 

Lowell Trust Co $46,807.40 

Union National Bank 50,364.56 

Old Lowell National Bank 46,969.69 

Middlesex Trust Co 48,078.81 

Appleton National Bank 47,071.50 

Wamesit National Bank 29,092.42 

First National Bank of Boston 215.35 

Total Cash in Banks $268,599.73 

Total Cash Balance on hand March 3rd, 1919 $283,653.73 

RECONCILIATION 

Cash on hand, January 1st, 1919 $240,374.11 

Receipts : 

Month of January 171,321.51 

Month of February 333,246.84 

March 1st to 3rd 5,458.59 

Payments : 

Month of January $185,739.07 

Month of February ; 281,008.25 

Cash on hand, as counted March 3rd, 1919 .... 283,653.73 



$750,401.05 $750,401.05 

PROOF OF BANK BALANCES 
March 1st, 1919 

r-. .. Bank Treasurer's Outstanding _ \ 

De P° sltor y Statement Office Checks re ^ rted 

Lowell Trust Co $47,211.73 $46,914.90 $ 296.83 

Union National Bank 51,984.00 50,364.56 1,619.44 

Old Lowell National Bank .... 47,984.57 46,969.69 1,014.88 

Middlesex Trust Co 55,718.98 48,078.81 7,640.17 

Appleton National Bank 47,071.50 47,071.50 

Wamesit National Bank 30,590.65 29,092.42 1,498.23 

First National Bank 215.35 193.76 $21.59 



$280,776.78 $268,685.64 $12,069.55 $21.59 
12,069.55 Outstanding Checks 
21.59 Interest Credited 

In March 

$280,776.78 $280,776.78 



184 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

RECONCILIATION OF BANK ACCOUNTS 
March 1st to March 3rd 

n P nn«,>nrv Bank Balance Deposits Checks Drawn Treas. Bal. 

uepobiiory March ist. March 1 to 3 March 1 to 3 March 3 

Lowell Trust Co $ 46,914.90 $107.50 $ 46,807.40 

Union National Bank 50,364.56 50,364.56 

Old Lowell National Bank .... 46,969.69 46,969.69 

Middlesex Trust Co 48,078.81 48,078.81 

Appleton National Bank 47,071.50 47,071.50 

Wamesit National Bank 29,092.42 29,092.42 

First National Bank 193.76 $21.59 215.35 

$268,685.64 $21.59 $107.50 $268,599.73 



21.59 107.50 



$268.707 23 $268,707.23 

The following table shows the entire receipts and disbursements of 

the Treasurer's office during the year, by months, and the total amounts 

added to the cash on hand at the beginning and end of the year, show 
that the balances were correct. 

Month Receipts Disbursements 

January $ 126,097.76 $ 333,899.50 

February 461,593.12 285,453.41 

March 115,442.82 267,361.85 

April 783,591.16 638,440.13 

May 80,595.67 329,775.17 

June 503,523.76 269,545.05 

July 126,410.34 336,466.39 

August 676,882.43 483,588.42 

September 72,047.03 224,152.65 

October 1.741,163.94 951.329.80 

November 548,251.97 845,022.56 

December 330,718.84 750,702.37 



Totals $5,566,318.84 $5,715,737,30 

Cash on hand 389,792.57 240,374.11 

$5,956,111.41 $5,956,111.41 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 185 

The following tables show a summary of the transactions for the 
year on account of taxes, street sprinkling, moth, sewer and sidewalk 
assessments, including cash receipts, abatements, and the uncollected 
accounts on December 31st, 1918, and a proof of same. 

Outstanding" taxes, including moth and street sprinkling assessments, 
were verified, by mailing notices to a representative list of delinquent tax- 
payers asking for a verification of .their accounts. 

All replies received from these notices proved to agree with the ac- 
counts as shown by the tax books. 

TAXES 1911 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 

Cancelled by vote of Municipal Council, Dec. 11, 

1918 " 

TAXES 1914 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 
Collections Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 

MOTH 1914 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 
Abated, May 31, 1918 (per Assessor's Records) 

STREET SPRINKLING 1914 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 18.56 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 1.32 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 17.24 



$ 


434.00 




434.00 


$ 


285.60 




285.60 


$ 


.15 




.15 



$ 18.56 $ 18.56 

TAXES 1915 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 14.412.96 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 390.40 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 12,952.92 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1919 (per detailed list) 1,069.64 



$ 14,412.96 $ 14,412.96 

MOTH 1915 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 1.25 

No Collections or Abatements 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 1.75 

Less overpayment No. 26788 .50 

$ 1.25 $ 1.25 



186 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

STREET SPRINKLING 1915 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 15.87 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 1.32 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 14.55 

$ 15.87 $ 15.87 

Proof 

Uncollected, March 7, 1919 (per detailed list) .... $ 14.60 

Less undetected error .05 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1919 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 14.55 

TAXES 1916 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $210,654.08 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $186,025.78 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 541.64 

$186,567.42 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 24,086.66 

Proof 

Uncollected, Mar. 7, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 24,072.11 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Mar. 7, 1919 33.20 

$ 24,105.31 

Less overpayments $ 6.65 

Less undetected error 12.00 18.65 

$ 24,086.66 

MOTH 1916 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 457.27 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 „ $ 457.22 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 .25 

457.47 

Overpayment, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ .20 

Proof 

Overpayment Dec. 31, 1918 $ .35 

Less outstanding account Dec. 31, 1918 .15 

$ .20 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 187 

STREET SPRINKLING 1916 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 3,641.23 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 3,63777 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (pei Auditor's Ledger) $ 3.46 

Proof 

Uncollected, Mar. 7, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 2.48 

Undetected error 1.00 

$ 3.48 

Less overpayment .02 

$ 3.46 

TAXES 1917 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $539,895.01 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $331,004.40 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 3,732.77 

^334,737.17 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $205,157.84 

Proof 

Uncollected, Mar. 3, 1919 (per detailed list) $178,216.15 

Collections, Jan. 1 to March 3, 1919 26,925.58 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to March 3, 1919 61.40 

$205,203.13 

Less overpayments '.. $12.02 

Less undetected error : 33.27 

45.29 

$205,157.84 

MOTH 1917 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 775.32 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 411.77 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 363.55 

Proof 

Uncollected, Mar. 13, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 345.97 

$ 365.20 

Less overpayment $ .15 

Less undetected error 1.50 

$ 1.65 

$ 363.55 



188 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

STREET SPRINKLING 1917 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 7,226.69 

Re-assessment 1.88 

$ 7,228.57 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 4,069.34 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 3.06 

$ 4,072.40 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 3,156.17 

Proof 

Uncollected, Mar. 3, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 2,714.83 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Mar. 3, 1919 441.34 

$ 3,156.17 

TAXES 1918 

Commitment (per Auditor's Ledger) $2,418,009.91 

Supplementary Commitment 5,035.75 

$2,423,045.66 

Collections to Dec. 31, 1918 $1,873,091.13 

Abatements to Dec. 31, 1918 6,296.27 

$1,879,387.40 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 543,658.26 

Proof 

Uncollected, April 1, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 393,088.30 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 1919 147,679.72 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 1919 2,905.42 

Undetected error .82 

$ 543,674.26 
Less overpayments as follows : 

Page 278, Line 45 $2.00 

Page 329, Line 15 2.00 

Page 517, Line 37 2.00 

Page 522, Line 13 2.00 

Page 560, Line 22 2.00 

Page 586, Line 7 2.00 

Page 586, Line 40 2.00 

Page 55, Line 7 2.00 

$ 16.00 

$ 543,658.26 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 189 

MOTH 1918 

Committment (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 2,768.70 

Collections to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 1,806.60 

Abatements to Dec. 31, 1918 11.60 

1,818.20 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 950.50 

Proof 

Uncollected, April 1, 1919 (per detailed list) .. $ 767.60 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 1919 181.40 

$ 949.00 

Undetected error 1.50 

$ 950.50 

STREET SPRINKLING 1918 

Commitment (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 25,612.22 

Re-assessment after payment 1.95 

$ 25,614.17 
Collections to Dec. 31, 1918 18,226.13 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) . $ 7,388.04 

Proof 

Uncollected April 1, 1919 (per detailed list) .. $ 5,896.83 
Collections, Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 1919 1,491.61 

$ 7,388.44 

Less overpayment $ .04 

Less undetected error 36 

$ .40 

$ 7,388.04 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 8,100.69 

Commitments, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 15,139.91 

$ 23,240.60 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 13,845.74 

$ 13,878.89 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 9,361.71 



190 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Proof 

Uncollected, April 11, 1919 (per detailed list) $ 6,134.05 

Collections, January 1 to April 11, 1919 3,227.66 

$ 9,361.71 

SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 4,373.26 

Commitments, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 3,643.57 

$ 8,016.83 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 6,023.40 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 30.10 

6,053.50 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's 

Ledger) $ 1,963.33 

Proof 

Uncollected, April 11,1919 (per detailed list) $ 1,111.69 

Collections, Jan. 1 to April 11, 1919 851.64 

$ 1,963.33 

Assessors' Department: — The records of the Assessors' office re- 
lating to the commitment of taxes and special assessments and the abate- 
ment of same, were examined, checked, added and verified, and found to 
be in excellent condition and correct. 

Abatements as reported to the City Auditor were found to agree with 
the amounts credited by the Tax Collector to the various accounts on the 
Tax Commitment Books, as summarized in the foregoing tables of taxes 
and special assessments. 

License Commissioner's Department: — The City Treasurer received 
during the year, fees for licenses and permits to an amount of $10,190.50, 
excluding the fees for liquor licenses. Of this amount $6,929.00 was re- 
ceived from the License Commissioners' office. A portion of this amount, 
or $360.50 was received by the License Commissioners' office during the 
year 1917, but was not deposited with the City Treasurer until January, 
1918. Therefore, the following classification includes this amount as a 
receipt of the year 1918. 

The following tables show a detailed summary of the amount of cash 
received during the year by the City Treasurer for licenses issued by this 
office : — 

Liquor Licenses 

62 First Class Common Victuallers @ $1,300.00 $ 80,600.00 

31 Fourth Class Common Victuallers @ 1,300.00 40,300.00 

1 Brewery @ 2,000.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 191 

11 Innholders @ 1,800.00 19,800.00 

7 Clubs @ 300.00 2,100.00 

2 Paints and Chemicals (g 1.00 2.00 

34 Druggists 1.00 34.00 



Total amount paid Treasurer $144,836.00 

Other Licenses 

Classification Number Issued Amount 

Amusement 47 $1,358.00 

Auctioneers 33 66.00 

Common Victuallers 159 795.00 

Express and Job Wagon 149 149.00 

Intelligence Offices 13 26.00 

Pool and Billiards 60 478.00 

Second Hand Clothing 13 26.00 

Sunday Sale of Ice Cream 329 1,645.00 

Special Chauffeurs 61 61.00 

Coffee Houses 38 190.00 

Motor Bus Seals 17 8.50 

Hawkers and Peddlers, First Class 32 731.00 

Hawkers and Peddlers, Second Class 9 33.00 

Itinerant Musicians 11 14.00 

Motor Bus 22 220.00 

Innholders 11 55.00 

Junk Collectors 82 164.00 

Junk Collectors' Badges 9 4.50 

Junk Dealers 16 160.00 

Recording Liquor Licenses 151 151.00 

To Take and Sell Pictures „ 17 17.00 

Bowling Alleys 22 205.00 

Pawnbrokers 4 200.00 

Old Gold and Silver 4 8.00 

Bicycles 1 2.00 

Burlap Bags 3 6.00 

Shoes and Old Bottles 8 16.00 

Ice Cream and Pop Corn 6 6.00 

Fourth of July 98 136.00 



$6,931.00 
Less error in payment to Treasurer May 6, 1918 2.00 



$6,929.00 



This error was corrected March 25, 1919. 



192 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

City Clerk's Department: — The financial records of this office were 
listed and checked to the records of the Auditor and Treasurer and found 
to be in agreement. 

The following table shows a summary of the receipts of the depart- 
ment, during the year, and the source of same : — 

Permits : 

Marriage 1,177.00 $1,177.00 

Licenses : 

Gasoline 112.00 

Lunch Wagon 100.00 

Gunpowder 2.00 

Fire Arms 30.00 

Sausage 1.00 

Vendor 10.00 

255.00 
Services rendered : 

Recording Mortgages $ 259.26 

Assignment of Wages 9.00 

Married Women's Certificate 5.50 

Miscellaneous 575.62 

849.38 

$2,281.38 

Engineering Department: — The records of the department relating 
to special assessments, were examined and verified by comparison with the 
books and accounts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

These records consist of the commitment of Sewer and Sidewalk 
Assessments, and the proof of the correctness of these accounts are 
shown under the head of Treasurer's and Collector's department. 

Building Department: — The financial records of this office were 
examined, checked and verified by comparison with the books of the City 
Auditor and Treasurer. 

The following tables show a proof of the correctness of the accounts 
of the department, including the bills receivable, and a classification of 
the receipts on account of same. These receipts were paid direct to the 
City Treasurer. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 91.00 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 4,970.45 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $4,974.75 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 1.20 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 85.50 

$5,061.45 $5,061.45 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 193 

Classification of Receipts 

School House Rents $1,005.00 

Court House Rents 2,950.00 

Sale of Old Boilers from City Hall 310.00 

Sale of Old Bartlett School House 380.00 

Miscellaneous Sales 329.75 



$4,974.75 

In addition to the collections made by the Treasurer, the depart- 
ment also makes collections direct, and deposits same with Treasurer, 
monthly. These receipts were checked and verified, and during the year 
were found to be as follows : — 

Elevator Operator's Licences $ 35.50 

Telephone Toll Re-imbursement .68 

Public Comfort Station 663.00 



$699.18 

Police Department: — The receipts of this department are small, con- 
sisting almost entirely of bills sent to neighboring Towns for the board 
of prisoners at the City Jail. The amount of bills sent out during the 
year was $55.75 in comparison with an amount of $566.93 sent out during 
the previous year, which would indicate that there was a great decrease 
in the number of prisoners cared for during the year 1918. 

The following table shows a proof of the correctness of the accounts 
of the department. 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 5.08 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 55.75 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $52.00 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 50 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 8.33 



$60.83 $60.83 
Cash receipts collected direct by department, and sub- 
sequently deposited with Treasurer 23.72 

Fire Department: — The records of the Fire Department were 
checked and verified by comparison with the accounts of the City Auditor 
and Treasurer. The following table shows a proof of the Accounts 
Receivable. 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ .45 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 81.61 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $81.61 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 45 



$82.06 $82.06 



194 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Wire Department: — The departmental records showed bills sent out 
during the year amounting to $432.47 and collections of the same amount, 
which amount was proved by the books of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

There are no uncollected bills in this department, as all accounts sent 
out are paid promptly. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: — The financial records of this de- 
partment were examined, checked and verified by comparison with the 
books of the Auditor and Treasurer. The accounts were, as usual, in ex- 
cellent condition, and readily proved. The following tables show a 
proof of the accounts receivable and also of the amount of cash collected 
by the Sealer, direct and deposited with Treasurer. 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 52.62 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 358.28 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $356.84 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 1.24 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 52.82 

$410.90 $410.90 
Cash collections of Sealer, deposited with Treasurer - $838.07 

Milk Inspector: — The financial records of this office were examined 
and checked, by comparison with the records of the Auditor and 
Treasurer. 

Licenses issued were as follows : 

Milk Licenses $225.00 

Oleo Licenses 22.50 

Total issued $247.50 

Paid Treasurer $244.50 

Amount due Treasurer $ 3.00 

The amount due Treasurer was caused by an error in addition, and 
will be deposited with Treasurer at once. 

Health Department: — The financial records of this department were 
examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the accounts 
of the Auditor and Treasurer. 

This department is charged with the collection of Garbage and re- 
ceives much cash for the sale of same at the Health Yard. The depart- 
ment also issues licenses for the collection of Garbage, to citizens. 

All receipts of cash made by the department are deposited with 
Treasurer, daily. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 195 

The following tabic shows a summary of the total cash received by 
the department during the year, and duly deposited with the City 
Treasurer. 

Sale of Garbage $3,822.24 

Garbage Licenses 550.00 

Board at Influenza Hospital 378.05 

Sale of Platinum 19.01 

Sale of Horse 325.00 

Total Receipts for 1918 $5,094.30 

The Accounts Receivable of the Department were examined, the out- 
standing accounts listed and proved as per the following table : — 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $1,404.32 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 2,379.62 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $2,127.13 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 263.60 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 1,393.21 

$3,783.94 $3,783.94 

These receipts were received from the following parties : 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $2,008.56 

City of Boston 8.57 

Town of Arlington 110.00 

Total $2,127.13 



Street Department: — The financial records of this department were 
examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the accounts 
of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

The departmental accounts receivable ledger was found to be in good 
condition, and in balance with the Auditor's ledger, and the receipts were 
easily proved. 

The uncollected accounts receivable were listed, and the collections 
proved, as follows : — 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) . $1,218.51 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 2,244.51 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $1,017.33 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) 2,445.69 

$3,463.02 $3,463.02 



196 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

The receipts of the department were classified as follows:— 

Street Maintenance $593.26 

Sewer Maintenance 34.73 

Sewer Connections 380.66 

Paving 8.68 

Total $1,017.33 

As this department now has a good system of accounting, it would be 
well to have a monthly report of expenditures published in connection 
with the monthly report of the Finance Department. 

Charity Department — Hospital: — The financial records of this de- 
partment were examined and verified by comparison with the accounts of 
the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

The following table shows a summary of the bills sent out during the 
year and the collections on account of same, together with the uncollected 
accounts at the end of the year. 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 39.27 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 2,657.77 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $2,382.48 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 313.56 

Error in bill No. 9253, reported too large to Auditor 1.00 

$2,697.04 $2,697.04 

Charity Department — Outdoor Relief:' — The financial records of 
this department were examined and verified by comparison with the ac- 
counts of the City Auditor and Treasurer, and were found to be in ex- 
cellent condition. 

The following table shows a proof of the accounts receivable and the 
collections on account of same : — 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 4,562.62 

Committed, Jan. 1, 1918 to Dec. 31, 1918 6,228.59 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $ 5,402.82 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 328.38 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 5,060.01 

$10,791.21 $10,791.21 

School Department: — The financial records of the School Depart- 
ment were examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the 
accounts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 






AUDITOR'S REPORT 197 

The accounts receivable were proved by listing the uncollected ac- 
counts at the end of the year and effecting a reconciliation with the 
Auditor's Ledger, as follows : — 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 4,940.46 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 , 7,560.13 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $10,330.89 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 46.93 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 2,122.77 



$12,500.59 $12,500.59 



The total receipts for the year were classified as follows : — 

Tuition of State Wards $1,926.00 

Tuition from Towns and Individuals 8,393.75 

Re-imbursement for express charges paid 4.14 

Sale of Newsboys' Badges . 7.00 



$10,330.89 

School Department — Vocational: — The financial records of the 
Vocational School were examined checked, added and verified by compari- 
son with the accounts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

The following table shows a proof of the accounts receivable and the 
collections on account of same, together with the outstanding accounts at 
the end of the year. 

Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) .... $ 445.55 

Committed, Jan. 1 to December 31, 1918 $34,036.46 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $19,890.10 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 19.51 

Uncollected, December 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 14,572.40 



$34,482.01 $34,482.01 

The large amount of uncollected accounts at the end of the year is 
accounted for, by the fact that there was due $14,240.65 from the State 
of Massachusetts, Board of Education, which was outstanding at that time. 

Library Department: — The financial records of the Library were 
examined, checked, added and verified. 

The total receipts of the department for Fines was $429.69, and this 
amount was duly deposited with the City Treasurer and reported to the 
Auditor. 

Park Department: — The financial records of the Park Department 
were examined, and verified by comparison with the accounts of the City 
Auditor and Treasurer. 



198 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

The receipts of the department were listed and summarized as fol- 
lows : 

Rent of Land on North Common $1,463.50 

Special Moth Work 75.05 

Total Receipts $1,538.55 

There were no uncollected accounts, and all cash collections were paid 
to the Treasurer, as soon as collected. 

Water Department: — The financial records of the Water Depart- 
ment were examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the 
accounts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

The accounts receivable were proved by listing the uncollected water 
bills due the department at the end of the year and effecting a reconcilia- 
tion with the total amount of bills sent out, and the collections paid to 
the City Treasurer during the year. 

The clerical work of the department is excellent, and the accounts 
are always in such a condition, that they can be easily proven. 

The following tables show the proof of the accounts receivable, in- 
cluding the uncollected accounts at the beginning of the fiscal year, the 
commitments, collections, abatements and discounts made during the year, 
and the uncollected accounts at the end of the year, as proved by the list 
of uncollected accounts drawn off as of that time. 
Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) .... $ 1,453.41 

Committed, Jan. 1, 1918 to Dec. 31, 1918 335,351.20 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $301,136.72 

Discounts, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 29,870.40 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 2,504.26 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 3,293.23 



$336,804.61 $336,804.61 

The total cash receipts of the department during the year, as proved 
above constitute the entire income of the department for maintenance 
purposes, and were classified as from the following sources : — 

Water Rates, Annual $ 12,013.45 

Water Rates, Metered 268,934.05 

Maintenance 10,101.09 

Construction 4,335.81 

Sale of Cast Iron Pipe, 198356 lbs. @ $58 5,752.32 

Total Income $301,136.72 

The total receipts of the department during the vear 1917 were 
$272,065.81 and these were increased during the year 1918 to $301,136.72, 
but the expenses of the department during the year 1918 were still much 
in excess of its income. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 199 

The following table summarizes the total income and expenses of the 
department for the fiscal year : — 

Income 

Collections from all sources $301,136.72 

Transfer from Street Watering Appropriation .... 2,800.00 

Transfer from Water Filtration Appropriation 2,308.80 

Expenses 

Pay Rolls paid $136,791.74 

Bills paid 106,508.23 

Transfers for departmental services 447.09 

Transfer for payment of debt (vote of Alunicipal 

Council) 5,352.32 

Maturing Debt, charged off 47,000.00 

Interest on Indebtedness matured 56,025.00 

$352,124.38 $306,245.52 
If the department would discontinue the custom of giving discounts 
for cash payments of water rates, its income should be sufficient to defray 
its expenses. 

Public Scales: — The financial records of this department consist of 
a cash book, in which is recorded the details of all receipts. This book 
was examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the ac- 
counts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. 

The total receipts were $80.50, but the amount paid to the Treasurer 
was $80.60 due to an error in addition. The payment to Treasurer on 
December 6th 1918, was too large by ten cents. 

Cemetery Department: — The financial records of this department 
were examined, checked, added and verified by comparison with the ac- 
counts of the City Auditor and Treasurer. The clerical work of the de- 
partment is performed in an accurate manner and the accounts were 
found to be in excellent condition and easily proved. 

The department is supported entirely by its income from the sale of 
lots and graves and services, and the receipts during the fiscal year from 
these sources amounted to $15,729.23, as compared with 1917 income from 
the same sources of $11,756.05. During the same periods, the main- 
tenance expenses of the department show a decrease from $14,345.78 in 
1917 to $13,315.30 in 1918. 

Therefore during the year 1918 the department receipts were more 
than sufficient to pay all of its maintenance expenses, without touching 
any of its revenue from Perpetual Care Trust Funds. 

The accrued income from these funds during the year amounted to 
$5,595.66, and this amount added to the surplus on hand at the beginning 
of the fiscal year, gives the department a reserve fund from income on 
Perpetual Care Trust Funds, on December 31, 1918 of $24,437.96. 



200 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Cemetery Department — Concluded: — The following tables show 
the proof of the accounts receivable, and a classification of the total 
receipts of the department as credited to its income account. 
Uncollected, Jan. 1, 1918 (per Auditor's Ledger) $ 3,679.41 

Committed, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 11,142.97 

Collections, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 $10,829.73 

Abatements, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1918 13.50 

Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1918 (per detailed list) 3,979.15 



$14,822.38 $14,822.38 
In addition to the collections made by the City Treasurer, on account 
of bills sent out, as proved above, there were collections received at the 
departmental office on account of sales for which no bills were rendered, 
amounting to $4,899.50 which sum was verified by an examination of the 
departmental cash book. 

The total receipts amounting to $15,729.23. were classified as from the 
following sources : — 

Sale of Lots and Graves $ 6,478.50 

Care of Lots and Graves 5,177.98 

Opening Graves 3,950.50 

Recording and Miscellaneous 122.25 

Total Income $15,729.23 

Interest and Indebtedness: — Receipts on account of interest were 
checked, added and verified and found to total as follows : 

Interest on deferred taxes $28,699.04 

Interest on bank deposits 8,077.68 

Total receipts for Interest ^36,776.72 

The records of Loans authorized, and the receipts on accounts of 
loans issued during the year were examined and verified. The receipts 
were in accordance with the orders of the Municipal Council. 

The following table shows a summary of the total receipts from 
loans, including premiums and accrued interest on same. 

Bonds issued $ 177,000.00 

Temporary Revenue Loans 2,000,000.00 

Premiums on above loans 968.07 

Accrued Interest on above loans 776.87 



Total receipts from Indebtedness .... $2,178,744.94 

Payments on account of Interest and Debt were proven by the 
Auditor's debt record of amounts maturing during the fiscal year, and by 
an examination of the Treasurer's subsidiary cash book and special bank 
account showing the detailed payments on account of maturing debt and 
interest. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 201 

Interest and Indebtedness — Concluded: — The interest require- 
ments and debt maturing during the fiscal year were as follows : — 

Interest : 

On Temporary Loans $ 47,618.02 

On General City Debt 134,948.10 

On Water Debt 56,025.00 

Expense of Bond Issues 2,202.50 

Total interest requirements $240,793.62 

Indebtedness : 

General Maturing Debt $412,621.30 

Water Maturing Debt 47,000.00 

Total debt requirements $459,621.30 

Total Interest and Maturing Debt $700,414.92 

The following table shows a proof of this trust account, in the 
possession of the City Treasurer, for the payment of Maturing Debt and 
Interest oil same. As fast as the debt and interest becomes due the cash 
to pay same is deposited in this special fund, and held until the maturing- 
bonds and coupons are presented for payment, which sometimes is long 
after the date of maturity. 

Unpaid Debt and Interest Jan. 1, 1918 (per 

Auditor's Ledger) $ 13,665.00 

Interest and Debt requirements '(as above) 700,414.92 

Total payments during year (verified) $700,648.67 

Unpaid Debt and Interest December 31, 1918 13,431.25 



£714,079.92 $714,079.92 

The amount of unpaid debt and interest on December 31, 1918, was 
verified by examination of the bank statement of the balance to the credit 
of this account on that date. 

Sinking Funds: — The City of Lowell has loans outstanding amount- 
ing to $1,800,000.00, for the payment of which, sinking funds have been 
provided. 

The total amount of cash and securities in these funds on December. 
31, 1918, was $1,597,655.31. 

The securities of the four sinking funds, comprising the total amount 
owned by the City was personally examined and checked to a prepared 
list, and reconciled back to January 1, 1919. 

The securities belonging to these funds were found to be in excellent 
condition, systematically labeled and filed, and were therefore easily 
verified. 

All coupons not matured were found to be intact, and the securities 
checked agreed with the list furnished, and also with the books of the 
City Treasurer, who is also Treasurer of all Sinking Funds. 

The income earned by each fund was figured, and the cash transac- 
tions of the funds during the year were examined and proved. 



202 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



The following tables show the receipts and payments during the 
year, together with the cash balances at the beginning and end of the year, 
as verified by Bank statements of deposits on hand at the periods men- 
tioned : — ■ 



WATER LOAN SINKING FUND 

1918 

Cash Securities Total 



On hand at beginning of year $31,131.22 $829,621.30 $860,752.52 

On hand at end of year 1,944.56 908,450.00 910,394.56 



Receipts 

Annual Appropriation .. $ 16,000.00 

Income on Securities .. 34,178.47 

Interest on Deposits .... 236.01 
Securities matured and 

sold 27,171.30 

Discount on securities 

purchased 339.90 

Total Receipts $ 77,925.68 Total Payments $107,112.34 

Cash, Jan. 1, 1918 31,131.22 Cash, Dec. 31, 1918 1,944.56 



Payments 

Securities purchased 

(par) $106,000.00 

Premiums on above 204.00 

Accrued Interest on 

above 908.34 



$109,056.90 



$109,056.90 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



203 



HIGH SCHOOL SINKING FUND 
1918 

Cash Securities 



Total 



On hand at beginning of year $3,846.32 $129,000.00 $132,846.32 

On hand at end of year 975.57 140,500.00 141,475.57 



Receipts 

Annual Appropriation .. 
Income oil Securities .... 

Interest on deposits 

Securities sold 

Discount on securities 
purchased 



Payments 

$ 3,000.00 Securities purchased .... 

5,593.75 Premiums on above 

27.81 A.ccrued interest on 

7,000.00 above 

133.85 



$ 18,500.00 
63.50 

62.66 



Total Receipts $ 15,755.41 Total Payments $ 18,626.16 

Cash, Jan. 1, 1918 3,846.32 Cash, Dec. 31, 1918 975.57 



$ 19,601.73 



$ 19,601.73 



204 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSES SINKING FUND 
1918 

Cash Securities 



Total 



On hand at beginning of year $5,452.42 $116,000.00 $121,452.42 

On hand at end of year 141.15 130,000.00 130,141.15 



Receipts 

Annual Appropriation .. 
Income on Securities .... 

Interest on deposits 

Securities sold 

Discount on securities 
purchased 



Payments 

$ 4,000.00 Securities purchased 

4,806.25 (par) $ 19,000.00 

55.06 Premiums on above 70.30 

5,000.00 Accrued interest on 

above 208.78 

106.50 



Total Receipts $ 13,967.81 Total Payments $ 19,279.08 

Cash, Jan. 1, 1918 5,452.42 Cash, Dec. 31, 1918 141.15 



$ 19,420.23 



$ 19.420.23 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



205 



CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL BUILDING SINKING FUND 

1918 

Cash Securities Total 

On hand at beginning of year $9,734.24 $381,900.00 $391,634.24 

On hand at end of year 4,944.03 $410,700.00 415,644.03 



Receipts 

Annual Appropriation .. $ 7,500.00 

Income on Securities .... 16,420.75 

Interest on Deposits .... 63.08 

Securities Matured 5,200.00 

Discount on Securities 

purchased 365.80 



Payments 

Securities purchased 

(par) $ 34,000.00 

Premiums on above 6.40 

Accrued interest on 

above 333.44 



Total Receipts $ 29,549.63 Total Payments $ 34,339.84 

Cash, Jan. 1, 1918 9,734.24 Cash, Dec. 31, 1918 4.944.03 



$ 39,283.87 



$ 39,283.87 



206 AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Trust Funds: — The securities belonging to the several Trust Funds, 
held by the City of Lowell, were personally examined, and listed, and the 
cash transactions during the year were checked and proved. 

It is my duty to call to your attention, the fact that three of these 
funds are without securities, alhough an effort was made by you during 
the year to have this rectified. 

The following tables show the standing and value of the Trust Funds, 
for which the City has Cash and Securities, as examined and proved : — 

John Davis Library Fund 

Cash Securities Total 

On hand at beginning of year $486.02 $100,544.15 $101,030.17 

On hand at end of year 199.45 100.527.98 100,727.43 



Decrease in funds $286.57 $ 16.17 $ 302.74 

Receipts Payments 

Mortgage payment $ 25.00 To Library Trustees $3,440.35 

Income on securities 3,035.00 

Interest on deposits 11.07 

National Bank Tax 82.71 



Total receipts $3,153.78 Total payments $3,440.35 

Cash, Jan. 1, 1918 486.02 Cash, Dec. 31, 1918 199.45 



$3,639.80 $3,639.80 
The securities belonging to this fund on December 31, 1918, were ex- 
amined and found to be as follows : — 

Registered Bonds $ 84,000.00 

Railroad Stocks 8,200.00 

Industrial Stocks 2,100.00 

Bank Stocks 3,500.00 

Mortgage Notes 2,525.00 

Central Savings Bank, Book No. 35073 2Q2.98 



Total Par Value of Securities $100,527.98 

Cash in Appleton National Bank 199.45 



Total Value of Fund, December 31, 1918 $100,727.43 

Hapgood Wright Centennial Fund 

On hand January 1, 1918 $5,443.90 

Income earned during year 247.68 



On hand December 31, 1918 $5,691.58 

Securities examined, as follows : — 

City Institution for Savings, Book No. 39419 .. $4,550.05 
Lowell Institution for Savings, Book No. 54679 1,141.53 



Value of Securities, December 31, 1918 $5,691.58 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 207 

Johnathan Tyler Worthy Poor Fund 
The securities belonging to this fund, consist of Savings Bank Books, 
to a total amount, on December 31, 1918, of $10,000.00. The income earned 
during the year amounted to $400.00, and this money was distributed as 
provided for by the terms of the deed of gift. 

A list of the Securities, as examined and verified, is herewith shown: 

Middlesex Safe Deposit & Trust Co $ 4,000.00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Book No. 139598 2,000.00 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Book No. 40383 2,000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Book No. 124206 2,000.00 



$10,000.00 



Cemetery, Perpetual Care Trust Funds 

Principal Income Total 

On hand, January 1, 1918 $105,765.00 $18,842.30 $124,607.30 

Receipts during the year 1918 9,225.00 5,595.66 14,820.66 



On hand Dec. 31, 1918 (per list) $114,990.00 $24,437.96 $139,427.96 

Securities examined, and verified were as follows : — 

Middlesex Safe Deposit & Trust Co., Book No. 1755 $17,636.99 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Book No. 24823 17,168.49 

Merrimack River Savings Bank, Book No. 8765 18,716.23 

City Institution for Savings, Book No. 74283 16,277.82 

Washington Savings Bank, Book No. 1216 16,874.09 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Book No. 47514 17,879.56 

Central Savings Bank, Book No. 26100 17,579.05 

Lowell Institution for Savings, Book No. 79266 17,295.73 



Total Value of Securities, Dec. 31, 1918 139,427.96 

Conclusion: — The audit of the 1918 accounts has shown that the 
books and accounts are in a most satisfactory condition, and the clerical 
work performed by the various departments has been well done. 

Accurate information regarding" any of the Municipal accounts, is 
readily obtainable by any interested parties, at the office of the City 
Auditor and City Treasurer, and this always a test of clerical work being 
well performed. 

The appended Balance Sheet, under date of January 1, 1919, made 
from audited and proven figures, reveals the true financial condition of 
the City on that date. 

I wish to express my appreciation for the courteous treatment re- 
ceived during the course of the annual audit. All books and papers in 
every department were placed at my disposal cheerfully and promptly, 
and assistance was cheerfully given when needed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT E. TARBOX. 



o 

o 

o 

o 
o 
o~ 
o 

q 



o 

00 

no 

On 



CO 

CO 

CO 

T— I 

o 



09- 



On 

o 

CO 

lo 

t— i 

o~ 

NO 
£3- 



r^ 



r-x ^ o 

T-H T-H LO 



cm 

cq 

lo cm" ro !">«! lo 

NO lo co NO On 

i— i CO f^ CM Tf 

i_0 "nJ" 





C& 




i— 1 




C5 




i-H 


t-q 


~ 


H} 


i— ) 


W 


>> 


£ 


5h 


o 


2 


r-^1 


a3 




H» 


Ph 




o 






<D 



l— I <D 

I— ( 
03 



3 

o 
o 
o 

< 



J2 
TO 



ro 



<u 

H > 



3 O 



O 



Ph 



.5 
'u 
cu 

C CO 



u 



ro 



~ u 

CQ CO 



a & 



ro en 



ro o 
ro <u .« 



o -s .s 



<u 



K o 



>, 



CU 

o 

ro 

rj 
*5 

o 

be 



LU 

D 


c - S 

G <f< cu 


Z 


cu ^ i_ 

H Ph 


IJ 


■*r 


> 


^ 


Li! 




QC 


»— < 



<U <U 



S .S 



ro 






ro 






U U 



> 
<u 



oo 

t— i 

^9- 



O 

cm' 

cO~ 



~t NO ^1- nO 

\q vq oq f\i 

o\ vd k od 

o oo >o io 

cq o «-h q 

r-T -rf~ Iff CO" 

M O ^1- 

CM LO 
69- 



LO lO O 
CM lO lO 

r~! CO O 
NO io 

CO On 



<V> 



C 

o 
o 
o 

< 



W 
CO 

< 



c 



cu 

u • • 

ro 

a 

cu 



i^ N OO 

a On a 



^ >0 ON OO 

ro m i— i i— i i— i t— i 

ON On ON ON 



J* 



ro 

PQ 



s: r* o 



ro 
U 



ro 
H 



< 
o 



^i- o 
CO lo 



N T-H •+ 

O LO On 

°°, °„ ^ 

NO lO OC 

i— i »— i CM 



CU 

ro 



ro 



cu 
> 

o 



<: 



o 



J-i rv^ t-h 



NO K OO 
ON On On 



lO 

T-H 
CO 



CM 


n 


•*o 
cq 


o 


CM 

to 


r— 1 

VO 

CO 


CO 

VO 


o 


o 


O^ 


T— 1 


LO 



ifr 



V* 



O O 

cq cm 
<o 



^/> 



mNONrf 
LO rf ; t-h o 

tJ-° to NO OO 
T-H to 00 

t-h cq^ 

co' rC 



iB- 



m NO K OO 

T-H T-H t-H T-H 

O. On On On 



>. 




^ 


a 


NO 


c 


ft 




^, 


CU 


ON 


a 


> 

/ — > 


-(-> 


CO 


o 


CU 


cu 


C/5 
1/3 


E 


cu 


CU 






r-J 




CO 



cu 

s 

CU 

en cai 

t/1 C/3 

< 

tM 

*ro 
cu 

-a 



<u 

c^ 

c/3 

< 

cu 
cu 



X 



co co H 



00 
CO 


© 

CM 


cm" 

IN 


co 
to 


rC 


\o 



m- 



m- 



(O lo 

to as 

as t^ 

cm as 

CO CO* 



<s> 



c 

3 
O 

o 

o 

< 



JQ 

re 



73 
CO 

3 
C 
♦3 

C 

o 
O 



HI 

D 
Z 
W 

> 



-a 

CJ 

u 

*o 

CJ 

cfl 3 

I* 

o * 

< £ 

4} CD 



CD <U 



CU f/J *-* 



CO 

SO 

o" 



CO 
°\ 
CO* 






£ -a 



o 

C 
< 



U -5. 



co 



in. 

o 

SO 

-T 
Os 

lO 

oo 

o 



as 

OS 

SO 

as 
m- 



oo 

CO 

CM 
t^ 

CM 



o 

SO 
"T 

ON 
LO* 

oo 



CO 


LO CM 

^ 00 


C\J 


Os 
sO # 


»— i so 
O lo 


00 


cm' 

LO 


CO* 

as 

CO 




O CO 

so '- 1 

o_ <o 






i~ ( 


csf 


u-f. 



o lo o o 
o o o o 

NO00C 
CM l^ t^ u-> 

i^ r^ co cm 

O so* 
*— i l-O 



r^ o o 
r^ ^f u-> 

cm' r\j in 

cm t^ oo 

i— I to 
Osf "* 



(fr 



CO m 
CM i-H 

CO ON 

as t^ 

CM OS 
CO* CO* 



m- 



c 

3 
O 
o 
u 

< 



CU 
CO 
CO 

< 



PQ 

■a I 

c o 

cu '43 

3 <-> 

3 cu 

t: ~ 

£ o 

5 l - 



JK j= 



o .§ f 

Oi tin 






z: to 
t- 3* 
TO cu 






u — 



— -3 «- 
to 



cu 

en 

o 

o 

Q 

3 O 



<-3 
cu 

53 

PQ 



co „> 



F -t: -o 



.3 a; 

CO O 



^C£~ 



o 

CO 



*- o 


JO 
cu 



re .^ 3 

£ < w 

2 rt ^ i„ 

r! ■*-> 13 ,-, TO 






CO 



o rt 

TO r- 

W 



o 
o 

x: 

CJ 

CO 

*TO 
C 
O 

TO — ; 

CJ -C 

O 3 

> Oh 



bfl 



C2 



Crt 


S 


TO 




^ 


>> 




0> 


U. 




CU 


u 


TO 


s 


i= 


u 



IN. 

t— < 

o 
"1- 

00* 



m 



o 
o 

CM 
CM 



tfv 



tN 

CO 

© 
4*9- 



4) 

3 
C 

C 

o 
O 






4> 

O 

C 

n 
n 
CQ 



UJ 
D 
Z 
UJ 
> 
UJ 

cc 

z 

o 

z 



c 

a 



c 

3 
O 

o 
o 

< 

(0 
(0 

< 



r>» o © 

o o o 

O '-' o 

*r o © 
^H "**". ^ 
Tf «-T cvf 



^- 



c 




3 




O 


CO 


o 


j2 


o 


03 


< 


O 



— o 

_J u 



bfl 



15 



05 "3 3 S, 



rt ci! r 

CQ co £ 

.2 c U 

■*-• CTj , 



o 



o o 



O rt 



<D CO 

< 

CO 

ON 

lO 
CM 

oC 



c 






"O «-' '"f 

ro © © 

© ^t - ' f-J 

00 N 00 

»-< CM 



v± 



be 

CQ 






o a\ o 

r-J vo f*2 

f\i CM* 

ro O 






N ^ 

'3 CD 

T3 



1) 
V 

u 

00 
u 

U 

O 

Ch 



o 
g 



bo 



CQ 

<u 
g 



t/3 



«» CO 
bft C 

-o o 

^ CO 



c 

4) 

in 



X 



o t^ o 

t O f5 

rri cm 

,-. vo 

cm «-■ 
4/3- 



_ o 
o 
o 

-3 
u 



^^ 0,1 
U /V 

3 ^ 



00 ^ co 

ja o o 

.2 ffl o o 

y ^ *5 o 

^ ^ CO CO 

W 



GO J 

u 



LO 


.— i 


,— 1 


r^. 


■o 


vq 


lO 


<*5 


csi 


ri 


LO 


Os 


i^ 


o 


oo 


lo 


LO 


CM 


r^ 


CM 










i- 




ro 


On 



w- 



1/) (\) Tt Tf 
t THNfO 

r\i r\i «-J vd 
On lo r^ to 

M M c^ 

09 



















i 

-5 






















*0 










*o 










CO 


< 


<M 








3 










cO 


^ 


6 








p 

So 
>. 


1_ 








o 

Ih 


CO 

<U 

CO 
"»h 


r— 








03 


PS 








Oh 


Ch 

1_ 


JS 








E 


Oh 




^ 






<v 


E 








— 


'w 




pi 




03 


C3 


J-H 












<r 


Oh 




.£* 


w 


tu 








5 


0, 


1 




_u 




cS 




"D 




C73 


— 

Oh 








s 




& 




0> 


^o 


en 
u 

HO 


u 

c 

'-t- 


•- 


c 


T3 


S 


C/2 


o 

CO 




■M 

£ 
O 

O 


+H 
CD 


g 

02 


-d 




CJ 


1 CO 

J CO 

.23 




y 


.2 






u 


- 


Oh 




o 


03 


3 






1 


os: 










5 




Oh" 






lu 






















D 




















r^ 


Z 




















ro 


ULl 




















o< 


> 




















£ 


LU 




















Os 


EC 




















LO 


Z 




















W- 


o 






















z 























■o 

4> 

3 
E 

c 
o 
O 



re 

3 
C 

ns 

-3 



CO 

4) 
U 

c 
re 

re 

m 



73 
4> 

3 
£ 

£ 
O 

O 



UJ 
D 
Z 
LU 
> 
UJ 

• 

Z 

o 

z 



(0 
(0 
4> 

c 
■o 
a> 

•4-» 

XI 
fl> 

"a 

c 















© 














O O 




o 














© 














o o 


p 






























lO o 


to 






























rx o 


tN. 






























^ ^ 


oo 














© 














irf so 


»-H 














o 














rO CM 


VO 














00 














VO 


■3F 














T— I 














C\f 


Tt 














*9- 














w- 


w- 




o 


o 




c 


© 






c 


c 


c 


C 


c 


o 








p 


o 




c 


c 






c 


c 


c 


C 


c 


o 








o 


o 




c 


© 






c 


LT 


c 


c 


c 


d 








<o 


o 




c 


c 






c 


r^ 


c 


c 


o 


o 








o 


o 




c 


c 








( rc 


-t 


a^ 


( 2 


c 








































o 


o 




C 


© 






-f 


LT 


re 


" t^. 


' u- 


' d 








o 


LO 




in 


c 






o 


o- 


C 


Tt 




>r 








© 


"1- 






<n 








l^. 




VC 












T— 1 
















*— 














^ 


y* 














V. 


>■ 














Crt 
































T3 


© 


o 


•—1 




>* 
























3, 


<N 


rvj 


'u 




























3 


On 


CN 


ft 




3 
























to 


r-^ 


r— 1 


< 




i — > 
























C/J 

_3 


> 

o 


u 

o 


a; 

3 
•CJ 




3 




















4-> 




X 


£ 


<u 


2 




re 
o 




















>> 






3 


re 






















X3 


■5 


3 


-o 


o 




to 




















-o 


'$ 


•p 


<— ' 




a> 




















1) 




re 
o 

to 






<U 






c/ 




W2 V 


'y 






t/D 


w ' 


e 


*o 




CO 

3 








s 






C 


V) 


£ 


xj 


re 
o 


o 
o 


c- 


O vc 
h-t <N 




*0 


c 


c 


O O C 

J J _ 


2 






Q 
-a 


u 

4) 

re 


're 


x: 

s 




o *- 

j3 




o 
PQ 


^ 

^ 


1— 


5. ^t ^ ^ ^ 


£ 


5 


4-1 

u 










ft 


-t 


rt 


^ 


n 


tr 




3 


to 














C/3 
















H 








VO 


~- 


) t>N, W 


> ' 


»— i 


a 


V 














o 








u-> 


c 


> lO ,- 


1 


fO 


£ 


> 














p 








Tf 


-f 


: irj r- 




lO 


O 


\ 














LO 








ON 


1 


■ r^ Tt 




LO 


















r^ 








ro 


•c 


> Tt r- 


4 


VO 


CV 


1 














00 










































O 


ir 


> r-H C 


5 


rC 


1 
















»— I 








T-H 


T— 


( Tf C 


1 


o\ 


JZ 


> 














vO 








C\ 


I 


■ «— 1 r- 




"\ 




1 






















m- 








<& 




















m- 



(0 

■4-» 

c 

3 

o 
o 
o 

< 



(0 

< 



<y *0 



«n C/5 re 

*o o 



T3 

3 

3 

*0 fc XJ 

3 r- C 

to gfe 

a i-J ^ 

re 

3 "8 



w 



re 



re 



to 

= 11 

C^3 



o o 

X! h-i 

ffi "o 

x: o 

h 1 ^ x: 

U ffi X 



to *S 



.— 


XJ 


pM 


OJ 




•o 






C/3 


o 


__ 


pq 


re 





o <u 



^1 

CM 



© 

© 

© 

© 

eg 

vo 

<M 
</3 



co 



o ro CO vo in 

O -^ »0 On M 

© CM 0\ C\j ro 

o tN. vq^ -^ tt 

o ©" irT oC crT 

•— i © ro »— i 

< — i <— i 



© © 
© © 

© © 

M ©^ 
CM 



© 
© 

© 

© 
© 



13 

3 
C 

£ 
O 

o 



UJ 

D 
Z 
UJ 

> 

UJ 
QC 

z 
o 

z 



(0 

D 
QC 

I- 



o 

o 

a, 









(a 

-4-1 H 

H 



"^ 'CD 

'> 

Q 



o 



u <l> 

u % 
5^ 

a as 

i— I 

V- 

OJ *o3 

£ a 

w c 



© 
© 

© 
© 



CM cm 

v© <M 






45 
U 



3 
fe 



O u 

f bo 






W r- 






U £ £ 



fl 


>> 


u 


*j 


C/3 


U 




!*> 


~ 


.Q 










rt 


"T3 




<U 


,fi 


W2 




D 


U 





INDEX 



Accountant's Report 177-208 

Assets and Liabilities 7 

Auditor's Report by Departments 57-132 

Auditor's Balance Sheet 10 

Auditor's Debt Statement 11-12-13 

Cemeteries— Trust Funds 134-148-149-150-151 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds 139 

Cardinal O'Connell Parkway 174 

Debt maturing 1919 169 

Expenditures — Isolation Hospital 175 

New High School 173 

Pawtucket Bridge 172 

Other Bridges 172 

Financial Statement 47-55 

Indebtedness 11 

Land Owned by the City for Burial Purposes 167 

Loans 13-168 

Property Owned by City — Valuation 154-166 

Receipts and Payments — Classified 15-45 

Sinking Funds .1 133-135-136-137-138-139-140-141-142-143-144-145 

Tax Rates 150-166 

Treasurer's Report 147-148-149-150-151 

Trust Funds 135-146-171 

By Accounts 

Acquiring Land, Constructing New High School 126 

Acquiring Land and Constructing Schools 126 

Assessors 60 

Auditor 59 

Auditing City Books 116 

Band Concerts 99 

Cardinal O'Connell Parkway 101 

Cemeteries 108 

Chambers St. Playground 128 

Charity Department 86 

Dependent Mothers 87 

Citv Clerk 61 

City Debt 110 

City Hall 64 

City Hall Boilers 73 

Claims 116 

Comfort Station 79 

Commissioners 58 

Dummer St. Sale Buildings 124 

Elections and Registration 63 

Engineering 62 

Execution of Court 117 

Fairgrounds — Parks 128 

Fire 67 

Fire Specials 73 

Fish and Game Wardens 71 

Fourth of July 99 

General Expense 117 

German War .' 91 

Health 76-77 

Inspection of Buildings 69 

" Wires 70 

" Milk and Vinegar 78 

" Animals 78 



Inspection School Children 78 

Insurance 64 

Interest 110 

Isolation Hospital 120 

Inlv 4th 99 

Labor Day 99 

Land for Public Parks 128 

Law 61 

Library 104 

License Commission 60 

Lighting- Streets 83 

Liquor Licenses 112 

Macadamizing 122 

Mayor 58 

Memorial Day 100 

Messenger 62 

Moths 71 

Municipal Purposes 132 

New Sidewalks 123 

Park Purposes 128 

Parks : 98 

Parks — Special 98 

Paving 122 

Pawtucket Falls Bridge 123 

Purchasing Agent 63 

Police 66 

Police Specials 73 

Pound Keeper , 72 

Restoring Portraits— Memorial Hall 104 

Reconstruction Library and Memorial Hall 104 

Revision of Ordinance 116 

Rifle Range 68 

Schools 78-94-95 

School House Repairs — State Police 126 

Sealer 70 

Sewer Construction 120 

Sewer Maintenance 79 

Sinking Funds 110-134 

Smoke 77 

Soldiers' Benefits 90 

Soldiers' Graves 91 

Streets 82-83 

Street Watering 83 

Taxes — County V 7 

Grade Crossings 113 

Highways 113 

Levy 8-9 

National Bank 112 

Soldiers' Exemption , 113 

State 112 

Textile School 95 

Treasurer 59 

Veteran Firemen's Association 100 

Waterwavs 72 

Water Works 106 

Purifying and Constructing Water System 130 

Purchase Land 130 

Additions to Plant No. 2 130 

Wedge and Porter Sts 123 

Weigher 72 

Widening School and Mammoth Road 124 

Workmen's Compensation Act 117 



Seventh Annual Report 



OF THE 



Commissioner of 
Water Works 

OF THE 

City of Lowell, Mass. 

To the Municipal Council, for the year ending 

Dec. 31, 1918 and being the Forty-sixth 

Annual Report of the Water 

Works Department 



Including Reports of the Superintendent, 
City Engineer and Registrar 

1918 



THE LAWLER PRINTING CO. 



The annual report of the operation of the Water 
Works Department of the City of Lowell for 1918, by the 

Superintendent, ROBERT J. THOMAS, 
Engineer, STEPHEN KEARNEY, 
Registrar, J. W. CRAWFORD, 

to Hon. Charles H. Morse, Commissioner Water Works 
and Fire Protection, Lowell, Mass. 



oc 




f— ' 




o^ 




r~\ 




cri 




W 




C£ 




o 




£ 


* 


K 


c/3 


H 


w 


e 




< 


H 


> 


£ 


K" 


h— 1 


J 


Q 


^ 






< 


O 


— 


J 


o 




55 


»- 


i— ( 


H 


W 


S5 


Hi 


H 


- 




fa 
O 


H 




< 

< 


< 


to 


a 


J 




<! 




HH 




o 




z 




<J 




z 








« 4> g 



o 



o 

- r-l 
gi-H 








ti 


^J 


ti 




tf 








a 


































p" - " 


• *^ 


-X 


. <•« 




-^ 


.■C 


>y< 




















3 


fe 


P; 


£ 


fc 




J? 


§ 










s<n 












"^ 


■* 


Tf 


«ji 




TJH 


■* 


"* 




O 


_ 




c 


c 


c 


c 


o 














c 


















o 


5 


3 


p 




o 


c 


p 


3 


<C) 


cc 


l~ 


* 




*r 


3 


-r 


lit 


l~ 


cc 


CI 


i- 




i~ 


X 


ic 


r^ 




1-1 


cj 


^ 






fe- 


rH 





o 


2 


o 
o 


t- 


o 
c 


c 


CO 




CI 



c 2 
5 'it 











i— 




CI 




:t 




-r 


ir 


H 


C} 


C 




CI 




K 




cc 




-i- 


c 


CI 


c 




3" 




35 




35 




r. 




31 


o* 


05 


T— 




•— 




H 




H 




rH 




r- 


r- 


r- 


o 


Q 




^ 




c: 




:: 




-f 




1C 


C9 • 


05 


r" 




r- 




r- 




r- 




r- 




r* 


iH • 


<X 


05 




c-. 




35 




35 




05 




05 


05 • 


rH 


tH 




rH 


-4-> 

o 


H 


■4-1 


H 


S* 


T— 






rH ■ 

O* 
-t— 
0i 

OB 










F4 




;- 




;_ 






f< 




































r 




■r. 




'/■ 


















01 




1 




0) 








5 






92 



El 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 

LOWELL WATER WORKS, 1918. 

Appropriation for Purification Plant, 1918, and Department 

Equipment. 

Balance from 1917 $2,308.80 

Transferred to Water Works for labor and material 2,308.80 

Appropriation for Purchase of Land. 

Balance from 1917 $4,870.51 

Paid for land $100.00 

Paid for P. S. No. 2 985.00 

$1,085.00 
Balance to 1919 3,785.51 

$4,870.51 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 
LOWELL WATER WORKS, 1918. 



Maintenance. 
Labor: 

Office and officials $18,943.00 

Pumping station 37,166.92 

Filter 10,443.98 

General maintenance 59,667.11 

$126,221.01 

Material : 

Water works supplies $14,075.90 

Pumping station supplies 4,373.02 

Coal 57,018.19 

Stable 12,797.50 

Filter 744.88 

$89,009.49 

$215,230.50 
Construction. 

Labor $10,540.73 

Material 10,898.59 

$21,439.32 



00 
J-i 



W 

O 

e 

o 

e 

< 

CO 

<< 

r— I 

o 

< 

HH 



cC 

O 
8h 



H M I- W O 

^ t> co c\i a 

CO rH o" O O 

rH O CM CO O 

O CO^ rH CO_ CO 

■hT t— T co" co" t>^ 

>0 L— rH O CO 



O rH 

CM ^ 

r-i CO 

ic~r i— r 

co 
■€&■ 



O 

■HH 

o 

GO^ 
co" 
CO 
CO 
•€©■ 



o 


i-O 


CO 


CM 


O 


/"> 1 


o 


q 


cm 


t> 


CO 


o 


Tt* 


C5 


C"* 1 


CO 


CO 


lo 


r— 


CM 


ci 


CO 


O 


rh 


co^ 


"^ 


CM 


rH 


rH 


CM^ 


of 


-h" 


co" 


rH 


O 


co" 


CO 


O 




o 




o 




CO 




CO 




CO 




-ee- 




^fi- 




■<=£• 



<D 



CO 



CO LO 

CO o 

rH t> '"l r- 

C5 P* CM £5 
rH LO O 

■€©■ 

■+»> 

^ S^ t — L ~~ 

J "fe <•*> s 

« -2 <M 52 

' CC LO^ ^ 



t- 


in 


CO 


cn 


cc 


CM 


l> 


CO 


oS 


cd 


t> 


O 


Ol 


Ol 


t- 


co 


rH 


os_ 


cq__ 


o 


co" 


cT 


cf 


Th 


y-\ 


C5 


t> 


rH 

cc 



s & 



■6©- 






CO ° 

M rH 
■€©■ 



C5 t 

-H CO 
CTi CO 



Ci CTi 

rH CO 

rH CM 

CM CO 

Ci CO 



I Ol 



LO 



co 

rH 1- 
■€©■ r^ 

as 

rH 
O 

q ,g 

co' c 

co *-• 
oo^ ^ 



DC 



Sh . . Cl 

P ft C3 7 u 



c 



C3 
ft 



-H> 

O 



O 

CO 



CM 



q ^ 
co' co* 

^H OS 



O 
CM 

CO* 
C7i 
CO 

co" 



CO ^f 

rH O 

C-* CO 

CO LO 

t> co^ 

co" oT 

L— CO 



CO 
rH 

go' 

LO) 

co" 

C5 



q cm 

CO rH 
CO C5 
rH^ CO^ 

C-" rH" 

CO CO 



ft. 



c 

CO 

o 

ft 
d 

o 

'■+J 

C3 
Fh 
■j-j 

CO 

"d 



H3 



CD 

co 

d 

o 

ft 



CO o 
CM tt! 

r)n o 
O t- 

LO^ CO 

cm" of 

■c©' M 



CO -t-j 

^ (—1 

O 

CO O 

CO CC 

3 5 



CO 
C5 
CO 



rH CO 

q tjh 
O co' 

rH GO 
O-^ CO 

co" co" 



Xf. 



7Z 



05 
ft 
. _^ co CC ac 

p a ^ 'S --g g 5 p ^ 

^ ft iu, ^ ft <2l, ^- ft ^h >. P 

Phco a Ah cc SPhco^hh^ 



ft 



o 
o 

cc 

C5 
rH 

C35 



CC 

ft 

d 

d 

CD 

d 

^c 

lc 



o 
q 

o 
o 

CO lO H 
^ CO ^ 
CM • 



cm q 

CO o 
-H O 



o 



ft 






J. 


fl 


d 


CD 


S 


s 

r*4 


r*S 


cC 


CC 


ft 


ft 






CD 






w 


§ ft 


a: 


'3 


o 


a 


+— 




r^ 


H 




, 



o 



cC 
ft 
CD 



CD 
rd 



o 

«H 

CO 
!H 
CD 

Sf-1 
CO 

a 

cC 



rd 

CO 

cC 

CD 



<1 



t— CI 
CM !>; 

C35 CM' 
CO CO 
<* CM 

C5" 
i-\ 
CO 
^^ 



.& 

"CD 
CD 
CD 

ra 

CO 

cC 
CD 



cC 

-Hi 

o 

Eh 



CO 

q 

CM 

crT 

r— i 

CO 





CO 
CD 




W 




a 




CD 




ft 


V 


M 


n 


CD 


Cj; 






, 


— 


CC 


efl 


-H 


- 


o 


P- 


Eh 













© © 


o 


03 


o 


Q 


CM 




o 


Ci 


r-i 


Oi 








LO © 


p CO 


p 


o 


CO 


— 


l^ in 


p 








in cd 


© ci 


o 


in 


CM 


n 


oi in 


co 








CO O 


CD CO 


o 


co 


m 


~ 


CD CO 


CO 








w © 


© -^ 


rH 


OS 


CO 


R 


CM t> CO^ 








©" H CD" rH 






m" 


^H 


co" 


CO 








O HH 


rH CM 












rfH 








CM 














CO 








-^ 














->> 








© Q 
































ITS ,0 
































in in 
































CO o 
































N ©^ 
































m" m" 
































tH CO 


























CO 






CO 


























tH 
































^ 




y: 
































i— ( 




03 

?H 
3 






























» 




+3 












<— 






. pj 


DO 














*9 












O 

• l-H 

4J 




ex 


o 
1 a 

C3 
■ cS 


0- 

— 

i — i 

03 










O 




& 










• PS 




o 

CD 


& ■ 












~ji \ 






_^ Fh 




0) 












3 




u 
"53 

o 




ec 

c 


sinking fui 
W. W. con 


r— 
w 
r- 


Rep. P. Sta 
Trans, to cl 


03 

• — 

r. 

X 

- 

D 
— 

— 


p 

1— 


T3 

co 




> 


W 




.2 


(= 


H u 
o c 


c 


o o 


— 






"** 


S 




°3 ^ 


c 


hH mH 


e<- 


«4H e+H 


fet- 






)J 


w 




*-" S 


««-: 


•+J 4-= 


^ 


-4-J -+J 


4- 


+3 






H 




03 ^ 


p; 


1-4 <-* 


P 


C fl 


1 — 


Sh 03 








Ch S 


a; 


03 03 


a. 


CD CP 


£ 


CD 03 








o £ 
d 

o M 




s a e 




s s a 
r r cs 




K^ 






cc 


co cc 


K 


ct o3 


CC 


co co 




r~~ 




fe 


p- 


Pn Pi 


P- 


Pn PU 


P- 


Ph pp 




o 


Q 
























J 


W 






« 


3 








GO ^H O CM 


Oi 


H 






c 


3 ' 








rH t- O O 


p 




< 






r* 


H 








H CO d l> 


CO 


e 






(j 


] 








CO CO O rH 


CO 


Q 






T- 


H 








o^ m^ o^ c^ 


CD^ 


z 








a 


■T 








t+t t>-~ co" co" 


co" 






■9 


9- 








CO rH rH rH 


—jH 


a 
s 


O 
















CM 
■€©■ 






CO 


H 

h 


o 




in © rH 


CD O 


CO CM 












O 




rH CO* © 


r-i CO 


rH O 












<J 






tH O I 




GO t- 


CO CO 
















a co co 


T-\ •*# 


Ttt CO 












CO 
































H CM TJH 


CO Ol 


m go 
















T& 




CO i—l 


t— 




















CM 




CM 






















^^ 




^3- 












J 


































< 




w 






























r- 1 




-(-j 




























o 




.& 






















cO 






£ 




'5 

03 


















rH 










<3 




« 
















03 




+1 

c0 


• GO 

• rH 




ss 






















B 


• CTi 

• r-\ 










jS 








4^9 

a 


1 




P. 

03 




1 

CO 












r-T 






03 r 

g t 

> CF 


■4 

i 
< 

H 

H 
■j 




• i— i 

03 

s 




H '" 

o 


■H 

H 

>< cu 

j a 

H 03 
3 OJ 










ri 




o c 


> 




o 




o 


3 i^ 










* u 




h i 


H 




Fh 




*H , 


H '^ 










^a o r 


— 


S+H 6f 


-( 




M-j 




mH ^ 














•■d t 


3 




nd 




^3 r 


= ^ 










£ <C 


rt 


a> c 


3 




03 




o 


d a 














> P 


> 




r> 




> 


> CO 














H 




• i— ( 






-< rH 










* & 


r\ 


03 C 


J 




03 




03 


13 ' — ' 










r-H 


C3 C 


J 




03 




03 


03 , 










CO Ch 


Oh 


C3 « 


J 




03 




03 


13 S 










P 


5 < 


1 - 


•4 


P 


^ P 


3 




Ph* 




P 


5 P 


4 o 





Superintendent's Report 



Lowell, Mass., January 1, 1919. 
Mr. Charles J. Morse, 

Commissioner of Water Works and Fire Protection 
of the City of Lowell, Massachusetts. 
• Dear Sir : — 

Following" is the annual report of the Superintendent of 
Water Works, setting forth the construction, maintenance and' 
operation work of the Department for the year 1918 : 

Yield of Water from Wells for the Last Five Years. 

1914 Gallons Gallons 

Boulevard wells 1,669,000,059 

Cook wells 429,043,968 2,098,044,027 

1915 

Boulevard wells 1,794,362,400 

Cook wells 150,597,440 1,944,959,840 

1916 

Boulevard wells 2,173,419,200 

Cook wells No Pumpage 2,173,419,200 

1917 

Boulevard wells 2,186,550,000 

Cook and hydraulic wells 111,295,232 2,297,845,232 

1918 

Boulevard wells 2,109,693,000 

Cook and hydraulic wells 668,389,248 2,778,082,248 

These figures show an increase in total pumpage from the 
two well fields of 480,237,016 gallons for 1918, as compared 
with the previous year. Of this quantity the Boulevard wells 
fell off 76,857,000 gallons, while the Cook wells were drawn upon 
for 668,389,248 gallons, against 111,295,232 gallons in 1917, and 
none in 1916. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 9 

The water from the Cook wells is undesirable because of 
its action on lead pipe and excessive cost of pumping-, but, owing' 
to shortage of the Boulevard supply, became necessary. 
Coal Used for Pumping the Last Five Years. 

1914 5,806,027 lbs. Gals, pumped per lb. of coal . .674 

1915 4,583,668 lbs. Gals, pumped per lb. of coal . .838 

1916 4,891,213 lbs. Gals, pumped per lb. of coal . .915 

1917 5,769,572 lbs. * Gals, pumped per lb. of coal . .803 

1918 8,925,953 lbs. Gals, pumped per lb. of coal . .561 

Cost of coal purchased in 1914 $12,933.43 

Cost of coal purchased in 1915 13,493.65 

Cost of coal purchased in 1916 18,371.07 

Cost of coal purchased in 1917 30,541.05 

Cost of coal purchased in 1918 61,523.87 

The excessive cost of coal of last year was due in a great 
measure to high prices and the inferior quality of the coal 
supplied ; also, of course, to the increased pumpage. 

Purification Plant. 

The Purification, or Filter, Plant is in a very bad condi- 
tion. The coke prefilters are clogged with iron deposit to such 
an extent that they are only capable of caring* for one-half 
their rated capacity. This means the overhauling of each filter 
basin, and the replacement of some of the coke. The sand filters 
are also in need of new sand, and a thorough washing of the 
old sand. 

This latter work has been hampered by the poor water pres- 
sure obtainable, and the remedy calls for a pump of about 500 
gallons per minute capacity against a head of 200 feet. Prices 
obtained on a turbine centrifugal pump of the required capa- 
city, etc., to be installed at the Pumping Station, call for an 
outlay of $1,800. 

Construction. 

Fifty new two and one-half inch wells should be added to 
the present Boulevard Well Plant, which can be seen by the 
figures of last year's pumping, is inadequate to meet consump- 
tion. Part of the material for these new wells is now on hand, 
and they should be installed as soon as possible. Under the 



10 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 

head of construction, also, should be included cast iron mains for 
distributing water. For the last five years the following 
amounts were laid : 

Cost 
Feet Total Cost per Ft. 

1914 5105 $18,243.40 $3.57— 

1915 9113 23,970.45 2.63 

1916 5885 18,917.69 3.21 

1917 5720 28,486.49 4.98 

1918 4279 21,439.32 5.01+ 

These figures show less extension of street mains the past 

year than for five previous years, with the prospect for the ye^r 

1919 of still less pipe laying, so that probably about $15,000 
would be sufficient to meet all demands in this line of work. 

Gates and Hydrants. 
Fifteen new gates and nine new hydrants were set during 
last year. 

CONSUMPTION. 

. Following is the average daily consumption for the last 
five years, with total annual charges for water : 

Gallons 

1914 5,983,614 $245,101.42 

1915 5,427,382 238,512.63 

1916 6,096,074 265,562.53 

1917 6,479,729 266,793.27 

1918 7,544,243 314,047.66 

These figures show quite a jump in the consumption of wa- 
ter for 1916 over the previous year, with a corresponding in- 
crease in water charges. In 1918, as compared with 1917, the 
consumption and the charge for water show a still more de- 
cided growth, making a gain of $47,254.39 as compared with 
1917. Indications point, at this time, to a material reduction 
in consumption of water for 1919, and a consequent loss in 
water charges, unless the rates are increased. 

That the water rates should be adjusted to meet present 
outlay for labor and material, no one doubts. At least, the 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 11 

deficit in the revenues of last year of practically $67,000 should 
be sufficiently convincing' of the necessity of a larger income. 
Whether this increase in income should in part be borne by 
taxpayers as an appropriation for fire service, or whether the 
water takers should bear the whole burden, is a matter for 
careful consideration. 

SERVICES. 

Following is the number of new services laid and old ser- 
vices changed during the last five years : 

Year New Old 

1914 160 163 

1915 277 184 

1916 202 93 

1917 178 153 

1918 112 201 

The last year shows a material falling off in new work, 
which, of course, means a smaller increase in the number of 
new customers, and was due to less activity in the building line. 

Up to last year, the brass fittings which go on every service, 
such as corporation, curb and cellar cocks, were made in the 
Water Works shop, but last March the shop was practically 
closed and the department purchased these and all brass goods 
required, making a saving in both material and labor which 
entered into the cost of new service. 

On account of the severe cold of last January and Febru- 
ary one hundred and sixty-four services had to be repaired, 
which is far more than the usual number, not to speak of the 
large number that were thawed out. 

During the year 1918, the number of meters frozen, and 
removed for that reason, exceeded all previous years, and owing 
4o the laying off of the machinists and other help at the Water 
Works repair shop, about 700 of these meters were not re- 
paired or reset. 

This condition necessitated the making of average bills in 
place of the regular meter bills, which is unsatisfactory, both 
to the water taker and to the department. It also probably led 



12 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORK^. 

to considerable waste of water in these temporarily unmetered 
premises. 

These meters should be repaired and reset, and those that 
are out of order in cellars, of which there are a large number, 
ought to be taken out and put in condition. It will undoubt- 
edly pay in water saved, to do this work. 

FINANCIAL. 

Although comparatively less work in the way of new ser- 
vices, main pipe extension, new hydrants, stop valves and gen- 
eral upkeep was done tiie past year, yet, owing to the high 
cost of material and labor, the receipts of the department prpved 
hopelessly inadequate. One of the great causes of expenditures 
for the past year overrunning receipts was the high price and 
inferior quality of the coal supplied at the different pumping 
stations for pumping. The pay roll for last year was less than 
in 1917, but still very much larger than for the previous three 
years. 

That the pay roll was not still larger was due to the fact 
that less work was done, and that the repair shop was practi- 
cally closed down for several months. During November and 
December, the shop was again started and the pay rolls mount- 
ed to upwards of $13,000 per month, or $156,000 per year. 

To meet this condition of high cost of labor, coal, etc., a 
radical increase in the revenues of the department must be made. 

The consolation that in 1920-21 the maturing of the sink- 
ing fund will save the department about $60,000 annually must 
not deter us from increasing the income of the department for 
present needs. Nor should we lose sight of the fact that some 
time our present driven well system will prove inadequate as a 
water supply for the city. 

Even today it might be profitable to look into the future 
and consider the problem of a greater and more permanent 
supply. Up to date Lowell 's expenditures for water supply have 
been comparatively small. Driven wells within the city limits 
offered an easy, convenient and cheap way of getting good wa- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 13 

ter, much more so than if it becomes necessary, for instance, to 
connect with the Metropolitan Water Works at Clinton. There- 
fore, it seems the part of wisdom to amply provide the means 
for maintaining and extending the driven well system, so that 
it may be sufficient to meet the needs of the city as long as pos- 
sible. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Much of the equipment of the department is in very bad 
condition, especially the steam boilers at the West Sixth street 
and Boulevard pumping stations, and the pumping machinery 
at the Cook Wells and West Sixth street pumping station. The 
buildings of the department need repairing and repainting, and 
the Cook Wells pumping station should be entirely rebuilt when 
a new pump is purchased. Trucks, wagons and horses of the 
department are so old they cannot be counted on for much fur- 
ther service. Machine tools and other tools at the shop should 
be overhauled and in some cases replaced, especially those in- 
tended for service and meter repair work. 

The amount of cast iron pipo and special castings in stock 
is comparatively low. 

Respectfully submitted 

ROBERT J. THOMAS, 

Superintendent. 



14 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



NEW SERVICE, 1918. 



No. Kind Feet 



86 Y A in. Galvanized Iron 3.442.6 

11 1 in. Galvanized Iron 64S.0 

3 1 y 2 in. Galvanized Iron 221 .2 

5 2 in. Galvanized Iron 144.6 

1 '2Y 2 in. Black Iron 2.16.0 

1 3 in. Galvanized Iron 375.0 

1 4 in. Cast Iron 93.0 

4 6 in. Cast Iron 182.11 



112 ' 5.803.1 

Total previously laid 554.735 feet 

Total now laid 560.098 feet 

Total number services laid ' 14.977 

Total number cut off at main 1,085 

Total number reconnected 93 

Total number now in use 13 985 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



15 



SERVICES CHANCED. 1918. 





1 
Kind 






Changed To 




No. 


Gal. 
Iron 

/4 in. 


Gal. 

iron 
1 in. 


Gal. 
Iron 
ihin 


Gal. 

Iron 
2 in. 


Lead 
lin. 


Total 


4 


1! 

^in. Lead 50- 6 

1 1 


1 








I 50- 6 


1 


1 

*H$in. Lead 

II 


7- 9 | 








7- 


14 


II 
^in. Lead 214- 5 

1 1 










| 214- 5 


1 


1 
3/in. Lead 

1 1 


67- 1 








67- 


1 i 


1 in. Lead 14- C 

i i 










14- 6 


7 1 


i 1 l 
lin. Lead 

1 1 I 


80- 








I 80- 


1 | 


II 1 
lin. Lead 

1 








8-11 


| 8-11 


2 I 


34in. Lead L. 84- 










i 84- 


2 ! 


34in. Lead L. 

1 1 1 


78- 5 i 








| 78- 5 


40 1 


I • 

34in. Tron H 061-10 ' 

I I 1 










j 031-10 


13 • 


I 1 
lin. Iron II 278- 3 

1 1 l 










1 278- 3 


8 1 


1 ' 1 
lin. Iron 

1 ' 1 


137- 6 ! 








] 137- C 


l ! 


1 1 1 
1^2 in. Iron 

1 1 1 




3S-6 






1 38- 6 


9 1 


1 ' 1 
2in. Iron 

|| 






2S-2 1 




28- 2 


70 1 


34111. Tin L. M 1.003- 5 ' 

M 1 










1 1.003- r, 


14 1 


, 1 

^in. Tin L. M 

j ; j 


446-10 ! 








446-10 


1 | 


34in. Tin L. II 

1 1 1 




10-0 ' 






19- 


1 ! 


lin. Tin L. II 17- S ! 

II' 1 










17- 8 


I 


1 ' 1 
lin. Tin L. II 

II 1 


164- 6 1 








164- 6 


201 | 


II 

N 
1! 


3,524- 7 | 


982- 1 


58-3 1 


2S-2 ' 


8-11 ! 


1 4 602- 8 



16 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 

r __-, , .^. r METERS. 

Meters running January 1. 191S 1 1.8S9 

New Meters set 191 8 174 

Meters discontinued 1 

Meters condemned and not replaced 1 

Total increase for year 172 



Meters running January 1, 1919 12.0G1 

Meters condemned and replaced 5 

Private meters sold 21 

Private meters changed 2 

Private meters discontinued 1 

Private meters repaired 2 

Meters changed 7 

Meters stopped 401 

Meters frozen and repaired 583 

Meters stored at shop 35 

Meters leaking 50 

Meters out for test S 

Meters out — hands gone 14 

Meters out — put in stock 12 

Meters discontinued 1 

Temporary meters set 4 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



17 



METERS RUNNING JANUARY 1, 1919, 



Sizes in Inches 



% in. 1 in. l/'2in 2 in. 3 in. 4in.fi in. 8 in. 



Columbia j 74 

Crown j 3210 

Desper 



Duplex 

Empire 271 

Empire Compound 

Gem 

Gem Empire .... 

Hersey j 2052 

Hersey Detector .... 
Keystone 62 

King 80 

I 

Lambert 814 

Nash , 569 

Niagara 1 

Thomson 6 

Torrent 

Trident .... 

Union 

Watch Dog 
Worthington 
Worth- Disc. 



574 

27 

348 

38 

758 



Total 



8899 



1 

1653 
4 

45 



268 



3 

90 

118 

14 

34 
7 

20 
1 

36 



2294 



337 

3 

1 

10 



57 



19 

56 



16 

27 
22 



26 



22 



1 

1 

4 

30 

11 



46 



17 



1 
28 
12 



1 

27 



550 



101 



121 


27 


30 


33 


6 



Total 

75 

5,291 

21 

2 

344 

2 

10 

2 

2,423 

40 

63 

83 

925 

745 

1 

21 

3 

610 

35 

390 

132 
843 



12,061 



18 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



NEW HYDRANTS, 1918. 

Bennett Street laid low Hydrant 

Fairgrove Avenue Ludlow Hydrant 

Farragut Street Ludlow Hydrant 

Pineview Avenue Ludlow Hydrant 

Rogers Street Corey Hydrant 

Stedman Street Chapman Hydrant 

Stcdman Street Ludlow Hydrant 

Tyler Street Corey Hydrant 

White Street Ludlow Hydrant 

9 New Hydrants set 1918. 

HYDRANTS CHANGED, 1918. 

Locat'on Taken Out Set 

Central St., opp. Cady Chapman Ludlow 

Central St., cor. diaries Flush 

( Jentral St., opp. North " 

( U Mitral St., near Opera House 

Central St., cor. Union .• . Corey 

Concord St., cor. Pond Ludlow 

Fairfield St Smith 

French St., near cor. Bridge . . Chapman 

High St., cor. Rogers Ludlow 

Lawrence St., opp. No. 466 .... Flush 

Marshall St., near Mclntire .. lt 

Mcivinley Ave Ludlow " 

Middlesex, opp. Middlesex Park Boston Machine . Corey 

North St., cor. Lawrence Flush Chapman 

Palmer St., near Merrimack . . Chapman Smith 

Pine St., cor. Bennet Edcly Ludlow 

Rock St., cor. Mt. Vernon .... Chapman " 

Saratoga St " Eddy 

Summer St., cor. South Flush Corev 

Tyler St.. below Hill's Block . . " 

Webber St . . Boston Post 

Woodward Ave Chapman Ludlow 

22 Hydrants changed 1918. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



19 



HYDRANTS, JANUARY 1, 1919. 



Kind 


Flush 


2 Noz. 


3 Noz. 


4 Noz. 


Total 


Chapman 


999 


3 

•2'.) 


IGG 

120 

1 

G2 

32 

19 

1 

1 
1 

625 1 
5 

1 J 
48 

2G 
17 


51 
1 

14 
1 


IGG 
174 


Coffin 


1 


Corey 

Eddy 


62 
33 


Fairbanks 


19 


Flush 

Glanmorgan 


222 
1 


Holvoke 


1 


Lowrey 7 


1 
7 


Ludlow 


boo 


Michigan 


5 


I 
O'Brien ! 


1 


A. P. Smith 

Perkins 


48 
1 


Pratt & Cady 

1 

Walker \ 


2G 

17 


1 

i 





Totals 



1.12.1 



G7 1.413 



20 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



LOW SERVICE— WATER PIPE LAID 
DURING THE YEAR 1918. 



Street 



Location 



Length of pipe in 
4 in. 6 in. 8 in. 



feet 
10 in. 



1 

"A" St. 


Service to Winchester Laundry 
Co 


90. 1 

G. 

31 fi. 


1 
137. 




Anderson St. 


Connecting ends 




P.ennett St. 


Connecting ends 




Devine Ave. 


Old end Ely to Pineview Ave. 




57. 




Fairgrove A. 


Princeton St. northerly 




297. 






Farragnt St. 






122. 






Fourth Ave. 


Endicott to Farragut St 






267. 




Market St. 


Fire service to No. 91 




10. 






Phebe Ave. 




168. 




\ 


Pineview Av. 




80. 






Pleasant St. 






415. 






Rogers St. 


Old end to City 7 Line 








38. 


Stackpole St. 


Fire service to St. John's Hos. 




44. 






Stedman St. 


1 Old end southerly 




280. 


1435. 




Upham St. 


Old end easterly 




169. 






White St. 


Old end northerly to Emery Av. 




201. 






| 90. 


2165. 


1839. 


38. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



21 



LOW SERVICE— LIST OF STOP GATES SET 
DURING THE YEAR 1918. 



Street 



Location 



4 6 8 1L' 
in. in. in. in. 



*"A" St. 

Central St. 

Central St. 

Central St. 

Central St. 

Central St. 

Concord St. 
♦Fairgrove A. 

Farragut St. 

Fourth Ave. 

Lawrence St. 
♦Market St. 
♦Middlesex St. 

Pleasant St. 

Stackpole St. 

Stedman St. 



(51 ft. east of east line Puffer St., 11 ft. south 
of north line "A" St 



| 8 ft. north of south lino Tyler St., 12 ft. 
east of west line Central St. On hydrant 

I 4 ft. north of north line Charles St., 13 ft. 
I east of west line Central St. On hydranl 

I 

| 7 ft. north of north line Union St., 12 ft. east 

I of west line Central St. On hydrant 



5 ft. north of south line Cady St.. 11 ft. east 
of west line Central St. On hydrant 

On north line Elm St., 17 ft. east of west 
line Central St. 



1) ft. south of south line Pond St., S ft. east 
of west line Concord St. On hydrant . . . . 



J 11 ft. south of north line Princeton st, 12 ft. 
east of west line Fairgrove Ave 



On west line Fourth Ave., 12 ft. south of 
north line Farragut St 



On north line Endieott St., 15 ft. east of 
west line Fourth Ave 



1SS ft. south of south line Hudson St.. 8 ft 
west of east line Lawrence St. on Ilydt... 

117 ft. east of east line Palmer St., 17 ft. 
south of north line Market St 

30 ft. west of east line Grosvonor St., 20 ft. 
south of north line Middlesex St 

On south line Powers St.. 13 ft. east of west 
line Pleasant St 

109 ft. west of west line Livormore St.. 10 ft. 
south of north line Stackpole St 

2 ft. south of east line Wilbur St.. 13 ft. east 
of west line Stedman St 



2| 111 2| 1 



♦Indicates Smith Gates. 



22 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



LOW SERVICE— SMALL SIZE DISTRIBUTION 
PIPE LAID DURING THE YEAR 1918. 



Street 
F.elmont Ave. 



Kind 
Ludlow 



Location 
. . On West side opp. Ilovey St. 



Street 
Belmont Ave. 



Street 
Carmine St. 



Kind 
Ludlow 



Location 
.On West side M)l ft. south of Summit St. 



Location 
From end old pipe to Pelton St. 



Length of pipe in ft. 
1 in. 2 in. Total 



Chamberlain St. I From Felton St. southerly, 



Circuit Ave. 
Felton St. 
Homestead Rd. 
Stedman St. 
Wilbur St. 



I From Felton St. to No. 200 

I 

I From Carmine St. southerly 

I 

I From Hildreth St. southerly and easterly 

I 

I From end G in. pipe southerly 

I 

I From Stedman St. southerly 





608. 


G08 


117. 


20G. 


323. 


158. 




158. 




305. 


305 




293. 


293 




403. 


403 


1 245. 


209. 


454 


520 


2024 


2544 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORK. 



23 



HIGH SERVICE— WATER PIPE LAID 
DURING THE YEAR 1918. 



Street 



Location 



Length of pipe in feet 

4 in. ('» in. 8 in. 



Belmont Ave. | Old end southerly to Ilovey St. 



14' 



HIGH SERVICE— LIST OF STOP GATES SET 
DURING THE YEAR 1919. 



Street 



Location 



Size 
4 o 8 
iii. in. in. 



Belmont Ave. | 42 ft. south of south line Ilovey St.. 11 ft. | 

east of west line Lelmont Ave. On hydrant | ... I II 



HIGH SERVICE— LIST OF STOP GATES RE- 
MOVED DURING THE YEAR 1918. 



Belmont Ave. I 301 ft. south of south line Summit St.. 11 ft | 
I east of west line lielmont Ave. On hydrant | 



LOW SERVICE— LIST OF HYDRANTS SET 
DURING THE YEAR 1918. 




Street Kind 

Bennett St Ludlow 

Central St 

Corey . . 

Ludlow 

<« << n 

Coneord St " 

Fair view Ave " 

Farragut St 

Lawrence St " 

TMneview Ave 

Rogers St Porpy . . 

Stedinan St T ndlo-w 

" " ^hnpman 

Tvlf»r St Porpy . . 

White St Ludlow 



Location 



On West side 22 ft. south of Light Ave. 
On West side opp. Tyler St. Changed from 
Flush. 

at Charles St. 



at Union St. 
opp. North St. 
opp. Cady St. 



Changed from 

Changed from 

Changed from 

Changed from 



.On WCst side 

Flush. 
.On West side 

Flush. 
.On West side 

Flush. 
.On West sid< 

Flush. 

On West side at Pond St. Changed from Flush. 
On West side at No. 20, 
On North side at Fourth Ave. 
On Fist aidp at No. 400 Changed from Flush. 
On West side 52 ft south of Devine Ave. 
On North side at Oitv Lino. 
On West side onp Wi""'r St. 
On West siile at No. 203. 
On S'.>uth side at Oent-nl St. 
On West side .°>0 ft. south of Emery Ave. 



24 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



SUMMARY. 



Low Service water pipe laid in 191S 4,132. ft. 

Low Service water pipe laid previous to 1918. 790,591.5 ft. 



794.923.5 ft. 
Low Service water pipe removed in 1918 .... 000. ft. 

Total Low Service water pipe in use Jan. 1, 

1919 794,923.5 ft. 

Higli Service water pipe laid in 1918 147. ft. 

High Service water pipe laid previous to 1918 52,193. ft. 



52,340. ft. 

High Service water pipe removed 191.8 000. ft. 

Total High Service water pipe in use Jan. 1, 

1919 52,340. ft. 



Total High and Low Service Jan. 1, 1919 
Total pipe in use Jan. 1, 1919, in miles. . 

LOW SERVICE. 

4" 34.197 feet 

6" 447.81 7 " 

8" 101.720.3 " 



84' 



,263.5 ft. 
160.46 



10" 
12" 
16" 

20" 
24" 
30" 



31,308.5 


<( 


71.228.8 


« 


26.235.9 


u 


8.059 


M 


9.194 


(( 


4.503 


(( 


794.923.5 


M 



4" 
6" 
8" 
10" 
12" 
16" 



HIGH SERVICE 

1 

30, 

4. 

9 



507 feet 
475.5 
057.5 
931 

8S5 
884 



52.340 



Low Service Hydrants set in 1918 ! 16 

High Service Hydrants set in 1918 1 

Low Service Hydrants removed in 1918 7 

High Service Hydrants removed in 1918 1 



Size 



. 


4 in. 


6 in. 


8 in. 


12 in. 




Low Service Stop dates set in 1918 

Low Service Stop (Jates removed in 1918 . . . 


2 


11 


2 


1 


= 16 


High Service Stop (rates set In 1U18 

High Service Stop Gates removed in 1918 . . . 




1 

1 






= 1 
= 1 



Report of the City Engineer 



Office of the City Engineer, 

Lowell, Mass., January 1, 11)19. 

To the Commissioner of Water Works and Fire 
Protection : 

Dear Sir: — 

I have the honor to submit the forty-sixth annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1918 : 

PUMPAGE. 

Total Net Pumpage for 1918 2,764,748,745 gallons 

Total Net Pumpage for 1917 2,353,368,177 gallons 

[ncrease in 11)18 411 ,380,568 gallons 

CONSUMPTION. 

Consumption, in 101 S 2.753,448,700 gallons 

Consumption in 1017 2,365.101,081 gallons 

Increase in 11)18 388.847,071) gallons 

The maximum pumpage for any one day was on Monday, August 
5th, viz. : 

At West Sixth Street Station 0.240,701) gallons 

At Cook Wells Station 3,059,200 gallons 



T 



Total 9,305,000 gallons 



26 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



The maximum pumpage for one week was of the week of August 
4th to August 10th, viz. : 

At West Sixth Street Station 41,205,354 gallons 

At Cook Wells Station 21,082,0-18 gallons 

Total 02,287.402 gallons 

High Service Pumpage for 1918 140.440.308 gallons 

High Service Pumpage for 1017 03,0.13,072 gallons 

Increase in 1018 46,495,386 gallons 

Cost of Low Service Pumpage in 1018 $30.01 per million gals. 

Cost of Low Service Pumpage in 1017 $22.06 per million gals. 

Increase in 1918 $ 8.85 per million gals. 

Cost of High Service Pumpage in 1918 $28.59 per million gals. 

Cost of High Service Pumpage in 1017 $22.83 per million gals. 

Increase in 1018 $ 5.75 per million gals. 

Cost of Low Service Pumpage, exclusive of 

Cook Wells, in 1018 $29.16 per million gals. 

Total Cost of High Service Pumpage (Cost of 
Low Service pins Cost of High Service, ex- 
clusive of Cook Wells), in 1918 $57.84 per million gals. 

Total Cost of High Service Pumpage (Cost of 
Low Service pins Cost of High Service, ex- 
clusive of Cook Wells), in 1017 $44.80 per million gals. 

Increase in 1918 $12.95 per million gals. 



o 

H 

to 

h4 
K 
> 

CO 

H 
W 

O 



CO 

T— ' 



& 



S a 

>— i 

a 
o 



o 
w 

CO 



O 

M 

H 

CO 

o 



^ ed 
Eh 



- o 
Or- 1 



*8 



6 



3 



Eh 






oo ci O -r -r iff co 

in © c i ~ ci i- — i 

© ift — © i- m 

co t-i © ire — ifi i, j 



M iff 



■* t- Ci 



to © to 



© © © — 



Iff 


-r- 


tH 


■<* 


t- 


© 


to 


■CI 


Cl 


rH 


CO 


ire 


-T 


© 


© 


tH 


i— ( 


© 


rH 


© 


CO 


CO 


T 


CO 


r-^ 


© 


rH 


H 


tH 


rH 


tH 


T-t 




rH 


H 


rH 


r-< 


rH 




© 


CO 


CO 


00 


C- 


t~ 


© 


eo 


© 


ci 


iff 


OO 


t- 


rH 


© 


Cl 


© 


Cl 


© 


t- 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


H 


© 


© 


© 


i-l 


-f 


00 


CO 


Cl 


c J, 




CI 


CO 


SO 


*c 






t- 


CO 


OO 


© 


oo 


© 


CO 


GO 


CI 


i-l 


© 


Lff 


© 


f 


-h 


to 


t- 


00 


© 


00 


00 


© 


OO 


© 


tH 


r " ' 


rH 


7-1 


rH 


'""' 


rH 


r-i 


H 


Cl 


rH 


rH 


OO 





© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CI 


OO 




© 


© 


-n 


Cl 


© 


00 


to 


-f 


CI 


t- 


© 




© 


OO 


to 


CO 


CO 


CI 


t- 


CO 


H 


Cl 


rH 




© 


OO 



OO 


— 


o 


© 


-, 


^ 


_ 


Cl 


_, 


© 




© 


-t< 


CI 


© 


00 


© 


"-" 


Cl 


t- 


© 


© 


© 




© 


CO 


CO 


CI 


L~ 


oo 


i—i 


C1 


T— 


rH 


iff 


OO 


-^ 


Iff 


CO 


-t. 


.~ 


iff 


© 


Iff 


CI 


CO 


CO 


OO 


CI 


55 


-f 


-r 


t> 


3 


t- 


© 


CO 


Cl 


f 


-r 


© 


© 


OO 


oo 


iff 


© 


© 


© 


©■ 


oo 


© 


Cl 


CO 


C~ 


Iff 


CO 


-H 


© 


t- 


"* 


00 


oo 


CO 


© 


Cl 


L^ 


00 


o 


Cl 


© 


i— i 


— H 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


"*l 


CO 




co 


"T 


-r 1 




-V 


-r 1 


-H 


CO 


00 


© 





© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©> 


© 


© 


© 


© 


C2 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


Lff 


Iff 


o 


Lff 


© 


Iff 


Iff 


© 


iff 


iff 


© 


© 


© 


-r 


© 



© © © 



iff iff rH 



© © L- 



Iff 


© 


Iff 


Iff 


© 


Iff) 


iff 


© 


© 


© 


"* 


© 


© 


oo 


Cl 


Iff 


*-r 


rH 


iff 


rH 


Cl 


© 


Cl 


OO 


Iff 


t> 


© 


i— ! 


t- 


-H 


Cl 


to 


© 


*-H 


© 


Cl 


© 


© 


© 


Iff 


r^ 


Cl 


Cl 


© 


00 


■* 


-Hi 


© 


t- 


^H 


,_( 


-f 


l- 


t- 


CO 


X 


Iff 


© 


© 


T 


©> 


— H 


© 


'© 


C~- 


t- 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


rH 


^ 


'H 


t-H 


^^ 


1-1 


rH 


rH 


Cl 


rH 


'—' 


oo 


© 


© 


© 


o 


^> 


© 


C 1 


CO 




© 


© 


--* 


C 1 


to 


OO 


© 


-f 


Cl 


t- 


©■ 




© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


Cl 


t- 


r 


H 


Cl 


rH 




© 


CO 



— r^ t- 

00 © rH 
rH Ol © 



3 J-i CJ S 



72 rj 0> p r - 



>? if- 



4> ~ 



h >' C £ ^ ft 



<H 



o 


0) 


<D 




K* 


a 


CJ 


o 


0) 


C 


r? 


ft 



fa 




o 




H 




GO 


CO 


o 


ON 


Q 


K 


£ 


< 


<J 


fa 




JH 


G 




fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


2 


H 


fa 


r»j 


fa 


£ 


>H 


fa 


H 


fa 




Q 


£ 


75 


< 


55 


fa 

a 


O 


fa 




fa 




fa 


fa 


p 


«! 


7} 


fa 


fa 
o 


fa 

> 

fa 


fa 


CO 


o 


rfi 


fa 
fa 

O 


fa 


go 


H 


o 


-^ 




O 


£ 


£ 



u fa 

tc ^ 

« fa 

fa fa 

fa 







1 


1 


> 


+ 




j 


+■ 




1 




1 4- 




3 G 


<M C75 t> »+. 00 




! © 




H 




n oc 




53 


f Uf 00 00 ^ 




oo 




© 






^3 


T' 00 i^p »ti t~ 






O-J 




©* 








iH Ol oo t-I '"" , 




00 




OO 




H-> 


<u 


























73 


Ah 


























o 




























O 
































f o M h t" 




■* 


H 


^1 00 




w 


T-H ^, C5 l— 1 © 




! © 


OO 


oo o-i 




"d 


° l» '-i oi sri 




© 


Ttl 


0\1 *^ 




+j 


^ r-H rH ^ 


-1 o 




«o 


L.O 


-« C<1 




o 


$30,2 

4,0 

24,3 

30,9 

89,4 




© 
! oo 


00 


© 




en 




























G 


t- 00 00 © 00 oc 




m 


lO 


t~- OO 




O 


© id Tt 


© © ICT 




-t 1 


M< 


© L.O 




03 S 


Tf 00 Ov 


°. *" 


oo 




t^ 


t- 




00 




73 - «3 


© ff 


c- 


t- \a <c 




00 


OO* 


^ 1 


* ©* 




ITS t 


oc 


© © LC 




T 


T 1 


UO T 




o 


00 T» 


OO © tH 00 




b- 


t- 


OO T 






























E -1 02 


eo c 


<x. 


OO © T 




■<*i 


■f 


eo © 




© ** 


te 


00 00 oa 




so 


^3 


© T 






© r- 


© 




t- 


I- 




© rH 


a; 
ca" 


D 


* 






of -t 


<0) 




01 


Ol 


Ol 


83 






























£ 


iStH — 
.5 o > G 




oo 
irt 






oc 




















00 






00 




















•H i. G 






























03 


Distribu 
Mains 

AW Se 
Syste 




© 

©" 






• © 


















1 




r-4 






T— 


















>> 


i-l 






























0, 


_ <u o 






oc 
























zz 


Cs , o 






** 
























co 


u c3 h ii 






a 
























O 


Q.SS | 






oc 

o<- 

oc 


) 
) 






















<D 

a 
O 


— — O nJ 






i£ 


















































w 


G +»_, 


t* 






c 




© 
















<v+j <v y 


C" 






c 




© 






















05 






c 




© 




















Q^i! 


in 






c 




© 




















CI- 






a 




© 






















SC 






0^ 

oc 




00 

oo 




















© 






c 




© 






















o~ 






c- 




Ol 
































'C 
































h 










* 






















d 
































> 










■a 






















8) 










c 




0. 






























to 






a 


a 








G 


a; 






a 

c 






cd 






c 


c 








O 


c 






0) 










> 


> 








> 






> 

!- 
01 
EC 

hi 


o 




g 




G 
o 
+-> 

CO 


5- 
0! 

co 

c 


a 

CO 


) 






o 
hi 


CO 

1i 






CO 

rl 

» to 

s 




G 

Ah 

0) 

o 




be 


h2 

1 


w 






a 




X 






5 




> 
o 




G 


+3 

0J 

0) 






(- 


hi 


) 




to 


C 


o 




CO 




G 


u 






> 








C8" 


(1) 


03 


7" 


fc 




h 


CO 




If 


a 


£ 


G 




g 

G 


> 


> 


0^ 


s 










% 
£ 


c 
PQ 


rt 


G 


0) 


Ah 


t 


G 
O 


M 


H-> 

O 






co 




5- 


-M 

o 










0) 


o 

o 


O 






+J 
a: 

03 




^ 




h 


3 


A 


-M 


4-> 


O 


■^ 













"3 


Ah 




03 


S3 




~^- 






£ 




o 


O 




0) 






c 


o 




c 








a 


H 




Q 








O 


O 




C" 





The following tables, showing the performance of the en- 
gines, depth and quantity of water in the Beacon Street Reser- 
voir and Christian Street Reservoir, average temperature of the 
air and water at the Christian Street Reservoir, and the average 
monthly and daily consumption of water, have been calculated 
and compiled from the records kept by the engineers and gate- 
keeper. 



w 

X 

I — I 

co 



GO 

rH 



CO jv; 
<^ H 

W « 
^ Q 

a h 

<c o 

w 

a 

i 

CO 

iJ 
<1 



<5 



CJ 






5 

o 



o 
o £ 






o 

CO 



•J CO 

W 



5 m 

els" 2 w in 

>, U § 3 cfl C 

Q o o"0 o >_ 
■m u o^ o 
c 



-F <5 S c o ,„ w 

>>£- P. SXJ TO. 5 

3 OX!— &<1J ~T 

I -^o^o C 



OT ' in'O r/i . w 

•£Coft— ofc 

O, 3-*^ « u O P 

2^ a.2 a ~ B 



g&'O* o 

T* -~ ~> <X> tf\ 

<6^ h 






-I- 1 Q O _ ( 

C c H " r 



a* a 



p 



« ° 2 2 a H 



VM 0) 0) g 

o^-a o 

a) 

a 



'c/j 



be 
o co — .53 

o § g a o 



CD ' & ^ 

2 ° 3 a' 

<u o' o S >- 

< a, a 



ra 5 c 



2-° 



Dh 



<c in 



CO CD CD so 



o t ^ 



CVJ CO 



<** CO CO 



Oi T-1 CO 



•> t- 



h cu 5 £ 



CD 

be 

>0 ai 

c 
+j 

G 



o 

> H 
ft £ 

w o 

w < 
o w 

ffiO 



00 

On 

ft 



ft <J bH 
O ^H 

£ 00 ^ 












w 

o 
g 

w & § 

M 

l-M 

CO 

-J 

«, 



-clB^ 5, 

rt 3 "i-E. C 

003^5 













■a 


B) 


u 


— 




. re 


oj 




'LI 


DJD O 


E 

a 

CO 

C 


o 


"4-1 


a 

e 

3 


1-, 
O 


— u 

i — . 


Z 


O 


a 




o 




u 










cfl 






V 


>*-o 


c S 
a o 






be 


*2 


u 


^— 






Ih 




a 
E 








> 


1 


3 








<Q , < 1 « 


a 












P 





w 

+J £• o - £ 
e g g£0 



0) "" c 
M-ci.S o « 



^ O ^ <" *-■ 
dOrt«jC 



•zi E 



d£ g 



bo 

^ w-S •£ 
° 3 a u c 

^ Oh 



g faft'0 
® d o S jh 



< 



Pl, a 








i^5 


CO 


00 


H 


T-l 


lO 


CO 


© 


© 




T-l 


t- 




o 


CO 


CO 


L.T 


oc 


©) 


t- 


1- 


© 


1 - 


OC 


© 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


os 


CI 


OO 


© 


ri 


rH 


r— 


© 


■"* 




^H 


«f 


ci> 


CM 


-f 


CO 


CI 


e 1 





CO 





oc 


f 


'S* 


rj< 


"tfl 


■^ 


'Jl 


CO 


ITS 


ut 






-T 


'" 


H 


H 




o 


H 


© 


co 


■rt< 




© 


© 


T-l 


H 


CO 


i-r 


10 


<M 


ITS 


ITS 


TJ< 


m 


,— 




I. 0' 


ITS 


CI 


C^J 


<M 


CI 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CI 


CJ 


C-l 


CI 


H 


CO 


H 


o 


os 


lO 


CO 


© 




© 


^^ 


t- 







co 




o 


© 


^r 


co 




© 


co 


CO 


CI 




OJ 


c 


CO 


CM 


H 


1-1 




CO 


© 


~ 


I- 


oc 


C-5 


H 


o 


CO 


t- 


OS 


© 


tft 


g) 


10 


CO 


T— 


* 


ira 


t> 


CS 


oc 


■^r 


© 


tH 




-r 


lO 


T 


l> 


/I 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 




■^ 


T 


rr 


CO 


(M 


00 






© 


T 1 


o 


TSH 


© 




© 


•Jf 


00 


-j' 


co 




OS 


CO 


© 




lO 


OS 


O 


co 


L.0 


no 




r^ 


(M 


•^ 


CO' 


00 


H 


oc 


'-. 


© 


•ro 


CO 


C3 


tJ< 


,_( 




CO 


•^ 


lO 


CM 





© 


C". 


CO 


OS 




H 


cr> 




© 


t- 




© 


»— 


© 


© 




f 




Tf 




"* 


t^ 


© 


«r> 


CM 


Ci 


^ 


CO 


lO 


"^ 


o 


O 


H 




© 


tH 




CO 


CO 


Tf 


CO 




© 

T-l 


LO 


Lt 


N 


CM 


C5 


CI 


00 


<M 


CM 


OC 


CI 


CI 


in 


00 


CO 


r^ 


H 


© 


■n- 


CO 


OO 


00 


CI 


H 


tr- 


T-l 


t- 


l- 


OS 


OS 


,_( 


-r 


,— 


O 





CI 


t- 


io 


w 


o 


IC 


CO 


o 


■* 


© 


OO 


O 





CO 


© 


00 


© 


o 


o 


CI 


1— 1 


OC 


© 


00 


CM 


CM 


fc- 


m 


CO 


oc 


CO 




CO 


© 


CI 


CO 


CO 


H 


OC 


L.0 


T- 


■•St 




t- 


3C 


oc 


OS 


oc 


OS 


t.r. 


T—l 


r-4 


CI 


C1 


OO 


© 








" 


H 


T-l 


rH 


CM 


CM 


CI 


CM 


IH 




ro 


t- 




H 






Lft 


r^ 


LO 


© 


IO 


T-l 


I- 

OS 

© 


Lt 


iS 


ro 


t- 


e*j 


C] 


■rr 


tH 




L 


"— 


— -\ 


C^ 


oc 


CI 


co 


oc 


© 


OC 


f-*l 


© 




© 


T— 


CI 


^T 


CO 


I- 


^_" 


oc 


^,* 


© 


CO 


CO 


L- 


© 


CO 


CO 


uT 


-r 


Oi 


CI 


© 


OS 


oc 


-r 


**• 


5£ 


LT 


CI 


© 


L~ 


t- 


I- 


oc 


L^ 


t- 


1© 


OS 




-' 




oc 


© 

T— 


























CM 


09 


co 


lit 


© 


o 


' ' 


T-l 


t*< 


© 


-r 


OO 


*?fl 


CO 


CO 


o 


(M 


Ol 


c 


oc 


Tf 


T 1 


CJ 


■rt- 


© 


>* 


uo 


SO 


«5 


t> 


t- 


l- 


© 


t- 


t- 


L- 


t- 


t- 


L- 


00 


c; 


c 


CO 




L.t 


CM 










© 




m 


LC 


CO 


(M 




co 


•<9- 










CO 






IM 


i 

CO 


CO 


1 

"3" 


i 

CM 


CM 


TJ" 


1 


1 
T9> 


T 


CO 


1 
«*l 


CO 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CJ 


CM 


CM 






























O 


OC 


© 


H 


H 


© 


r— 


T" - 


O 


t— 


© 


T-i 




CO 


?4 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


"'•' 


CO 




















•: 






■T-J 05 


















0> 







<v 


Z :t 


t». 


3 












-4-J 


— 


t. 






"" oj 


rt 


^ 


o 


s 


X 


OJ 


^> 




z 


0) 


'r* 


O 


Totals 
Avei 


* 


0; 


§ 


< 




^ 


1-5 


< 


CO 







£ 





>^ 


u 


^ ° 2? 

o n 5 


> 


C-t 


C-4 


t? 1 

— . 


4> 


— 


4 


en 




< o 


CD 




*~> 


C 


p 


a 


P 


$L 






o 
CD 


5 o <■+ 

ra !l ■ 


(JQ 


"<f 


3 

CD 


^ 


>s 


iw 


►3 


K 




3 
cr 


3 CD 


w 
Pt- 










3" 




P 


o 


w 2 


CD 


CD 




. 










# 


^ 






to 

OO 








• 










■ 




: 




to 


H* '. 


to 


CO 


4-1 


co 


co 


M 


to 


to 


CO 


3 fa D3 O 


ro 


c* 


OO 


CJ 


H 


-3 


© 


r- 1 


OO 


OS 


00 


l-i 




























c ^d > 


to 

CO 


to 

CO 


to 


to 
to 


to 

co 


to 
to 


to 

4k 


to 

4- 


to 
to 


to 

CO 


to 

4k 


to 

4*k' 


<T5 d _r2!< 
^ 3 o o cd 


to 

to 


1— 1 


to 


CO 


Cn 


4— 


i 


1 


44. 




1 




S 5" co S>tTQ 


© 


© • 


CO 


4* 


to 






CO 


~] 































^ (jq <V 
























5 


os 

Cn 


OS 


CO 


en 


-1 


CO 


-J 


-J 


44. 


OS 


OS 


-a 


2 d 4T55 


CO 


o 


oo 


oo 


4k 


oo 


to 


4k 


© 


© 


-1 


tt^ 


Ci 


en 


4k • 


CD 


h 1 


© 


© 


4k 


CO 


H* 


to 


4- 


























— 3 Cfl .-►, 


























era 


H 1 


























o 




" " 




l-» 






M 






M 


M 


t>" M y 


^u 


© 


en 


OS 


M 


en 


OO 


M 


-J 


CO 


4k 


4k 


5 ®s° 


uU 


-i 


d . 


co 


© 


to 


00 


to 


M 


oo 


oo 


cn 


CO 

en 


os 

"to 


CO , 
4k 


H 

CO 


to 

00 


4- 

en 


CO 
CO 


OS 

en 


CO 

© 


4- 

to 


-J 
to 


4- 
OS 


00 


CO 


© ' 


© 


4- 


00 


I- 1 


CO 


to 


4- 


Cn 


oo 


to 


Cn 


© 


to 


OO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 


to 


























^ „ M >•> ^ 

q - ^ g ^ O CD 

C -s r'^Q P 


to 


to 


to . 


H 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


co 


CO 


o 
co 


OS 
00 
CO 


4- 
© 

to 


bo 

© 


4- 
OO 
© 


to 

OS 

en 


© 
— 
en 


en 
to 

4- 


CO 
CO 

© 


-1 

to 

© 


OS 
OO 
00 


to 

en 

© 


M 


H 


M * 


M 


M 


l-» 


M 


4-1 


4-1 


M 


M 


4-1 


H,2. " p ^ 


-J 
to 


© 


-J 

CO 


OO 

© 


OO 

to 


-j 
^ 


OO 

en 


-J. 

-1 


<t> 


OS 

4k 


OS 

co 


cn 


oo 


OS 


CO 


H* 


pj 


4k 


to 


to 


*CO 


© 


*oo 


CO 


CD CT. ^^P 


OS 


M 


en 


en 


© 


H 


-J 


© 


CO 


OS 


cn 


to 


2- ° 5' ^ 


os 
























a 


OS 


OS 


CO 


0- 


-5 


co 


en 


-J 


44. 


© 


© 


CO 


5*5 3§ 

3 a p 


CO 
00 


to 


en 

►4- 


© 
4- 


© 

en 


co 
en 


OS 

en 


to 

4-1 


OS 
© 


to 

CO 


en 
h-i 


CO 

© 


CO 


OO 


H» 


© 


OO 


-J 


CO 


© 


l-i 


CO 


OO 


CO 


"to 


to 


-3 


. -J 


to 


CO 


M 


M 


-3 


4-1 


4k 


CO 


P ? a 3 


►i* 


oo 


OS 


M 


to 


H 


00 


•<1 


to 


"co 


CO 


OS 




oo 


OO 


© 


OS 


^1 


to 


*— 


OS 


OO 


OS 


to 


»kk 


►— M. ■_, Pt 1 




o 


© 


00 


to 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


3 i-s 


















































72 


to 


to 


M 


l-» 


to 


h-» 


M 


to 


to 


to 


CO 


CO 


C TJ 


CO 


4k 


CO " 


en 


to 


CO 


00 


CO 


en 


44. 


co 


© 


(^CL3^> 
" a) "- 1 *-' * 


-1 


© 


OS 


en 


<i 


-J 


oo 


to 


en 


to 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 


r 1 


4- 


OS 


•C 


4- 


en 


OS 


to 


CO 


CO 


/-s^. T3 03 Ct> 
t » J ^ fD 3 '-I 


M 


M 


OS 


(- 1 


00 


OO 


CO 


00 


en 


<I 


4k 


to 


W 3-d.rt W 
O ^ << CD 

3 2 


-J 


OO 


►u 


to 


4k 


OO 


CO 


OS 


M 


4-.' 


4- 


4-1 


CI 


00 


4- 


to 


-J 


CO 


en 


CO 


en 


en 


© 


en 


to 


to 


M 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


3 o — ^ co o g ^ =:0 
n ? g -S'a'o » o _ 


to 


© 


oo 


to 


© 


© 


to 


4k 


en 


4k 


CO 


to 


Oi 


© 


~J 


to 


OS 


to 


© 


-J 


© 


oo 


© 


oo 




























CO 


L» 


to 


CO 


co 


to 


co 


CO 


co 


CO 


co 


IO 


3 ^ 


to 


"* 


-J 


CO 


4-1 


© 


4- 


OS 


4- 


4- 


to 


CO 


^ O O ^ — _t H 

2- cd - cr 3" Z 3 5. 

3 7! C £ • <* ^^ 


4k 

OS 




© 
^1 


CO 


CO 

© 


CO 

oo 


© 
44. 


CJ1 

4-i 


OO 

© 


© 
to 


OS 
-3 


CO 

to 


ea 


00 


M 


M 


oo 


CO 


© 




© 


-1 


oo 


oo 


CO 




OS 


co 


00 


en 


CO 


to 


OS 


4-1 


CO 


CO 


W S - O 7J ^. < _, 


1-1 


©" 


© 


-1 


Cn 


to 


CO 


|-i 


4-1 


© 


4k 


oo 


"* K O —' r+ Z? 


to 


oo 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


H» 


CO 


en 


h-» 


671 


OS 





























H 




> 




W 


^d 


r 


a « 


S 


C/3 


H 


o 


Q 


^ 




HH 


CO 


5^ 


H 


Q 


P> 




H 


^ 


H 

o 

2! 


O 

w 


^3 


a 


O 


o 


W 


21 


w 


ts 


> 

n 


3 


W 




s* 


M-i 

H-I 


►—• 




o 


d 


2 


w 


H > 


W « 


a 


ft 


a w 


W 2 


25 




Q 5 


►3 


ft 

C/3 




> 




^3 


H^ 


n 


tt 


o 


P> 


o 


PO 


W 


>— » 




vO 


^ 


CO 


ft 




ft 




r 




(73 



v ° 
< P= 

pa .. 



J — . 



►J CT — ~ •_< 

g 2 fi 5 

p 3 -r 






5 * 



3 fe 



" 0) 



W CO CO 10 



CO CO CO CO CO tO 



M to 



© -1 



a c a? 



« = -o < 

W 3 ^ 

Vj to, o 



3 OtJ 3 ' 
rt- -S >-■ hj O 



J-* 


-a 


i; 


ea 


OC 


-J 


OC 


h- ' 


M 


OS 


o 


A. 


■J 


© 


cn 


© 


CO 


CI 


-1 


h- 1 


© 


h^ 


-3 


-o 


cn 


■q 


to 


to 


oc 


o 


oo 


— 


-1 


l~* 


os 


-a 


Cn 


to 


H 


o 


o 


CO 


-q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 



2 






3 i-S ^ W 



rc^ 2. 



cn cn cn cn 



cn cn cn cr» 



00 00 cs 






3 W_> 

3 3 ^-ZJ< 

3 a> P o • hj 
3 i &?T P 
^ » <d 3. TO 



h,3 



, CD 3 rt- « .0 "5 ; 



J&3 

^TO. ^ 



cniTsmciCTsisscncn cn cn 



5' 3 B 3 

?! C"rt 

3: 3^3; 

o ^" ^"^ 
3 3" 



W 3>Cfr> 
CD 3 3 < 

C 3 3 3 1 
P ^ Cu3 <fp 

S p 2 ^JQ 

C ^ -"< CD 

3 

02 



r 



ft 

ft 



> 

r 
ft 

a> 

Hi 

o 

52 



o o 

^ £0 

ft W 

to o 
c a ft 
5 w ^ 

K o fc 

uJ 5** P 

K 2 nd 
> "C ^ 

» 5 w 

s 2 m 

O H< 

- ft 

ft ^ 

S 2 

ft ^ 

£2 

o w 

So 



34 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

ALLIS-CHALMERS ENGINE AT PUMPING 

STATION, WEST SIXTH STREET, 

DURING THE YEAR 191S 







Coal Co 


isumecl 




Months 


For starting 

Fires, 
in Pounds 


When 

Pumping, 

in Pounds 


For Banking 

• Fires, 
in Pounds 


, Total 
-in Pounds 


January 


1000 


179,524 
148,109 
138,040 
194,040 
259,155 
298,489 
305,723 
251,773 
248,262 
242,859 
190,642 
172,397 




180,5 2 4 


February 




148,109 
138,040 


March 






April 






194,040 


May 






259,155 


June 


800 
800 




299,289 


July 




306,523 


August . ; 




251,773 


September 






248,262 


October 






242,859 


November 


800 




191,4 4 2 


December 




172,397 










Totals 


3400 


2.629,016 




2,632,416 









Gallons pumped per pound total coal consumed — 797. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



35 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

DEANE ENGINES AT PUMPING STATION, 

COOK WELLS, DURING YEAR 1918. 







Coal Consumed 




Months 


For starting 

Fires, 
in Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
in Pounds 


For Banking „ . . 
_,. Total 
Fires, ^ , 
_, , in Pounds 
in Pounds 


January 




408,292 
398,175 
253,385 
177,605 
291,948 
256,700 
165,700 
34 2,500 
182,315 




408,292 








398,175 
253,385 
177,605 
°91 948 


March 
























°56 700 


July 






165,700 


August 






September 






342,500 
182,315 
189,300 
303,100 


October 






November • 




189,300 
303,100 




December 












Totals 




2,969,020 




2,969,020 









Gallons pumped per pound of total coal consumed — 225. 



36 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

HOLLY ENGINE AND KERR TURBINE AT 

PUMPING STATION, LOWER BOUVLEVARD, 

DURING THE YEAR 1918. 





Coal Consumed 


Gals, pumped 

into couduit 

per lb. total 

coal consumed. 


Months 


For starting 

Fires, 
in Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
in Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

in Pounds 


Total 
in Pounds 






259,580 
263,350 
192,205 
217,670 
218,315 
211,180 
231,595 
210,410 
205,555 
270,005 
216,555 
2 32,590 




259,580 
263,350 
193,805 
217,670 
218,315 
212,180 
231,595 
211,410 
206,555 
270,005 
248,055 
233,590 


644 








535 


March 


1600 




830 






751 








803 


June 


1000 




829 


July 




826 




1000 
1000 




877 


September 




883 






749 


November 


1500 
1000 




715 






694 








Totals 


7100 2.759.010 




2,766,110 


753 













REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 37 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, ALLIS-CHALMERS 
ENGINE RUNNING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 1918. 

Pay of Engineers and Firemen $13,916.71 

29 627-2240 tons (1917) coal at $11.00 322.08 

425 00-2240 tons (1918) coal at $11.27 4,789.65 

809 700-2000 tons (1918) coal at $11.49 9,293.68 

Engine Repairs 72.55 

Boiler Repairs 406.93 

Elec. Engine Repairs 102.48 

Supplies 942.64 

Sundries 313.42 

Total $30,220.14 

Cost of pumping water into reservoir, per million gallons, $14.S2 — 
Cost of pumping water 1 foot high, per million gallons, $0.0S 00/100 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, HIGH SERVICE 
ENGINE RUNNING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 1918. 

Pay of Engineers and Firemen $ 932.53 

6 426-2240 tons of coal (1917) ) at $11.00 68.11 

89 1449-2240 tons of coal (1918) at $11.27 1,012.83 

171 320-2000 tons of coal (1918) at $11.49 1,965.45 

Supplies 36.48 

Total $4,015.40 

Cost of pumping water into reservoir, per million gallons, $2S.59 — 
Cost of pumping water 1 foot high, per millions gallons, $0.43 88/100 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



COOK WELLS PUMPING STATION. DEANE ENGINES 
RUNNING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 1018. 

Pay of Engineers and Firemen $8,495.88 

45 .147-2240 tons of coal (1917) at $10.75 486.61 

738 440-2240 tons of coal (1918) at 810.62 7.844.49 

607 650-2000 tons of coal (1918) at $10.60 6.440.84 

Engine Repairs 82.74 

Boiler Repairs 500.44 

Supplies 232.29 

Sundries 228.64 

Total $24,311.93 

Cost of pumping water into distributing mains, per million gallons, 

$36.37 + 
Cost of pumping water 1 foot high, per million gallons. $0.21 03/100 



LOWER BOULEVARD PUMPING STATION, HOLLY ENGINE AND 

KERR TURBINE RUNNING ENPENSES FOR 

THE YEAR 1918. 

Pay of Engineers and Firemen $13 S21.S0 

60 00-2240 tons of coal (1917) at $11.00 660.00 

462 780-2240 tons of coal (1918) at $12.08 5.587.07 

788 740-2000 tons of coal (1918) at $11.27 8,889.05 

Engine Repairs 389.78 

Boiler Repairs 696.35 

SuppHes 797.55 

Sundries 80.07 

Total $30,922.17 

Cost of pumping water into conduit, per million gallons. $14.S4 — 

Cost of pumping water 1 foot high, per million gallons, $0.25 7/10 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



39 



BEACON STREET RESERVOIR. 





Depth 

in 
Feet 


Quantity 

in 

U. S. Gallons 


Te-nperature in Degrees 


Months 


Of Water 


Of Air 


March 


16.04 
15.30 
15.09 
17.26 
IS. 53 
18.53 
IS. 51 
IS. 85 
20.01 
19.52 
IS. 03 
19.14 


23.9S1.4S8 
22.795.54 6 
22,446,830 
25,942,443 
28,053,661 
28,053,661 
28,001,761 
28,590,9 64 
30,514,527 
29,706,897 
27,225,859 
29,566,912 


31.2 
30.0 
32.4 
41.9 
57.6 
6 2.2 
66.4 
66.5 
66.7 
52.0 
4 2.0 
36.9 


18.4 
24.3 
34.9 


April 


46.4 


May 


63.4 


June 


65.0 


July 


71.8 


August 


67.6 


September 


59.8 
53.2 
40.9 
30.6 



40 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



CHRISTIAN STREET RESERVOIR. 







Quantity 


Temperature in Degrees 


Months 


Elevation 


in 










U. S. Gallons 


Of Water 


Of Air 






















March 










April 




May 27d 


204.01 


3,363,650 


42.3 


63.4 


June 30d 


204.45 


3,462,989 


45.2 


65.0 


July lSd 


206.31 


3,816,725 


46.5 


71.8 




204.90 


3,544,454 


51.0 


67.6 


September 30d . . 


206.65 


3,901,810 


61.2 


59.8 


October 13d 


196.44 


1,817,235 


56.0 


53.2 


November 21d . . . 


196.44 


1,817,235 


53.7 


40.9 


December 27d ... 


203.72 


3,304,090 


55.5 


30.6 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



41 



TABLE SHOWING THE AVERAGE MONTHLY 

AND DAILY CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

FOR THE YEAR 1918. 



Months Gallons per month 


Gallons per day 




256,366,135 

236,023,283 
219,712,781 
200,905,510 
' 246,357,714 
24 2,791,513 
233,471,076 
252,188,391 
223,115,757 
207,200,861 
210,753,718 
224,502,021 


8,269,875 




8,429,403 
7,087,509 






6,696,850 




7,947,023 




8,093,050 




7,531,325 




8,135,109 




7,437,192 




6,683,899 




7,025,124 




7,243,936 






Totals and Averages. 


2,753,448,760 7,544,243 



The following table shows the average daily consumption 
of water, in gallons, for each month and each year since the 
installation of the system. 



O 
- > 



o 


(A 


< 


U 


w 


J 




U 


£ 


55 


o 


i— i 


fa 


*, 




CO 


m 


C^ 


Z 


pH 


o 


« 


"1 

r— ' 


K 


J 


W 


< 


03 


o 


s 




H 


z 


o 


►— 1 


w 


& 


Q 


< 


o 


£ 






t>- 




CO 


Ex. 


rH 


O 


^ 




►« 


Z 


K 


o 


< 


KH 


£> 


j— < 


£ 


P-l 


<3 


p 


r— 1 


C/3 


**U 


£ 


o 


o 


tt 


(J 


to 


►* 


K 


r— 1 


< 


< 


>H 


Q 






Q 


W 


Z 


O 


< 


<! 




K 




CxJ 




> 




< 





i_ 4> 

to 



> 
o 



co 



bo 
< 



< 



c i — ©^©©©t-ooifl© 



©© 

-r ftl 



r49CM« M X N '-ft ~ ~' - — — 

u - t ~ <?) tt — C- — N M <* x © ifl 

r-*r*r-*'— oioioicicircco 



© -r X io ©> (M co to © oi oc -^ -r i n ' c 

Lfl C - 'J « J. - -f I- ff! O '— O ~ > ~ 

© r- i—< ,— i o © o i © rH © co oe f.r nc: 

t- ©iH co co"©*rr © x ou ro •+■ — x 00 

uft rH or. co i - ,_ i - 1— -x :ik*. >i oo © 
© co cr. © co © © oc ift © © >o t- e i x 
co -p"^ -r- iff l( f -x © © © © © © i - 1 - 



oi © © © © ■ — © © — 

© OJ © r- Ol ift — ' 



flCU""/ ' 






lO X uft^x L * > 3C . H . L ; T ". <; .- ! 

r-"r>VrHriflM 









© 


© 


©© 


— 


ri-^c 


© 


© 


T— © 


— 


Cft 


«S"t- 


01 


© 


CO -r 


© 


* 


Cft Ift 








Ol OC CO 00 


_ 
























X 


X 


© — 








^* 


— * 


X uft 




i- 


— c-i 


CI 


co 


— r- 








o i 


oi 


Ol CO 



-r -j. i r. x © oc co 

O H CC r- rji h tt 

ift © © cr. xc-n: 

x ©*r- © »r*co"© ift © © t cc i-. x -*• 
Lft iH tH © «0 Ift"* 
ft © -JC OC CO lft t-i oc oc © , o 

-* -T-' m ■* © , (j i.o t- © t- © © © © C" 



© OC I'- OJ t- 00 'ft © 

ifl t— © « -o os ^ >ft 
ce '— oo n oo eo © in -z- 



© oc ro © i - c i 



- - -© 

© i- ~i 



'— — — 

r- — . — 

"•^.ft'ift" 






© — © 0C ft X I- I- I- © 



<-; — " —' Ct © Lft © © C-1 i— -*> 0C Lft © Ol Ol © — r- CO © 






— © r ■ i - © :ii - 

O© ~; c =.-; - : 34 

©'c''— *CC. X3 I ' 
©- ift© M 9 
© CO © Tf iH t" 



© r- ift 

CO CO I O 

it»a c: 

00 tH Co" 

~ I - T- 

1 - 1-- © 



r. M M 0-1 OJ Ol CO CO 



l.o © ift © © © i - ift> »r -f 



cm©©©©©©©©C©©C:©occooccc-. -r©©©t~-©ift©^ftt-©ococ 

7 1 © -X. ~S. — : © CO CT © 00 © CO OC Ift "-r -rr t~ ~ L.0 CO r- Lft © © OO i-H t— © GO r-i O I 

© l.0 o-i co oc — co — l — - i— r- oc -r ^-oc — ift © c-i ift © oi ©^©_©^©_or-^ jo -r 

i- r~" t> 0C*r-*CO*©*x"Lft"-r " OC* ©" t- ©* TT OC ©*— t-© Lft r- -^ © T-H © L- © CO t - © 

KCrHTC-CL-CCfCCOCn-t HOC^r©rH01t>l.-©©COOCoC©© 

ift t- r- co l.0 © © oi oi »r -r oc l.0 ■*- co co co co t- c-j^-r oc ^ cr ; fC . v c ; fc , , ~l r ^. r - , 
t-Tt— "r- i— r- oTc-fof o-i oi co co co -r^L." in© ©U5«om©<o t> t-©in^i 



r- © © © Lft X © © © © © © © © CTi © Lft © CO -T r- l> © © «S Si t" — © ^' Lft 
Ol cr • t~- CO t- — Lft ^- © ^. •«> t— Ol ift -r r^ © Ol t> L- © [> CO © t- r^ t-> CO CO Lft 7 i 
© ZC — 77 © © © CT. Ol Lft -r- 9: © © © © t- Lft Lft CO I- CO © OC r- r-_©_0C_00 lft © 
r- ©* oc* ©T ©" >: '/Xc'r-C; t— CO Oft ©"l - OC*' - ©"— -c- © Cft t- OC CO Ol OC — t- © 
Lft OC Ol Lft © XC. ^r CO © © r- O ©_01 CO © ©_r- °^.h- t- r- ^r- 00_l> © ^r- l.O^— 3> 
rH -r-* rH*T-*rH* 01*01*01*01* CO* CO* CO* -rr TT^r" Lft ©*© © © t> © © © t- OC © Lft — - 



Tr©©©©©©©©©©©©©©OC© — OC rn r- CO © n CC C- OC •— Ol©0C 
7~. 7 1 t> 01 © I- T CO CO OC OC © ©. r- -r OC L- " ©. Lft Ol Cft -f Ol Lft — Ol Ol (.- ,_ — 
«S OC © © C~ © CO CO OC © t> Lft t— © -T- 77 © © © 01^© © -T t- w.^© 1-h Lft t- ©^ oi_ 
OC ^©"cToC* CO*©* 01*01* ©"©*©* Cft01*©*©*©r^ft L-"©*©"r-"cO*OC CO © © OC © 7 7 X 



VI 




X 




H 


<D 


i5 


C 


O 


3 


2 


>—) 




>> 




a 





- 


rH 


- 


- 


Ol Ol Ol CO CO Oft 


CO Oft 


— 


- 


^ 1 


Lft 


- 


» 


© ©' o t^ © © t> X 


© 


Lft 


Lft 


ift © © © 

T— © © — 

Ol CO Lft © 


t> 


Lft 


©©©©©©©©"H"COoCHr©[>©COl>Lft 
t> OC OC T OC Ol Ol t- © ©. © Ol ©. CO CO Lft oc © 
r- © Ol © t— 'T © r- © © © L^ r- t- Lft HT Lft © 


© OC © © Ol 

CO Ol Ol r- Oft 
Ol X Ol r- Cft 


© I- 


© t^ 

CO E- 

oc © 


JZ 

CO 


r- t- 
© t- 


Ol 


Oft OC CO © OC lft 
CO Oft'OC Ol oc oc 
r- HT CO Ol © r- 


Lft 

lft 


X 

© 


Ol 
Ol 
Lft 


X 
X 


r 


zz 


_ 


L- 


©. © CO © 
f-r-C-r 


X TT© © 

X T— © © 


ro 

7 


X 

© 


Lft 




'- 


CM 


T " 


1 Ol Ol 0-1 CO Ol CO CO 


r - 


— 


— 


— 


© 








© t~ X X l- 


© 


Lft 



©©©— •CO©©©©©©©©©©©CO©i— t^r-LftLftt~-©Xr-C0 01t-01 
t- X t— t- r- Cft Lft C- CO Ol ©. CO t— X Lft T- © ©. r- CO t> CO CO Ol t- © r- ©. CO r- rr 
OS©rr"rr"©*©TH © i— *rr*C- C- CO CO*© © X*—*© — * ©*L.ft*Cft*C0*© ol*X l>*C0*t-"r-* 
?-; r- r- lft X © © X X t- © Ol rr © © CO CO CO t> L~ CO r- CO ©. © i— © CO X r- Ol 
Lft © Oft lft t> L~ © rr Ol t- © r- rr © CO X t- Ol © CO CO © © © Ol © lft © © Ol rH 







r- 


— 


H 


- 


— 


01 01 Ol Ol CO CO Oft 


— 


rr 


rr Lft 


© 


© 


- 


©t>t>©©xxt-© 


Lft 


^_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


© 


~ 





- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


t- 


© 


X 


Ol 


© 


CO 


_ 


t^ 


OllftCO 


rv* 


^_ 


_ 


ft 1 





Ol 


© 


© 


t- 


X 


1- 


— 


Ift 


t- 


© 


X 


t- 


ft ] 


© 


X 


7 1 


Lft 


Ol t> 


© 


lft 


1- 


© 


r- X Lft 


r^ 


CO 


i — 


t- 


© 


Oft 


CO t~ l> 


— 


X 


— 


Ol 


— 


Lft 


lft 


© 


X 


lft 


Cft 


Cft 


— 


CO 


— 


© 


© 


X- 


ft' 


Ol © © 


rH 


L- 


© 


— 


— 


©. 


© 


X 


_ 


Lft 


Lft 


— 


© 


re 


ro 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CI 


r- 


© 


Ol 


© 


_ 


— 


— 


Ol rr r- 


lft 


— 


— 


© 


t> 


,_( 


00 


© 


© 


t- 


lft 


Ol 


CI Ol 


Ol 


© 


TT 


ft 1 


© 


1 — 


ft 1 


— 


— 


© 


re 


— 1 


, — 


lft 


Lft CO © 


© 


lft 


Oft 


y\ 


© 


X 


"* 


I- 


— 


Ol 


~~ 


X 


— 


01 


Ol 


Ol c- 


- 


-■ 




Ol 


ft l 


Ift 


- 


'" 


Ol 


© 


r ~. 


rr © rr 


"" 


ift 


t- 


ift 


t- 







- 


" 


r-l 


^ 


Ol Ol Ol 


Ol Ol Ol 


Ol 


JyJ 


rr rr 


— 


^ 


Lft lft 


lft 


© 


«r; 


t- 


© 


© © 


t>© 


Lft Lft 


X © © Ol © 


— 


© ©©© © 





- 


© © t- 


© 


©©©. 


© 


©co©xxcoxoi©co 


rr 


t-rn 


— 


Cft 


! — 


© ©CO 


© © 


— 


Lft 


© 


Lft rr 


ift 


rr 


X D- 


, — 


rn 


r- 


X 


© 


Ol © X oc 


rr Ol 


r- 


rrx 


© 


© 


CO 


© X CO 


© © 


E- 


Cft 


ift 


© CO 


L- 


C 1 


r- OC 


© 


X 


© 


© 


lft 


X © 


X © 


© rr 


© 


© © 


co 


H 


O © ©. CM CO © 


Cft 


ro 


© 


C~ CO 


© 


c- 


Ol © 




— 


r}< 


Cft 


t- 


Ol rr 


ift -r 


© t- 


lft 


© Ol 


1- 


© 


X 


r- CO Ol 


©CO 


, — 


© 


© 


© r— 


CO 


© 


© rr 


— 


. — 


CO Ol 


y. 


© lft 


© r- 


rr rr 


°s 


w «,. 


© 


Ol Ol 


t-X Ol 


rr rr 


Lft 


~ 


~ ' 


c- oi 




© 


OJ CO 




© 


© 


t- 


r ~ 


Ol Lft 


"~1~ 









- 


* 


H 


H 


H 


C1C1M 


Ol 


00 


71 


CO 


rr 


rr 


— 


l.ft 


lft 


Lft 


« 


- 


© 


© 


- 


© 


t- 


"° 


Lft 


Lft 


T— © 


- 


_ 


~ 


- 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


— 


© 


© 


— 


© 


^r 


rr 


lft 


rH 


rr 


C— © O-l rr x 


ftl 


uft 


Lft 


— 


X 


oi -r 


t- 


-n 


X 


© 


- ■" 


rH 


1 — 


© 


re 


rH 


© 


O Ol 


Ol 


© 


Ol 0<1 


© 


— 


rn 


CO 


© 


to 


© 


X 


1 — 


© 


— 


© 


cox 


Z: 


L- 


— 


© 


"T". 


— 


— 


Ol CO 


© 


X 


lft 


© 


re 


— 


Lft 


Ol 


lft 


T— 


t- 


© 


T— 


ftl 


© 


~- 


— 


X c- 


r- 


c-x 


7 1 


Lft 


Cft 


ro 


r^c^: 


lft 


CO 


Cft 


lO 


t~ 


CO 


© 


1 .- 


— 


t- 


X Cft 


X 


Q 


— 


I ft 


X 


ft 1 


Cft 


— 


© 


_ 


Lft 


01 CO 


© 


Ol rr X 


fM CC 


— 


© 


© 


ftl 


© 


1 — 


t- 


© 


— 


~- 


© 


ft 1 


— 


X © rr 


© 


CO 


© 


Ol 


© 


1 ft 


r^ 


CO © © 


CO 


— 


"— 


c^ 


- . 


O-l 


Ol X 


© 


© 


ft 1 


ft ] 


CO 


CO 


© 


— 


© 


© 


Lft 


— 


© rr 


Ol X 


© 


C 1 


© 


rH 




^ 


H 


^ 


^ 


- 


^ 


C1MC1 


Cft 


Cft 


T 


— 


lft 


r- Lft 


lft 


© 


© 


© 


- 


© 


© 


© 


© 


X X 


lft 


Lft 


L-© 


- 


- 


Ol 


- 


© 


© 


© 


- 


- 


- 


- 


© 


© 


,- 


OOC- 


© 


~ 


.- 


- 


_ 


CO 


t> 


m 


X 


- 


ft 1 


_ 


.- 


co c- x 


CO 


X 


© 


: : 


— 


lft 


— 


© 


01 


zr 


© 


lft 


rt 


Oft 


X 


ro 


Lft 


V 


© 


© 


© 


Cft 


© 


r— 


1 — 


r— 


© 


r^ 


r- C" 


X 


X 


X 


X 


— 


— 


lft 


lft 


© 


— 


© 


© 


© 


a 


— 


— 


© 


— 


lft 


© 


CO 


© 


00 


l- 


Ol 


-r 


r- 


X 


© 


Cft c- t> 


r- 


© 


— 


— 


— 


— 


© 


X 


1 1 


— 


l- 


CI 


L- 


1 ft 


t- 


© 


— 


r 


c- 


OC X 


© 


— 


rr 


t- 


, - 


— 


— 


L-© t> 


Ol 


1 — 


© 


-* 


rr 


Lft 


© 


© 


CO 


ftl 


C 1 


© 


o 


© 


— 


— 


.— 


X 


r 


rH 


t H 


lft 


— 


1 — 


ftl 


lft 


. — 


Lft 


co © 


CO 


lft 


'— 


X 


ft 1 


H 


© 


X 


ftft 


© 


© 


© 


t- 


L- 


— 


CO 


© 


© 


X 


X 


CO 


© 


© 


CI 


H 


— 


© 


— 


© 





- 


- 


" 


" 


Ol 71 CO Ol CO 


ro 


— 


rr rr © 


Lft 


I ft 


© 


© 


X 


t- X t- t> t- X X 


© 


© 


- 


t-© 


- 


— 


- 


- 


© 





- 


~ 


- 


c 


© 


~ 


© © t- 


— 


-r 


T _ 


© rr 


_ 


lft 


.. 


.- 


_ 


CO 


_ 


© © 


fcH — 


X 


r. 


© 


© 


Lft 


© 


X 


© 


lft 


lft 


00 




© 


t- 


1 — 


' — 


X X 


t- 


— 


X 


CO 


X 


. — 


rn 


© 


© 


0. 


•^ 


t-x 


— 


-■ 


- 


- 


-■ 


L- 


O-l 


Lft 


- 


r 


l> 


- 




Lt 


-■ 


™ 


Oi 


Ol 


X 


c- 


~ 




~" 


X 


l- 


r ~ 


- 


01 


a 



x co r- -ft- cft o: t- t- r- co i— 

CO © Ol -r © © rr © — X Cft 
r- r- — Ol Ol i— CO Ol CO 



© t- L~ © r- © 

©CO ft i l- r- X 

© rr Lft rr © OC 



r- © X © t- Ol © L © — © 

: © © Ol 1 CO rr t- -r Lft o 1 r- r- 



■ -r uft © -r © © uft X t- L- oc I- t- t- t- oc © © 



t- I— t- I- c- t- t^ OC X X X X X X X X X ©.©.©.©.©.©.©.©.©.©.©©© © 
xxxxxxxxxxxxocxxxxxococxxxxxj;x ©.©.©.©. 



Eh 


n3 


£ 


3 


O 


.H 




d 




o 


a 


U 


o 




<J 


M 


fa t 




t— 1 


£ 


CO 


o 


^ 


fa 


J 




u 


CO 


£ 



^ fa 



fa 

< 



fa 
Q 



^ o 

fa H 
o . 

o - 

l-H 

h >: 

a. # 
S b 

S ^ 

o •-> 

>h 

r— I 

< 

fa 



o 
fa 

& 

«i 

fa 
>< 

a 

5« 



5 Is 



CO C-l © 00 t— Lff C- Iff Iff CI ^< CJ ^ 51 CO 


Ll'*«aO3M!Mai0CMI>a3i'* 

oco-occjiffrr-iT't— ©©oocj©t-"*' 

Tf Tf O Ll ?) f 1 t W K 1> w5 f O ■* O 

iff uo iff iff l« iff iff iff iff i_o iff iff © © »- 


©i— i©Tf'*j"*<©'CJ©cJcct~©i— i© 


iffMtSXOOMtHVOMOSf 
M C M L" IS O M f t S - L.1 M S> X M 


U5USliS^<rf<U3iO^^"U5ii5mkfl«at- 


X O Ut ^ L'T X « ■tf f 1 f 1 M « C t- CJ 

XnOLONt-^H^McXOJlH 









— 
o 

k3 



o ?: x m ■» m t- o « o r. ut is h lo 

XX~J!l-OX'*0'9 , H — CC:M 
Lff©C0-'S<LffOCi>-CJ©C--i-}<iff0CC0© 



axNXHt-«MOt-»M«Lir. 

Ct-OXt-t-tXnOnC^CM 

S)^<03ri<OHC44*COt>a)lOrl i— l© 
•*r iff -^ Lff iff iff iff "Jf ^f iff iff iff © © © 



■^lOtOOOOHMMMOt-INQON 

CI Iff OC i—i © i— l CI © Lff 43 r- i— 00 T © 

C « 3 41 L* H t t- M C: M ^ X X H 

t"l0<O<*OOMO00M00t<3«COt- 
n C) X ri M l> 4IO) t- « M O: 5! o 00 

•^<O'*''*-^t | '^ , ir:a>00d-* , i- j cc-!t<Tt< 

Lt LC lO L? LOlO IC Tt< f LO W 45 C C t- 



C)0Hli:flt"Xf5'3 0»r-t-S 
iff 43 43 m ^ © CO 34 43 t- iff Iff i— i C- © 
i— 1 r-t t- tH t- 34 t— CJ CI 43 Ol CO 43 X i— i 

43 OS© 43 t- t- t- CO*-- Cl~i>- OC 5*5 00 LO 

COH1"tM45XC«MMl.'!ai>M 
HX*OOHOrl*X00N(S»H 
Iff Iff Lff © iff © © Lff Lff © Iff Iff © [— 00 



Iff CI CO CJ r-l Iff i-l 34 CO Lff CI 00 CI t- iff 

C-M3. 45TT40t-1"r^r- ' l~ t- CO CJ 
0CCJ©Lff0Clff©l-C]t>-5<C0t-i— ICO 

tf liO H f C f H l- © 31 CI CO C] 34 rH 
t- Iff. 34 t- CO i— I CJ t-i 00 43 C- 34 34 -^" CO 

Iff LO M 45 H r^ LO 3. •* H H H CO CI K5 



■ 43 © 43 43 43 t- I 



llflOt-t- 



HMfovMr-uo^aaHwat-o 

C0^-t-C0C0©"*CJC0C0C0©C0 0CLff 

forot-eociMi-r.'TwTtiriO^'O 



CI C-1 


_ 


- 


t-Tt- 


s 


Lff CJ © rH 


- 


©CO 


43 iff 


t- 


— 


UiOH 


— 


l- 0O CI Lff © C) 31 


Iff T— 


40: 


43 


Lff LO CO 


s 


Lff 00 C- Lff 


9 


^H© 


Iff Iff 


iff 


Lff Lff Lff Iff 


- 


Lff © © Lff 


- 


© O0 


t- t-00 


^_ 


©©-*" 


"0 


thX <M © 


,_ 


© CO 


©i— 


t- 34 


"S< CJ tj< 


t- 


© C-00 ^H 


3 


CO C3 


t- Cl o 


CO 


OXffl 


34 


CO CO © © 


80 


00 © 


© co 


Lff 


Lff 


© l>00 


— 


Lff © Tf © © CO t- 


CI 00 


CI X N 1- X « 3. N CI CI 


l0 


00 •* 


CI M C f X 3. r- 


— 


© CO © r-< r-* 00 © 



Lff Lff Lff Lff Tf Tf Lff 43 -* Lff Lff- Lff © Lff t- 



l-!Lffl-"*©^C-T^t>©TfCll>CJ© 

LffC-lCOi— llff0C©©©C-©©t-©Lff 
OCOCt-©TT<©©CO-^OC'r^©©'M0O 

r-i © ©*© t> © i**© 00 rf ©ft-Co"© © 
©i— iL.OXf'fl'ffXTfO?. t-t-J5 
t-CO©©OCOOi-(Cl©©^^©00 ©© 

TLffTfLff-^TLffLff-S'-^lLffLffLffLff© 



"« , 1<t-OOt-OHOC"t-!2MNSJ 
© © i-l © iH Lff CJ ©"*•©©© 00 CO © 
©TH0O©r-(©00COiH^Ht~-C-OC^HLff 

•^ , Lff^H©©i-l©OC^'^l>C]Tr-©t- 
Lff CI © © CI 00 r* © 00 CJ © © 00 © 00 

LO LO O 3) H t- i-l CI C4 O 4? d O H O 
Lff Iff Lff Lff Lff •*■ Lff Lff Lff Lff Lff Lff © © C- 



CloCLffCOi— Ift-NwW^'Cit-fl'M 
CJ©©©O0t>CIOCC-'^«Cl'r©©© 
©©CJi— l©©00©^<C00C©C0©^ti 

oc t- ci*l> co" Lff ©*o t-i © Lff rr © i— © 

OCLfff©©ClO0C0©LffC0©©^C<l 

i— 'oc^©co©Lff•^t•Lffcoc~•>^«occO'*T , 

t> © Lff © © Lff Lff Lff © Lff © Lff Lff © 00 



O 45 uO iff I- t H C t- M TC H X 3. LO 
t~©©^©©Lff>!-t©r-©©Lffr^l- 
Cl © Lff Lff i— I t- C- 00 CI © © CJ C 1 CO' oc 

Lffc^Tj«c<icj-Trc-t-oc©c<icoLff©3» 

Lff C- CO 1—1 © © d Lff Lff © Lff t- CO CO © 

© t- O0 00 O0 © Lff C-l CO OO CO Lff t~ t< CJ 

©LCOTLff'*» , ' , ^<LffLre©'3<©LreLff©00 



"*L0 45t-X3!OHMC0Tflff45t>X 

033030nHHHHHHnH 
© © © © © © © © © © © © © © © 






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 45 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works 

Association. 






LOWELL WATER WORKS. 

Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 

GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1918. estimated, 125,000. 

Date of construction, 1870 to 1873. 

Date of construction, High Service, 1881. 

Date of construction. Driven Wells, 1893 to 1912. 

By whom owned? The City of Lowell. 

Source of supply: Two hundred ten (210) driven wells in the valley of 

River Meadow Brook, and live hundred twenty-five (525) driven 

wells at Pawtucket Boulevard. 
Mode of supply : Pumping to reservoir and pumping direct. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 
1. Builders of Pumping Machinery. 

At West Sixth Street Station : 

One engine, capacity 5,000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 
One engine, capacity 500,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 
One engine, capacity 8.000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours, Allis- 

Chalmers Company. 

At Cook Wells Station, Temporary Pumps: 

One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, The 

Deane Steam Pump Company. 
One engine, capacity 3,000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours, The 

Deane Steam Pump Company. 



46 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 

At Lower Boulevard Station : 

One engine, capacity 8,000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours, The 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
One engine, capacity S. 000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours, The 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
One engine, capacity 7.000.000 gallons in twenty-four hours. The 

Kerr Turbine Company. 
One engine, capacity 10,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, The 

Kerr Turbine Company. 
One engine, capacity 3.000.001) gallons in twenty-four hours. Henry 

It. Worthington. 
One engine, capacity 3,000,003 gallons in twenty-four hours. Henry 

R. Worthington. 

At Upper Boulevard Station, Temporary Pumps: 

'a. Kind. Bituminous. 
b. Brand of coal. New River. 

2. Descriptions of fuel used: / c - Average price of coal per gross ton 

delivered, $11.92. 

1. Percentage of ash. 
,e. Wood, price per cord. 

3. Coal consumed for the year. 8,025.053 pounds. 

4. Pounds of wood — 3 = equivalent amount of coal. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year (3) + (4) 8 025,053 

pounds. 

6. Total pumpage for the year, 4,080.105.103 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which Low Service pumps at West 

Sixth Street work. 160.16 feet. 
Average static head against which pump at Lower Boulevard 

works, 46.31 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pumps work: 

West Sixth Street. Low Service 183.05 

West Sixth Street. High Service 65.15 

Lower Boulevard 57.74 

0. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal (5) =559. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 47 

10. Cost of pumping per million gallons, figured on pumping station 

expenses, viz., $89,469.64, $17.03. 

11. Cost of purifying per million gallons, figured on filter expenses. 

viz.. $11,188.86, $5.37.— 

STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

1. Estimated total population at date, 12.1,000. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 125,000. 

3. Estimated population supplied, 125,000, 

4. Total consumption for the year, 2,753.448,700 gallons. 

5. Passed through meters. 1 ,609.489.2S2 gallons. 

6. Percentage of consumption metered, 58.45. 

7. Average daily consumption. 7.544,243 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 60.35. 

9. Gallons per day to each consumer, 60.35. 

10. Gallons per day to each tap. 530.45. 

11. Cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured on total main- 

tenance (item C. C), $78.17. 

12. Total cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured on total 

maintenance and interest on bonds, .$90.88. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. 

Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast iron. 

2. Sizes, 4 inches to 30 inches. 

3. Extended 4.279 feet during the year. 

4. Total now in use, 160.46 miles. 

5. Length of pipe less than 4 inches diameter, 3 miles, more or less. 

6. Number of hydrants added during the year (public and private). 9. 

7. Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,455. 

8. Number of stop gates added during the year, 16. 

9. Number of stop gates now in use, 2,126. 

10. Number of stop gates smaller than 4 inches, 48. 

11. Number of blow-offs, 33. 

12. Range of pressure on mains, 27 lbs. to S2 lbs., Low Service. 



48 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF WATER WORKS. 



SERVICES. 

13. Kind of pipe, lead, lead-lined iron, iron and tin-lined iron. 

1 \. Sizes, $4 in. to 8 in. 

15. Extended 5,3G3 feet. 

16. Total now in use, 106.08 miles. 

17. Number of Service Taps added during the year, 112. 
13. Number now in use, 13,985. 

19. Average length of service, 47.67 feet. 

20. Average cost of service for the year, $43.84. 

21. Numberof meters added, 172. 

22. Number now in use, 12,061. 

23. Percentage of services metered, 86.3%. 

24. Percentage of receipts from metered water (B-f-C), 95.5. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN KEARNEY, 

City Engineer. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BIRTHS, 'MARRIAGES 
and DEATHS 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 




FOR THE YEAR 



1918 



CITY OF LOWELL 



OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, May 27, 1919 



To the Municipal Council, 



Gentlemen 



The annual report of Births, Marriages and Deaths for the year 
1918, as of record in this office, is respectfully submitted as follows : 



BIRTHS 



Wards 

Whole Number 

Males 

Females 

American Parents 

Foreign Parents 

American Father 
Foreign Mother 

Foreign Father 
American Mother 

Twins 



123456789 

198 531 310 329 344 751 257 262 233 

101 312 156 174 165 379 131 141 108 

97 219 154 155 179 372 126 121 125 

75 66 121 89 80 187 102 141 105 

78 407 111 196 219 336 83 58 65 

22 24 39 25 27 107 34 30 35 

23 34 39 19 18 121 38 33 28 



Total 
3215 
1667 
1548 



3 



8 



1553 



343 



353 
36 



In addition there are recorded 67 births, the parents being residents 
elsewhere, and 31 births occurring elsewhere the parents being residents of 
Lowell. Still-births not included 181. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 6 

MARRIAGES 

Twelve hundred and one marriages were recorded for the year 1918, 
ten hundred and seventy being solemnized in Lowell and one hundred thirty- 
one solemnized elsewhere. 



January 103 

February 84 

March 51 

April 96 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

May 88 

June 163 

July 93 

August * . ..Ill 



September 130 

October 93 

November 113 

December 76 



NATIONALITY OF PARTIES 

Grooms 
United States 626 



Canada 

Greece 

Austria and Russia 

Portugal, Azores and Madeira. 

Ireland 

England 

Sweeden 

Scotland 

Italy 

Turkey 

Other Countries 



173 

137 

68 

57 
50 
36 
14 
10 
9 
4 
17 



Brides 

663 

167 

122 

64 

54 

63 

28 

12 

13 

3 

1 

10 



Grooms under 21 years, 93 ; brides under 18 years, 35. 



DEATHS 
The number of deaths in the city returned and recorded in 1918, 
exclusive of still-births, was 2473; males 1270, females 1203 ; eighty-five of 
this number being non-residents. The deaths of 157 Lowell residents who 
died elsewhere being also recorded. 

Detailed statistics may be obtained in the report of the Board of 
Health. 

Very respectfully, 



STEPHEN FLYNN, 



City Clerk. 



In Municipal Council, May 27, 1919. 
Received and ordered on file. 



STEPHEN FLYNN, 



City Clerk. 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Health 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 




FOR THE YEAR 



1918 



BUCKLAND PRINTING COMPANY 



72-74 MIDDLE ST., LOWELL 



ORGANIZATION, 1918 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



PIERRE BRUNELLE, M. D., Chairman 
THOMAS F. CARROLL, M. D. 
JOHN E. DRURY 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT OFFICERS 
Office Employees 
MARSHALL L. ALLING, M. D, Bacteriologist 
FREDERICK A. BATES, Agent 
SPENCER BROWN, Fumigator 

JOHN N. DRURY, M. D., Tuberculosis Examining Physician 
MARY FINNEGAN, Child Welfare Nurse 
WILLIAM A. JOHNSON, M. D., Physician 
( BERTHA E. MULVEY, R. N., Tuberculosis Nurse 
KATHERINE W. SNOW, Registrar 
LOIS A. TITCOMB, Child Welfare Nurse 

INSPECTORS 

FRANCIS J. O'HARE, Inspector of Contagious Diseases 
STEPHEN GARRITY, Plumbing Inspector 
WILLIAM H. CONNORS, Tenement House Inspector 
CLEMENT A. HAMBLET, M. D. V., Inspector of Meats and 

Provisions 
JOHN KEARNEY, Health Inspector 

MILK DEPARTMENT 

MELVIN F. MASTER, B. S., Milk Inspector 
JOHN J. COUGHLIN, Collector of Samples 

PRIVATE SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

DR. HOWARD W. JEWETT, 
Resigned for. war service. 

Succeeded by 
DR. JOHN N. DRURY 
DR. RODRIGUE MIGNAULT 
DR. FREDERICK P. MURPHY 
DR. RALPH C. STEWART 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 



To the Honorable Mayor and Members of the Municipal Council 
of the City of Lowell. 

Gentlemen : — 

The Board of Health herein respectfully presents its forty- 
first annual report. 

Diseases Dangerous to Public Health 

Number Cases Deaths 
Scarlet Fever 

The mortality from Scarlet Fever was 4% 
Diphtheria 

The mortality from diphtheria was 9% 
Measles 

Infantile Paralysis 
Whooping Cough 
Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 
Mumps 
Typhoid Fever 

The fewest number of cases and deaths 
from Typhoid Fever ever reported at the 
Board of Health Office. 



99 


4 


% 




186 


17 


501 


8 


7 


5 


59 


7 


19 


9 


4 





21 


2 



Tuberculosis 



256 



182 



The reports of the Tuberculosis Examining Physician at the 
Tuberculosis Clinic and the Tuberculosis Nurse are hereby pre- 
sented as follows, showing the work done during the year by the 
Board of Health in their efforts to stamp out Tuberculosis : — 



© BOARD OF HEALTH 

REPORT OF EXAMINING PHYSICIAN FOR TUBER- 
CULOSIS CLINIC 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 
Gentlemen : — 

I have the honor to submit a report of the work done by me 
as Examining Physician from Jan. 1st, 1918 to Dec. 31st, 1918: — 

Total Number of Examinations 298 

Total Number new cases 180 

Incipient cases, of Tuberculosis 28 

Moderately advanced cases of tuberculosis 48 

Advanced cases of Tuberculosis 35 

Arrested cases of Tuberculosis 7 

Exposed cases of Tuberculosis 110 

Suspicious cases of tuberculosis 37 

Non-Tubercular cases 33 

COMMENTS 
The attendance at the clinic continues to show a marked in- 
crease in the number of new cases each year. 

1915 58 new cases 

1916 70 " 

1917 105 " " 

1918 180 " 

A new work was started the past year of examining children 
whose parents were suffering from Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 
no children were examined. This work we consider most im- 
portant as all authorities agree Pulmonary Tuberculosis starts 
during childhood, and the great majority of all the children 
examined were infected. These children should be carefully 
watched during their school life, and if possible should have the 
advantage of open air schooling and special instruction in physi- 
cal culture. 

The clinic work has been greatly aided by the two additional 
Board of Health nurses, and by Miss Roche of the Lowell Guild. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN N. DRURY, M. D 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF TUBERCULOSIS NURSE 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowellj Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

Following is a report of work done by me from Jan. 1, 1918 
to Dec. 31, 1918, as Tuberculosis Nurse for the Health Depart- 
ment :— 

Number of cases examined 298 

New Cases 180 

Old Cases 118 

Incipient Cases 28 

Moderately Advanced Cases 48 

Advanced Cases 35 

Exposed Cases 110 

Arrested Cases 7 

Non-Tubercular 33 

Number of cases at the following sanatoria 

Rutland 6 

North Reading 28 

Lakeville 3 

Westfield 13 

Chelmsford St. Hospital, Lowell 14 

St. John's Hospital, Lowell 1 

Lawrence Tb. Hospital 9 

Lynn Tb. Hospital 4 

Clinton Tb. Hospital 2 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital 1 

Cambridge Tb. Hospital 3 

Number of deaths from Tuberculosis 158 

Number of Deaths that were under supervision 42 

Number of deaths that were not under supervision 116 

Number of cases discharged from the Training Camps on 

account of Tuberculosis 11 

Under supervision ....... 5 

Not under supervision , 6 

Number of visits made during the year 1640 

Ophthalmia Cases 13 

Number of Visits made (Ophthalmia Cases) 140 



o BOARD OF HEALTH. 

No visits were made at homes of tuberculosis patients from 
Sept. 27, 1918 to Oct. 27, 1918, as I worked at the Lowell Guild 
during Influenza Epidemic. 

Respectfully submitted 
BERTHA E. MULVEY, R. N. 

The foregoing report on Tuberculosis would indicate that 
most, if not all the room space of the Contagious Hospital build- 
ings off West Meadow Road, when finished, and ready for occu- 
pancy will be taken up by persons so affected. 

On November 14, 1918 the Trustees of the Lowell Corpora- 
tion Hospital served the following notice to the City of Lowell : — 

"At a meeting of the Trustees of the Lowell Corporation 
Hospital, held Nov. 13th, it was voted to discontinue the conta- 
gious ward, which has been maintained by them for a good many 
years, Dec. 1st. After the above date any contagious cases will 
will have to be cared for by the City." 

Consequently the Cottage on the Chelmsford St. Hospital 
grounds, was prepared and pressed into service for the caring 
of people ill with contagious diseases, other than Tuberculosis. 
It contains six rooms, with space for a dozen beds. Knowing that 
on several occasions the contagious wards of the Lowell Hospital 
above referred to have been overcrowded, overflowing in fact, 
it is apparent that the accommodations which the city now has for 
diphtheria, scarlet fever, cerebro-spinal Meningitis, infantile 
paralysis, influenza, etc., are too limited for security in case 
of a serious epidemic. 

We urgently recommend, therefore, the immediate construc- 
tion of a building such as has already been submitted by plan and 
approved by the State Department of Health for the reception of 
persons having diphtheria, scarlet fever and other diseases dan- 
gerous to the public health. 

Cases Reported Deaths 
Ophthalma Neonatorum 45 o 

During the year two child welfare nurses were added to the 
personnel of the department, reports of whose work are hereby 
given : — 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF CHILD WELFARE NURSES, for 1918. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

Following is a report of visits made by me from July 15, 1918 
to Dec. 31, 1918: — 

New Cases Visited 462 

Revisited 133 

Total Number of visits 595 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 8 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum Revisited 105 

Infants' Deaths , 27 

Still Births 10 

Worked at Lowell Guild from Sept. 28 to Oct. 28, 1918, 
(during the Influenza Epidemic. 

Yours respectfully, 

MARY FINNEGAN, R. N. 

Child Welfare Nurse. 



10 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

Following is a report of visits made by me from July 15, 
1918 to Dec. 31, 1918 inc.: — 

New Cases 489 

Revisited 146 

Total 635 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum Cases 12 

Revisits Neonatorum Cases 61 

Total Visits Ophthalmia 73 

Infants Deaths 25 

Still Births 10 

Worked at Lowell Guild from Sept. 28 to Oct. 28, 1918, 
during Influenza Epidemic. 

Yours respectfully, 

LOIS A. TITCOMB, R. N. 

Child Welfare Nurse. 



HOARD OF HKALTH. 11 



l\f 


J^UlilNA/\ 


Deaths 






Cases 


Deaths from 




Reported 


Influenza 


Pneumonia 




1645 


38 


66 




5012 


106 


297 




133 


10 


22 




604 


9 


41 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 

7394 163 426 

Judged by the morbidity and mortality, the recent pandemic 
of Influenza was the most extensive that has occurred in modern 
times. There never was an outbreak in the City of Lowell that 
destroyed so many of her people within so short a time. Robust 
individuals seemed to be very susceptible, perhaps on account of 
greater exposure. In fact 39% of those who died from Influenza 
and Pneumonia were between the ages of 25 and 40. During 
the months of Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec, the people died at the 
rate of thirty-two per thousand. The more crowded sections 
suffered most, likely due to greater contact between the well and 
the sick ; likely due to living under greater stress, thereby dimin- 
ishing the resistance to infection. Better homes afford more 
comfort, more sunshine, which tend generally to well-being. 

On Sept. 20th, according to reports made at the Board of 
Health office by physicians, the first cases made their appearance 
here, although the disease did not become a reportable one to the 
State Department of Health until Oct. 4th. In a few days the 
disease increased rapidly to an epidemic. The first wave of the 
epidemic here may be set from Sept. 23d to Oct. 22d, with a 
quiescence during November, and until Dec. 26th, when there was 
a slight recrudescence of 121 cases. 

The most important information authorities have in regard 
to influenza from a practical standpoint in their efforts to suppress 
it, is its mode of transference. It is spread directly from person 
to person. Highly contagious in the early stages (when often it 
is not seriously taken as such by the individual) the influenza 
bacillus is found in the secretions of the nose, throat, and respira- 
tory tract. The danger by droplet infection when sneezing or 
coughing in large gatherings or mass meetings, during a pandemic 
of this kind is very great, as mild cases and carriers are not 



12 BOARD OF HEALTH. 

recognized; also by objects recently mouthed, such as the public 
drinking cup or glass ; danger from which sources cannot be 
minimized. 

During the run of the epidemic the Board of Health held daily 
and sometimes twice daily meetings. On September 26th the 
Board voted to close the schools, theatres, picture houses and 
other places of amusement. On Oct. 5th, the Board voted to 
place a ban on the following places : — 
Pool Rooms and Bowling Alleys 
Soda Fountains and other public drinking places. 
Public Library 

Bar Rooms in all places where liquor was drunk on the premises 
Card playing or loitering in or about coffee houses or other public 

gathering places 
All funerals were ordered to be private 
All stores were ordered closed at 6.30, including the fourth-class 

liquor license places. 

On Oct. 13th, and Oct. 20th, the churches were ordered 
closed. 

On Oct. 25th, the Board of Health felt that, from the rapid 
falling off in the number of cases reported during the past week 
and the better condition of things throughout the city relating to 
the epidemic, there was good reason to believe the disease had 
sufficiently abated to lift the ban on the institutions and other 
places affected by its previous orders. Therefore, it was voted 
that the churches were to open on the next Sunday; the schools, 
theatres, and business in general to be resumed on the following 
Monday (Oct. 28th) . As to the best measures to be taken to guard 
against sickness, general warnings to the public were re-issued, i. e. 

"Avoid coughing and sneezing in crowds. Whosoever must 
cough or sneeze should, under these circumstances, in all respect 
to himself and for the safety of others, smother his cough or 
sneeze, with a clean handkerchief at least. 

Those who are not well, be it from a supposed cold, or pos- 
sibly impending grippe, should for their own good, as well as for. 
the protection of others, remain in bed during the febrile stage, 
and seek proper treatment. They should remain at home. Their 
presence in close quarters is a menace. 



BOAKD OF HKALTH. 13 

One cannot emphasize too strongly the danger of the common 
drinking cup ; the glass at the soda fountain and the saloon ; the 
spoon and plate, especially in the serving of ice cream. In fact, 
in all objects recently mouthed, where infective mucus is apt to 
remain, lurks eminent danger. Sterilization cannot be too strongly 
insisted upon. These have been ordered properly sterilized by 
the health authorities, who realize, nevertheless, that the cup, 
plate and spoon which can be destroyed immediately .after in- 
dividual use, is a better method to have in stores where bever- 
ages, food and ice cream are served. 

Our industrial establishments must all be provided with 
such means, as to ensure. fresh and pure drinking water, for their 
help, without danger of infection to them. 

We must have a rigid enforcement of the law against spitting 
in public places. 

Again, the Public should continue to observe the precaution- 
ary simple measures so often recommended ; for, after all, in- 
fluenza is a disease, the control of which rests with the public. 
The great source of communicable diseases is "Man himself." 
Man is the great source and reservoir of human infections and 
Man is Man's greatest foe in this regard. Realizing that the 
control of man himself requires the consent to be governed by 
advice, the Board of Health again, now that the disease is on the 
wane, emphasizes the following simple laws of health : — 

Avoid close contact with your fellowmen, especially those 
who have catarrhal symptoms. 

Children should not be allowed to attend school with any 
symptoms of a cold, nor should they from any household where 
there is any indication of the disease. 

Keep away from improperly ventilated places. 

Observe the simple rules of cleanliness. 

Live clean and get all the fresh air and sunshine, which is 
yours for the taking. 

Get your fair amount of sleep, and don't borrow trouble." 

It might be of interest to glance at the following charts given 
below, showing the daily number of cases reported, and deaths 
from both influenza and pneumonia, during the violence of the 
epidemic. 



14 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



From Sept. ist to Dec. 31st, deaths from Influenza and Pneu- 
monia are given below by ages, showing the greater susceptibility 
of people at certain ages, in comparison with others : 



S9[B uiaji 



sajBH 



J3AO 

Pub saB9A" 06 



sjb9A" 06 -lapun 
puB SJB9A 28 



s.!T?eA gg aapun 
puB s.iboa OS 



saBgA' 08 Jspun 
puB sjb9A" 21 



sa-eeA 92, aapun 

PUB SJB9A" 02, 

sjb9X 0L -lapun 
puB s.iB9A 29 



sjb9A' 99 aspun 
puB sjb9A" 09 



SJB9A 09 -tspun 
Pub SJBaA" 29 



saBSA" 99 aapun 
puB saBeA 09 



sjb9a 09 Japun 

PUB SJB9A gj> 

saB9i? 2^ aspun 
puB sjBeA - Qf 



sjb9A" 0^ aepun 

PUB SJB9A" 98 



S.IBOA 2g aapun 

pUB S.IBOA - 08 



SJB9A 08 J9pun 
puB s.iBaA gs 



sjb&a gg aaputi t 

PUB SJB9A OS 

sjb9^ oz Japun 

puB S.IB9A 91 



sjbsA 91 agpun 

PUB SJB9X 0T 



SJB9A OX J9pun 

PUB SJB9A - g 



SJB9A* 

9 agpun ib^oj, 



sjb9^ 2 J9pun 

PUB SJB9A" f 



SJB9;? f agpun 

PUB SJB9A" 8 



SJB9i? 8 J9pun 

PUB SJB9A - Z 

SJB9J? z J9pun 
JB9A" x .ispufi 



8T6I JOj ibioj, 



-1 
< 

h 


























































< 

Q 

<0 

ON 

* 


? 

<u 

A! 

H 

< 

Q 


rn 






















































O 




























| 


























8> 


















































































( 


























fN 




























j 




















/) 






NO 
















































1 


































/ 




















j 






(N 














































h 








rn 


























, 




















(\ 






r^ 
























< 






















/ 






rs 














































Y 


\ 






O 
















































I 






0^ 






















< 
























i 


/ 






CO 
























\, 


) 


















1 




/ 






r^ 












































\ 










nC 














































T 








w 


















f\ 


*** 
























J 










Tf 


















L 


•-^ 






















< 












m 












































s 


1 








2 












































J 


j 








H 


















-», 
























< 




1 








O 




















---> 


A 
























L 








o- 




















-- 


3 




















< 












CO 












































v 


> / 


) 






r^ 












































/ 


/ 








NO 










































( 




\ 








in 


















/ 


^ 






















\ 












■*r 
















/ 


' 


























> 


v 








Wl 
















/_ 




















•*; 






< 


s, 


) 








™ B > 










































■* 


>\ 








- vf 


































5C 


<! 






- 


1 










































i| 


A 






^ 




/ ■ 






0v 






































m- 








V 


) ■ 






CO 


**■■. 




































^ 








'/ 










<> 




















\ 














in 


r 






1 


\ 



























l> 






> 






















K 








11 
C-4 


^ 


















< 


s 














u 


^s 








A 








»N 


N 




















\ 














L 




N 
















(*1 


— ^ 






















s 












k 


"j 








( 








rs 


3 


































% 


ir 








^ 


\ 






fN 


V£ 


































i 


5 
















O 


^- 














































\ 






9 






















































CO 






1 





"J 





5 


Q 
*1 


8 


c 

e 

— i 




o 


£ 


° 














lj 


c 


w 


Q 






r^ 






















































-O 






















































in 























































BOARD OF HEALTH. 15 

It is also interesting to note, that of the total number of 
deaths from all causes during the year (2473), 800 or exactly 
one-third were caused from Influenza and Pneumonia. 

As time went on, the disease greatly increased the demands 
on the civil hospitals, also on the doctors and nurses whose ranks 
were much lessened by the absence of those who had enrolled in 
the country's service. Consequently, the contagious hospital 
buildings then nearing completion on West Meadow Road, Lowell, 
were hurriedly prepared and opened to the Public for the reception 
and treatment of Influenza patients on Oct. 9th. 

Seldom has a hospital been fitted for temporary business so 
quickly. Within a few days, the Mayor as Commissioner of 
Public Safety assisted by the Public Safety Committee had this 
new institution in full operation with a complete organization, 
and accommodations for 75 beds. In all there were 127 persons 
treated. There were 25 deaths at the hospital, making' a mortal- 
ity rate of 19%. The greatest number of patients cared for any 
one day was fifty-five. 

After rendering valuable service in splendid management 
and good results obtained, the hospital closed its doors on Nov. 
4th, twenty-seven days from the date of its opening. 

Too much praise cannot be given to all workers throughout 
the city who assisted in fighting the epidemic. It is to be ex- 
pected that doctors and nurses should cheerfully face the danger 
of infection and possible death in the care of the sick, but it is 
especially commendable that women and men, unaccustomed to 
such work should do it, willingly and unflinchingly. 

The Board again takes this opportunity to express its thanks 
for this loyal co-operation. The wonderful work done during the 
epidemic will stand out as one of the heroic deeds during this 
critical period. It but again exemplifies the splendid spirit of 
Americanism which is typical of Our City when occasion requires. 

PIERRE BRUNELLE, M. D., 
THOMAS F. CARROLL, M. D., 
JOHN E. DRURY, 

Board of Health. 



16 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
To the Lowell Board of Health. 
Gentlemen : — 

I have the honor to present the report of the department of 
Milk, Vinegar and Oleomargarine Inspection for the twelve 
months beginning Jan. 1, 1918. 

Twenty-seven hundred and sixty-two samples of milk; four 
samples of butter; and seven samples of vinegar have been ana- 
lyzed during the year. About seventy dairies were visited and 
samples of milk obtained. 

There were four hundred and twenty-four stores licensed 
to sell milk after an inspection had been made. Twenty-six 
dealers were issued wagon licenses and thirty-nine stores were 
issued oleomargarine licenses. 

Eight cases of watered milk were prosecuted ; two cases of 
skimmed milk; two cases of violation of the Board of Health 
Rules and Regulations ; one case of improper use of registered 
milk bottles; one case of no sign on delivery w r agon; one case 
of milk below standard ; two cases of watered milk were found 
guilty and filed; two cases of skimmed milk were discharged; 
one case of watered milk was discharged. The fines amounted 
to $409.00. 

The milk department is in need of a proper room in which 
to carry on bacterial work. It has, at present, most of the neces- 
sary apparatus, but no place to set it up. A Dairy Inspector 
is also needed to inspect the five hundred or more dairies that 
send milk into the city of Lowell. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MELVIN F. MASTER, 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 17 



INSPECTOR OF MEATS AND PROVISIONS 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

The following is a report of the work done by the Inspector 
of Meats and Provisions for the year 1918: — 

INSPECTION OF STORES 

Number of inspections made of stores 3,415 

Condemned as unfit for food, 36 ducks, 659 pounds of beef, five (5) 
fowl and one and one-half (l 1 /^) barrels of fish. 

INSPECTION OF MEAT AT TIME OF SLAUGHTER 

- umber of carcasses of swine . . 347 

Number of carcasses of cattle 5 

Number of carcasses calves 4 

Number of carcasses of swine condemned 11 

Number of carcasses of cattle condemned 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. A. HAMBLET, M. D. V., 
Inspector of Meats and Provisions. 



MEDICAL INSPECTION PRIVATE SCHOOLS, 1918 

Number of calls 218 

Number examined 2967 

Number advised 629 

Number excluded 50 



18 BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 
Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

The following is a report of the plumbing work done for the 

year ending Dec. 31, 191 8: — 

Whole Number of Applications for Permits to do plumbing 648 

New Houses 70 

Old Houses 578 

Total , 648 

Total visits , 3116 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN GARRITY, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 19 



REPORT OF TENEMENT HOUSE INSPECTOR 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 

Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

Following is a report of the work done by me for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1918: — 

Tenements Inspected 757 

Stores Inspected 108 

Bakeries Inspected 65 

Amusement Houses Inspected 8 

Complaints Investigated 161 



Yours respectfully, 



WILLIAM H. CONNORS, 

Tenement House Inspector. 



20 BOAKD OF HEALTH. 

Notices to abate the following nuisances were sent from this 
office during the year 1918: — 

Clogged sink waste pipes 8 

Clogged Drains 25 

Clogged water closets 17 

Clogged cesspools 2 

Leaky sink waste pipes 31 

Leaky water supply pipes 7 

Leaky roofs 7 

Leaky water closets 21 

Leaky water closet tanks 6 

No water supply to tenements 30 

Dilapidated water closets 11 

Filthy tenements 2 

Filthy stables 5 

No water supply to water closets 54 

Rubbish in cellars 59 

Rubbish in yards 202 

No cover on house traps 5 

Plaster off ceilings 8 

Ceilings whitewashed 46 

No cover on sink trap 1 

Untrapped sinks 2 

Open back vent pipes 3 

Manure in yards 2 

Sewage in cellar 6 

Overflowing ash pits 6 

Removal of hens 5 

Removal of pigs 8 

Removal of pigeons 3 

Open drains 25 

Contents of dry wells overflowing 2 

Contents of privy vaults overflowing 3 

Broken water closet bowls 2 

No cover on water closet traps 4 

Clogged chimney flue 1 

Surface drainage 4 

Rubbish on roofs 3 

Paper off walls 4 

Leaky refrigerators 9 

Unsealed sink traps 3 

Broken and leaky sinks 1 

Rubbish in light shaft 1 

Permissions to clean privy vaults 9 

Permission granted to clean dry wells 4 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 21 



REPORT OF FUMIGATOR 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. i, 1919. 

Board of Health, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

Following is a report of the fumigating work done by me 
during the year 1918: — 

Houses 425 

Rooms 911 

Tuberculosis fumigations 146 

Infantile Paralysis Fumigations 8 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis Fumigations 17 

Smallpox Fumigations 2 



Respectfully Submitted, 



SPENCER D. ,BROWN, 

Fumi gator. 



22 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF WORK DONE IN BACTERIOLOGICAL 
LABORATORY DURING YEAR 1918 



DIPHTHERIA 



Examination of Cultures 



For Diagnosis 

Positive Negative 

Jan 10 95 

Feb 8 137 

Mar. 14 74 

Apr 4 67 

May 2 81 

June 2 51 

July 3 46 

Aug 9 18 

Sept 26 72 

'Oct 28 96 

Nov 31 58 

Dec 21 74 



158 



869 



For 
Positive 
12 


Release 
Negative 

25 


No 
Result 



Whole 

Number 

142 


7 


17 


1 


170 


16 


9 


2 


115 


2 


16 


2 


91 





7 


1 


93 


3 


6 


1 


63 





2 





51 





4 


2 


33 


2 


6 


13 


119 


5 


26 


3 


158 


14 


47 


5 


155 


9 


30 


10 


144 



70 



195 



40 



1332 



TUBERCULOSIS 

Examination of Sputum 

Positive 

Jan 5 

Feb 12 

Mar 14 

April 13 

May 9 

June 7 

July 8 

Aug 9 

Sept 14 

Oct 11 

Nov 11 

Dec 8 



Negative 

49 


No Result 

2 


Total 

56 


52 





64 


62 





76 


79 


2 


94 


73 





82 


48 





55 


31 





39 


21 





30 


28 





42 


25 


1 


37 


40 


2 


53 


42 


1 


51 



121 



550 



679 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 23 

TYPHOID FEVER 

Examination of Blood for Widal Reaction 

Positive Negative No Result Total 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

June 

July 

Aug 

Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 



3 


13 





7 


1 


8 


1 


18 





20 


2 


13 


1 


7 


4 


15 


8 


22 





11 


1 


7 





13 


21 
MALARIA 


154 






16 





7 





9 





19 





20 





15 





8 





19 


2 


32 





11 


1 


9 





13 



178 



Two specimens of blood were examined for the presence of 
the Malarial Parasite, with negative results. 

CEREBRO-SPINAL MENINGITIS 

The cerebro-spin-al fluid from 20 specimens of Meningitis 
was examined. In 9 of these cases, the Meningococcus of Epi- 
demic Cerebro Spinal Meningitis was found. 

ANTHRAX 

Two examinations were made for Anthrax, both of which 
showed positive results. 

OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM 

2 cases showed Gonococcus. 

1 case showed Staphylococci. 

1 case showed Morax-Axenfeld Bacillus. 

Forty-eight specimens of various character including exu- 
dates and pus from abscesses and ulcers were also examined in 
the Bacteriological Laboratory. 



^4 BOARD OF HEALTH. 

CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES REPORTED 

1918 1917 1916 

Diphtheria, including Croup 186 438 308 

Scarlet Fever 99 77 102 

Measles 501 360 1180 

Typhoid Fever 21 37 61 

Smallpox 2 1 1 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 19 17 9 

Infantile Paralysis 7 9 17 

Tuberculosis 256 244 223 

Influenza 7394 



DEATHS FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

1918 1917 1916 

Diphtheria, including Croup 17 24 41 

Scarlet Fever 4 3 6 

Measles 8 4 14 

Typhoid Fever 2 7 13 

Smallpox 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 9 10 7 

Infantile Paralysis 5 2 4 

Tuberculosis 182 177 149 

Influenza 164 3 10 



CASES OF DIPHTHERIA REPORTED TO THE BOARD 

OF HEALTH, 1918 

Cases 

Eeported Deaths 

January 10 2 

February 11 1 

March 19 4 

April 6 1 

May 5 1 

June 5 2 

July 4 

August 8 1 

September 29 1 

October * 25 1 

November 41 2 

December 23 1 

186 17 
Mortality of Diphtheria, 9.1 per cent. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 25 



MORTALITY OF DIPHTHERIA 

Antitoxin Treatment 



1894 33.0 per cent. 

1895 44.0 

1896 43.0 

1897 23.0 

1898 23.0 

1899 18.0 

1900 10.0 

1901 12.0 

1902 9.5 

1903 10.5 

1904 11.0 

1905 6.0 

1906 9.0 

1907 7.5 

1908 7.0 

1909 12.5 

1910 9.2 

1911 9.7 

1912 10.4 

1913 9.9 

1914 16.3 

1915 10.6 

1916 13.3 

1917 5.5 

1918 9.1 



26 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



SCARLET FEVER 

1918 

Cases reported 99 

Deaths 4 

Per cent total cases 4.0 

Cases 
Reported 

January 4 

February 5 

March 8 

April 7 

May 5 

June 6 

July 6 

August 7 

September 6 

October S 

November 10 

December 26 



1917 


1916 


77 


102 


3 


6 


3.9 


5.9 


Deaths 









1 


































2 




1 















99 



MEASLES 

Cases 

Reported Deaths 

January 19 

February 10 

March 21 

April 56 

May 105 

June 97 1 

July Ill 2 

August 36 4 

September 13 

October 19 1 

November 1 

December 13 



501 



8 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



27 



INFANTILE PARALYSIS 

Cases 

Reported Deaths 

January 3 1 

February \ 

March 2 

April 1 2 

May 1 

June 

July , 

August 

September 

October 

November 1 1 

December 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS 



January 
February 
March . . 
April 

May 

June .... 

July 

August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



Cases 
Reported 


Deaths 


1 


1 


4 


2 


5 


4 


4 





1 





2 


1 














2 


1 





















19 



28 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



TUBERCULOSIS 

Cases 

Reported Deaths 

January 13 9 

February 19 16 

March , 26 9 

April 27 26 

May 26 19 

June 15 16 

Jluly 19 12 

August 17 16 

September 19 11 

October 14 21 

November 27 8 

December 34 19 



256 



182 



TYPHOID FEVER 

Cases 

Reported Deaths 

January 2 

February 

March 2 

April 1 

May 

June 1 

July 1 

August 3 1 

September 10 1 

October 

November 1 

December 



21 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 29 



TYPHOID FEVER 

Population 

Total 1918 107,978 

Total 1917 107,978 

Total 1916 107,978 

Total 1915 106,294 

Total 1914 106,294 

Total 1913 106,294 

Total 1912 106,294 

Total 1911 106,294 

Total 1910 106,294 

Total 1909 96,380 

Total 1908 96,380 

Total 1907 96,380 

Total 1906 96,380 

Total 1905 ' . . . 94,889 

Total 1904 104,402 

Total 1903 101,959 

Total 1902 99,574 

Total 1901 94,969 

Total 1900 94,969 

Total 1899 90,114 

Total 1898 87,000 

Total 1897 • 87,000 

Total 1896 95,700 

Total 1895 84,359 

Total 1894 83,026 

Total 1893 81,694 

Total 1892 80,361 

Total 1891 79,029 

Total 1890 77,696 



A decrease from 1.59 per thousand inhabitants to .018 in 
twenty-nine years. 



Cases 
Reported 


Deaths 


21 


2 


37 


7 


61 


13 


112 


18 


85 


11 


65 


11 


86 


10 


61 


7 


186 


22 


91 


11 


188 


24 


73 


9 


30 


7 


56 


17 


48 


17 


238 


26 


83 


16 


70 


18 


85 


17 


57 


17 


119 


24 


105 


18 


178 


36 


172 


33 


282 


50 


160 


53 


373 


75 


293 


77 


454 


123 



30 BOARD OF HEALTH. 



1917 
1,001 


1916 

1,007 


937 


957 


1,938 


1,964 


459 


483 


532 


593 


621 


676 


32.0 


34.4 



VITAL STATISTICS 

1918 

Deaths, male 1,272 

Deaths, female 1,201 

Total 2,473 

Children under 1 year 525 

Children under 2 years 684 

Children under 5 years 797 

Per cent of total deaths under 5 years 32.0 

BIRTHPLACE 

Of Deceased Of Parents 

Lowell 1203 396 

Massachusetts 136 249 

Other States 313 623 

Ireland 258 1064 

Canada 232 933 

Great Britain 112 289 

Other Countries 193 1062 

Unknown 26 330 



2,473 4,946 

PLACES OF INTERMENT 

St. Patrick's Cemetery 1070 

Edson 344 

Westlawn ! 218 

Lowell 66 

St. Joseph's 544 

St. Peter's 2 

Other Cemeteries 12 

Removed from city 217 



2473 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



31 



PLACES OF DEATH 

Ward 1 147 

Ward 2 320 

Ward 3 193 

Ward 4 225 

Ward 5 200 

Ward 6 402 

Ward 7 191 

Ward 8 155 

Ward 9 140 

Chelmsford St. Hospital 132 

Lowell Hospital 116 

Lowell General Hospital 88 

St. John's Hospital 135 

Coram Hospital 4 

Influenza-Emergency Hospital 25 

2,473 

Still-births during the year 181 



32 BOARD OF HEALTH. 



DEATH RATE 



Population, census 1890 

estimated 1891 

estimated 1892 

estimated 1893 

estimated 1894 

census 1895 

estimated 1896 

estimated 1897 

estimated 1898 

estimated 1899 

census 1900 

estimated 1901 

estimated 1902 

estimated 1903 

estimated 1904 

census 1905 

census 1906 

census 1907 

census 1908 

census 1909 

census 1910 

census 1911 

census 1912 

census 1913 

census 1914 

census 1915 

census 1916 

census 1917 

census 1918 



77,696 


1,959 


25.21 


79,029 


1,972 


24.95 


80,361 


2,224 


27.67 


81,694 


2,094 


25.62 


83,026 


1,775 


21.28 


84,359 


1,857 


22.01 


85,700 


1,901 


22.18 


87,000 


1,855 


21.33 


87,000 


1,808 


20.78 


90,114 


1,848 


20.50 


94,969 


1,849 


19.47 


94,969 


2,038 


21.45 


99,574 


1,935 


19.43 


101,959 


1,898 


18.61 


104,402 


1,736 


16.61 


94,889 


1,899 


20.02 


96,380 


1,918 


19.90 


96,380 


2,063 


21.40 


96,380 


1,963 


20.36 


96,380 


1,885 


19.55 


106,294 


2,100 


19.76 


106,294 


1,925 


18.11 


106,294 


1,891 


17.79 


106,294 


1,749 


16.45 


106,294 


1,768 


16.63 


106,294 


1,820 


17.12 


107,978 


1,964 


18.19 


107,978 


1,938 


17.95 


107,978 


2,473 


22.90 



CC 



X M 



O 

H-l 

O 
H 

u 

H 

O 



O 
Pu, 

H 

i— i 



■ 8 

1-1 O 

00 M 



< 


t/5 




ti 


J3 


U, 


>H 


-4-> 


1) 








W 


w 




ffi 


J=j 


n 


H 


■4-J 


-4— > 


^ 




Q 


U 


^ 




fe 


C/3 


CO 


hh 1 


^H 


i-N. 


J 


rn 


Cn 






IN. 



I-H 



m 



rt 



> £ 

■a B 

-— ' o 

On 

O 



~) 



r Pn 



CO 

I-H I-H 

, o 

^ <N 

CO *" 

CO 

r- 1 - — i 



[—1 -J-> l-i 

O Q « 

>=H CO 



X 



W 


seiBiua^j 


i-H 












CO 


■"* 


to 


i-H 


«o 




sejBjv 


l-t 










m 


CM O 

tH 




J9AO 
PUB SJB9A 06 

SJB9A 06 J3pun 

PUB SJBaA 98 

SJB9A 98 Japun 
puB SJB9A 08 

S.IB9A" 08 -lapun 

PUB SJBaA 92, 

sjb9A 92, japun 

PUB SJBaA Oi 

SJB9A oi Japun 

PUB SJB9A 99 

SJBaA 99 japun 

PUB SJBaA 09 

SJBaA 09 J9pun 

PUB SJBaA 99 

SJBaA 99 japun 

PUB SJB3A 09 

SJB9A" OS Japun 

PUB SJB3A g^ 

SJBaA 9^ japun 

PUB SJB3A Of 

sjBaX ofr -lapun 

PUB SJB9A 9g 

SJB9A 9g J9pun 
puB sjbsA 08 

saBaA 08 J3pun 
puB SJBaA" 92 

s.iBaA 92 J9pun 

PUB SJB3A OS 

sjbsA OS Jspun 
puB SJBaA 9x 

SJBaA gx Japun 
puB SJBaA OX 

SJBaA 0X -ispun 

PUB SJB9A g 


























































































































































































































1-i 






































































































































































i-H 


















i-H 
















»H 




lO 


SJB9A 

9 japun ib^ox 
SJT33A 9 J9pun 

PUB SJB9A f 

SJB9A f aapun 

puB SJBaA g 
SJB9A g .iapun 

PUB SJB9A Z 

SJB9A z jspun 

PUB JB9A X 

JB9A x -iapuQ 














00 CO 00 i-H o 

i-i 






















CM 






















SM 
















i-H tH iH CM 














Tl< CM CO 


OJ 














TJH • T* 


CM 


8X61 JOj ibjox 


CM 










00 -^ 00 tH 5£> 

1—1 




< 

W 
Q 

h 

O 

m 
W 
in 

D 
< 


Oi 
4> 
DO 

3 

o> 

Q ' 
d 

U T 
I ] 


V 

: c 

> 

< r- 

' c 

' ti 

i i 

) +■ 
t 

•> > 


1 

i 
i 

+■ 

E 

a 
pi 

V 


: £ 

• 73 

d 

01 > 
> Q 

> 1) r 

; '"^ 

d 

> OJ - 

. +-> 

< -(-> .^ 

! fi 

hH 


1 

!] 

4 c. 

1 
t 

c 




i 

1 
1 

i 

3 1 

3 p 
5 > 

i 

< if 


3 « 




c 

1 I 

\ 1 

5 t- 


b 
c 

I s 

! 1 

4 C 

3 ^ 
1 ^ 

^ cx 


: c 

c 

c 

3 X 

s c 

5 
) 

« .2 

> + 

: c 

: I 

5 o 


\ 
S 
) 

i 

> 
I 

3 ,0 

H "E 

> a 
: ^ 
» -♦- 
: -£ 

J. c 

5 I 

c 

3 C 


3 

3 

3 



X 

72 


I 
saiBiua^ 

sa-BR 










in 










CC 




CO 






























CO 






o 
< 


jaAO 
puB sJBaA" 06 

sjBaA" 06 Japun 

puB SJBaA* g§ 
SJBaA g8 japun 

PUB SJB3A 08 

SJBaA 08 Japun 

puB SJBaA gi 
sjBaA gi japun 

PUB SJB3A 0A 

SJBaA oi Japun 
puB SJBaA gg 

sjBaA 39 japun 
puB SJBaA 09 

sjboA 09 Japun 
Pub SJBaA gg 

SJBaA gg japun 
puB SJBaA OS 

SJBaA OS Japun 
puB SJBaA q$ 

SJBaA %f japun 
puB SJBaA Qf 

sjiaaA Of Japun 
puB sreaA gg 

sjBaA gg japun 
puB SJBaA 08 

SJBaA 08 Japun 
puB SJBaA gj" 

sjBaA gz Japun 
puB SJBaA OS 

SJBaA OS Japun 
puB SJBaA gx 

SJBaA gx Japun 
puB SJBaA oi 

SJBaA oi Japun 

puB SJBaA g 


































































































i-H 


— 




















— 




— 








— 


(M 






























i-H 




















r-t 




rH 




























CM 




























t~ 




















rH 








t-H 




















i-H 








rH 




























CO 
(M 
















.-1 


iH 






































i-i 






























o 

rH 




















i— 1 








CM 






























C- 






I-H 






















SJBaA 
g japun ibioj. 

SJBaA g japun 

PUB SJB3A" f 

SJBaA f japun 
puB SJBaA g 

SJBaA g japun 

puB SJBaA z 
SJBaA z Japun 

PUB JB3A x 

JB3A x JapuQ 


O 






f-l 








CM 


i-H 








-^ 































CM 




























<£> 




















i-H 








i-H 
















i-H 












rH 






l-l 








1-1 












8T6T JOJ IBjoj, 


to 

I-H 






<N 








CO 


!£> 










< 

B 
Q 

B 
O 
CO 

B 
w 
U 
< 


a. 
P 

Q 

© 


u 
a. 
> 

0) 

B 

> 

el 

i 


03 
h 

a 
'c 

a 

<: 


go 

A 

s- 

03 

o 

c 

a 
O 


> 

a 

+■> 
P 

a 

tr 
> 

Q 


E 

a 
IS 
a 

> > 

a 
•tr 
C 
a 

O 

> 



B 


'a 

5 

^R 
P 

_c 

'c 

c 

E 

< 
a 
3 

. 6i 

03 

a 
(Li 


) 

a 

> a 

"a 


> 

V 

I 

p 
a 


a 

' 1 

o 

k > 

s- 

B 

oc 




c 

C 

'■£ 

«. 
a 

R 
'I 

a 

p 

a 

k «. 
a 

> -c 
+■ 
C 

CT 


1 

P 

ai 

03 

-d 

e 

«l 

C 

.2 

o 

0) 

.s * 

k 1.1 

■a* 

3 
d 


> 

t 

s 

1 

« 

C 


rs 
u 

-d 

C 

rt 

* /— 

oj y 

3 2 

C 
C c 

S 




# c 

B 
ft 

CV 


1 



X 
H 

03 


saiBuiojj 






rH 00 00 CM 
CO 






rH 












; 


saiBiv 






CM CO CO t- 

t- rH 














rH 



< 


aa.vo 
Pub saBaA' 06 
saBaA" 06 aapun 
puB saBaA gs 

sanaA g^ aapun 

puB saBaA* 08 
saBaA" 8 aapun 

puB saBaA Si 
saBaA gi aapun 

puB saBaA 01 
sai3aA oi aapun 

puB saBaA gg 

saBaA gg aapun 

puB saBaA 09 
saBaA 09 aapun 

Pub saBaA gg 
saBaA gg aapun 

puB saBaA OS 
saBaA OS aapun 

puB sasaA g^ 

saBaA gf- aapun 

puB saBaA q$ 
saBaA o^ aapun 

puB saBaA gg 
saBaA gg aapun 

puB sasaA 08 
saBaA 08 aapun 

puB saBaA gg 
saBaA gs aapun 

puB saBaA OS 
saBaA OS aapun 

puB saBaA gx 
saBaA gx aapun 

puB saBaA 01 

saBaA 0X aapun 

puB saBaA g 


































































































i-H 






























CO 






























CM 






























rH 






























00 


rH 


























ITS 


rH 
























rH CM rH 

rH 




























(M 
CM 






























«o 

rH 


























- — ; 




CM 
CM 


rH 


; 


— — ; 





— 


; 


; 


: 








i-H C- CO CM 
CM 








rH CM CM rH 

rH 


























C- T-i 




























*r* rH 




























rH Tt" 






rH 












saBaA 
g aapun ib^oj, 
sa-BaA g aapun 
puB saBaA f 

saBaA ^ aapun 
puB saisaA g 

saBaA g aapun 
puB saBaA z 

saBaA z aapun 

puB asaA x 

aBaA x aapuQ 








rH CM CO 

rH 








rH 






(M 








'. '~ l ! 




























rH 






















































CO CM 








r "' 
















rH O0 














CM 


8X61 -ioj ibiox 






m ■* ■* ai 

-3 1 CM 

i—l 




1-1 


7-1 






CM 




< 

H 
O 

O 
w 
H 

Ul 

P 
< 

u 


CO 

o 
c 

+-> 

tn 
'tn 
O 
o 
>> 

f« 

° -f 
.£ 
'■£ 
u 

< 

cm 


E 

b 



"a 
ft 

in 

o. 


> 

c 
& 

f. 
a 

a 

-»- 

««- 
c 

a 

o * 

X 

E- 

It 

CN 


'. V 

a 

5 ! 

» o * 

> cu a 

> "3 T 

>■< ~ 
tu a 

d : 
) t- ex 

CM CN 


) 

| 

\ 

a 
i 

a 

1 

s- 
a 

E- 

c 

C> 


a 
« 

f x 

! i 

i c 

< p. 

c 
1 V 


c 

c 
c. 

> 

s= 
a 

1 

V 

c 

c 
w 

< 

r- 


| 

. 4- 

b 
> 


0) 

IS 

b 

c 

£? 

o w 

£ 

d 

<M 

CO 


» 

a 
b 
s- 
c 

r> 

a 

-4- 
«r- 

c 

! a 

' 1 

i s- 
a 

b 

V 




T 

a 

B 

> S- 

) a 
f 
a 

> b 

j _a 

> 1 
i S 

1 r£ 

j : 

* E- 

S T! 
J c 


i 



1 1 
■• ir 


! o 

- 

i 1 

) i 

j « 

3 C 


> 

s- 

C" 

a 
E- 

c 

I 

I 

■> 

> 

3 


a 


i 
i 

I 
> 

i 



k 


SajBUia^ 






T-H 


OC 

T— 


o 

i-i 


OC 


CO H 




Vk 


S9IBJ\[ 






CO © CO tH 

CO. 




J9AO 
PUB SJB9X 06 

sjBaA - 06 -iapun 

PUB SJB9X SS 

3JB9A" sg jgpun 

PUB S.IB3A" OS 

SJB9A" 08 Jspun 

pUB SJB9A" Si 

SJB9X 52, japun 

PUB SJB9A" Oi 

sjBeX oi aapun 

PUB SJB9X S£ 

sjBaA" 59 aapun 

PUB SJBaA" 09 

SJB9A" 09 .iapun 

PUB SJB9A* 5 5 

SJB9A" 55 jgpun 

PUB SJB3A* OS 

SJ.B9A OS -iapun 

PUB SJB9A" 5^7 

SJB9A 5^- aapun 

PUB SJB3A" Ofr 

sjb9A* ofr iapun 

PUB SJ-B9A S8 

SJB9A* yg agpun 

PUB SJB9A - 08 

SJB9A' OS -iapun 

PUB S.IB9A" qZ 

sjbsa" 52 aapun 

PUB SJBaA" 06 

SJB9A OS aapun 

PUB SJBaA 5X 

sjbbA ex aapun 

PUB SJB9A 01 
SJBaA 01 J9pun 

PUB SJB9A 5 




















r-i rH 












H rH 


<M 










"* 




rH i-H 








CO 










CO t- i-l r-4 • 










CO CO T-H CO r-t 








t- in lo co 










• LO 1—1 LO 










lo co co co 








» iH iH 


CO i-l 










■ i-i 


i-H 














i-H 














i-H 




































































SJB9A" 

g japun rmox 
SJB9A" 5 aepun 

PUB SJB3A f 

SJB9A" $ japun 

puB sjb3A g 
S.IB3A g japun 

PUB S.IB9A" Z 

SJB9X z .iapun 
puB jbsA x 

JB3A x .iapufi 


































































































8X61 JOj ibioj, 






CO 00 (M 00 CO CO. 
CO i-H r-4 rH 




3 
Eh 
< 

W 
Q 

fa 
O 

w 
H 

X 

fa 
<tj 

O 


General Diseases. — Concluded 
37. Blennorrhagia of the adult 


-a 
+■> 

O ; 
to ' 

c : 

.2 • 
fa> • 
u . 

0) . 

«H . 

a 

o si 
g° 

a 

o 
O 

CO 
CO 


39. Cancer and other malig- 
nant tumorsi of the 


40. Cancer and other malignant 
tumors of the stomach 
and liver 


41. Cancer and other malig- 
nant tumors of the 
peritoneum, intestines 
and rectum 


42. Cancer and other malig- 
nant tumors of the 
genital organs of the 
female 


43. Cancer and other malig- 

nant tumors of the 

44. Cancer and other malignant 

tumors of the skin 





PUB 

svesJi. 06 

PUB 

s.iBaA 98 
puB 

saBaX 08 
puB 

SJB3A ql 

PUB 

SaB3A 01 

PUB 

saBaA 99 

PUB 

SJB9X 09 

PUB 

saB3A 99 

PUB 

SJB9A OS 
PUB 

SJB8A 9^ 
PUB 

SaB3A Of 
PUB 

sJVdA 98 

PUB 



sa[Buia^ 



S3[BK 



J3AO 

SJBeA 06 

aapun 

saBaA s^ 

aapun 

saBaA 08 

aapun 

SaB3A 9i 

aapun 

SaBSA 0- 

japun 
SaB3A 99 

japun 
saB3A 09 
aapun 

SaBaA 2<_ 
aapun 

saBe.i qc 
aapun 

saB9A 9f 

aapun 
SJB9A ot 1 

aapun 

SJB9A 9g 

japun 
SJB9X 08 



s.iBaX 0£ aapun 

puB saBaX qz 
s.iBaA 92 aapun 

PUB SJB8A OS 

SJB8A OS aspun 

PUB SJB9A 9X 

SJB3A 9X aapun 

puB sJBaX 01 
SJB3A 01 -iapun 

PUB SJB3A 9 



s.iBaA 
9 aapun ib^ox 
sub3a 2 aapun 

puB S.lBe.V f- 

saBaX f aapun 

puB SaB9A 2 

saBaA g aapun 
puB saB3A z 

sjBa.v z aapun 

PUB JB9X i 

JBaA i aapuQ 



8T6I JOi Hn°X 



i-h (M eo 



s o 

C 



£ 



£ 9. 



- 
o 

— 
Pi 

o3 



££ 



£ £ 
£ £ 



- 



2 .£ £ 



o ^ 



S9ibui9^I 



seiBK 





J3AO 




PUB SJB9A - 06 




sib9a" 06 Japuri 




puB sjb9a" 9b 




SJT39A gg .iapun 




PUB SJB9A - OS 




sjbqA 08 -ispun 




PUB SJB9A" 92, 




SJB9A 91 aepun 




PUB SJB9A* 01 




SJB9A* 0Z, -ispun 




puB saB9A* 99 




sjb9a" 99 japun 




paB sjb?A 09 




SJB9A 09 J9pun 




PUB SJB9A" 99 




SJB9A 99 aapun 




PUB S.IB9A" OS 




saB9X 09 Japun 




PUB S.IB9A" 9f> 




SJB9A* cf, ,iepun 




PUB SJB9A" Ofr 




< 


sjb9A" ofr .ispun 


PUB SJB9A CC; 


sjb9a 9c Japun 


PUB S.IB9A" 08 




SJB9A 08 J9pun 




PUB S.IB9A" 9t 




SJB9A* qz J9pun 




PUB SJB9A* OS 




saBaA qz aapun 




pUB SJB9A* 9X 




SJB9A 91 .iapun 




PUB SJB9A I 




SJB9A" 01 •WP" n 




PUB SUB9X '. 




SJB9A" 




g aapun ib}oj. 




saB9A 9 jgpun 




PUB SUB9A f 




SJB9A" f jgpun 




PUB SJB9A" £ 




SJB9A* g J9pun 




PUB SJB9X r 




SJB9A" z J9pun 




puB aB9A x 




•IB9A" X J9pUil 



8X6X JO j IBXOj, 



"eg tO .-I 



tS H 



on 


o 




>, 






OS 


c 
ed 




9 


at 




o 


e 




> 






u 


a* 




V 


J= 




fe 






0) 


o 






c 




■— 


cfl 


© 


o 


F 


£ 


r/1 




4/ 


U 


£ 


7) 


Hi 






M 






it 






.9 






Q 







P. 

w 

C 



.9 ft 

- to 

c 



s s 



TO o 



o 



be a) 
C bo 
o to 



2 § 2 

O) Ol 



O 






X 
w 


saiBiuaji 




S91BH 






J9AO 




Pub SJB3A* 06 




a'JBaX 06 aapun 




puB saBaA" 38 




saBaA" 98 aapun 




PUB S.IB3A 08 




saBaX 08 aapun 




puB saBaA 92, 




sa^aA gi aapun 




PUB SaBaA Ql 




saBaA oi aapun 




PUB SJ-B8X 39 




saBaA gg j a pun 




puB sa-saA 09 




sjBaX 09 aspun 




Pub saBaA 39 




saBaA 39 aapun 




puB saBaA OS 




suBaA 09 ^pun 




PUB SJB8A q$ 




saB3A 9^ japun 




PUB SaB3A 0^ 





sa-BaA of' -iapun 


puB sjT.aA" S£ 


saBaA gg aapun 




puB saBaA 08 




saiaaA 08 aapun 




PUB SaBaA 92 




saBaA gs aapun 




puB saisaA OS 




sjBaA" OS aapun 




puB saBaA 91 




saBaA sx .lapun 




PUB SJBaA* OX 




saBaA 0X aapun 




puB sxBaA" s 




SJB3A - 




3 aapun ibioj. 




sa-BaX 3 aapun 




puB saisaA f 




saBaA f aapun 




pu^e saisaA g 




sa-BaA g aapun 




puB saBaA z 




sanaA z aapun 




puB a-BaA x 




aBaA x aapun 




8X61 JOj ib^oj, 


W 


h 


^ 


H ' 


Q 


fa 


O 


GQ 


fa 


cc 


£> 


<J 




O 






J5« a) 
+* X co 

5 s 

O CO 



1 = 

o- o 



i-H Tf rH 



O O 



2 fc 






ft 

S 



01 



c S 

O 0) 







«H &0 




O OS 




st: 


T3 


OS 




5P C 




3 
Vt o 


0) 
co 


+5 


OJ 


>> 


43 


X 


o 


Q 



.2 43 y 

co-^+3 
>, 0) 

I- O C 

■-H CO 

OS 
«H 

S3 



x\ 


saiBuia^ 




. 


C5 




lO 




U3 






rH 


to 


w 
72 






















IH 






co •<* 


rH 


CO 


«e 


\a 








rH 


■ 1 


saiBj\[ 




<* 


«# 




ta 










in 

rH 




J9AO 






I-H 


rH 




1-4 










CO 




Pub saBaA 06 
s?j-ea.£ 06 Japun 




























"<* 






lO 










Oi 




puB saBaX S8 
sjvbJL 58 aapun 




























•<* 


in 


CO 


to 

rH 










CO 


1 


puB SJ-esA 08 
saBaA 08 Japuri 
puB sasaA Si 


























CO 

1-4 


CO 




o 

CO 










CO 






CO 


o 


CO 


lO 










y-< 




saB9A 32, aapun 








T-t 




CO 










•># 




PUB saBaA 01 




























I-H 


oo 


CO 


■^J4 


rH 








«o 




saBaA 0A aapun 






I-H 






CO 










-5}< 




PUB SJB9^ 59 




























co 


"tf 




c- 


i-< 








o 




saBaA 59 aapun 

PUB SJB8.£ 09 








l-H 




rH 










"H4 






rH CO 


03 




CO 








rH 


IC 




saBSii 09 -lapun 




rH 






r^ 










CO 




Pub saBaA 55 
saBaA ss aapun 


— — 
























t- 


tO 




rH 










•<* 




puB saBaA OS 






























00 


o 




CO 


rH 








i-l 




saBaA OS aapun 








rH 














CO 




puB saBaA Sfr 
saBaA s^ aapun 






























co 


f 






<M 








CO 

rH 





puB saBaA 0£ 
saBaA Of aapun 


























rH 00 


«* 














CO 
rH 


PUB SaB3it ss 
























CO 


I-H 






<M 








«o 


«i 


saBaA sg aapun 

puB saBaA 08 
saBaA 08 aapun 






























CO 


rH 






-- 








lO 




puB saBaX sg 
saBaA ss .aapun 




























CO 


CO 














»o 




puB saBaA OS 
saBaX OZ aapun 






























.-1 


r-< 














CO 




puB saBaA sx 
saBaA sx aapun 

























rH 














rH 




puB saBaA 0X 
saBaA 01 aapun 




























co 


rH 














TH 




puB saBaA s 
























saBaA 






i-H 


CO 






r- 








oo 




5 aapun ib+ox 
saBaA s aapun 
















































puB saBaA f 
saBaX f- aapun 
















































puB saBaA s 
saBaA g aapun 
















































puB saBaA z 
saBaA z aapun 
















































puB aBaA x 
aBaA x JapuQ 


























T— 


t£ 






rH 






oo 






co v 


c 


0( 


3 C 


! C 


3 




i-< 


c- 


8161 JOj ibjoj, 




a 


<T 






1 r- 

4 


H 






co 

CO 




>» 






0) 




5P, e 




1 S CO* 

< 


: 04 


* '■ X 


>> • 




i* 






X 




■ .2 + 


i 


• 4J 


) • 3 


^ • 


K 


© 
re 

3 






o 




S 5 


> I 

1 i 


I rC. 

ft-. 


2 : o 


o • 

03 • 

: "3 : 


<: 

H 




u 

5 

4) 

+* s 

•** 




a 

4- 
'. t 


J 03 

<u 

; M 

o3 

i 0) 

en 

1 ^ 


tl 




3 S 

3 C 

J J 

3 r« 

3 - 1 - 


V -*H 


3 : 4*1 

3 '• «H-J 

a, 

3 03 ( 


3 ^ 



a: 


c 


03 ■!■ 

• p- ■+■ 


r 

c 
+ 
c 
c 

> £ 


H (W c 

5 oS 

i c 
J * 
5, en c 


3 « 


3 «H 

« 0) -t 

- tn •« j 

: c is 
3 to 


£ o 

2 03 


>. C ( 
- "3 .2 S 

4) +J < 

3 an o 

5 2^ 

n r* TO -t 
/3 O Sh - 

S i: 

4) t3 


1 °S 

03 

5 -4-> ft 

S E- 03 


K 
CO 

< 


a 

w 
n 


5 1 


! - 

< w o 

3 c3 

J as 

: u 


4 

! « 

; f 
'ii 


« .21 

: -4H-, 

- o 
* ,a> 


: S 

■> c 

3 •„; 

< 

1 


2 O 
- .—1 

4) 




Q 


a* pi 


I o 


< 


1 <! 


P- 


H <! 


< 


W O 






. 


t^ a 


3 en 


c 


j rH 


c 


j CO 


*& 


in «o 








I-H 


t- 


1- 


t— 


04 


3 00 





3 00 


00 


oo or 





X 
H 
GQ 


sa[Buia^ 




t-t 






00 


eo 
us 

i-H 


00 
■«* 

i-H 


eo 


OJ 










saiBj^ 




rr 


i-h t- eo oj 10 

eo eft t- 

l-H 1-H • 




OJ i-H 



< 


aaAO 

puB saBaA 06 
saBaA 06 Japun 

puB saBaA S8 
saBaA S8 Japur. 

pue saBaA 08 
saBaA 08 Japun 

puB saBaA S2, 
saBaA gi aapun 

puB saBaA oi 

sasaA 02, Japun 
puB saBaA g9 

saBaA gg aapun 
puB saBaA 09 

saBaA 09 Japun 
Pub saBaA gg 

saBaA gg aapun 
puB saBaA OS 

saBaA OS Japun 
puB saBaA qf 

saBaA Sf aapun 
puB saBaA Of 

s.iBaA of aapun 

PUB SaBOA gg 

sub&A S£ J&pun 

puB saBaA 08 
saBaA 08 J^pun 

puB saBaA gs 
saBaA gs aapun 

puB saBaA OS 
saBaA OS aapun 

puB saBaA gx 
saBaA gx aapun 

puB saBaA 0T 
saBaA 0X Japun 

puB saBaA s 






























i-i i-i eo 


















1-H OJ "«J< 1-H 


1-1 ! 
















1-H r-l rt< 
1-H 














I-l 




r-4 5© ■>* 




















OJ CO Oi 




















Oi OJ 




















1-H C- Oi 1-H 


















OJ t- o 

1-H • < 


















C- 1-H 1-H 
f-H 


















1-H lO ** OJ 1-H 
1-H OJ 
















O Oi 

1-H CO 




rH 












1-H O OJ i-H 
OJ <* 




1-H 














<X> OJ 
OJ IO 






















Oi «> 

1-H OJ 














i-H 






O 1-H rH 
1-H i-H 
















lO -^ 


















r-i i-i ^ to 












saBaA 
S aapun ibioj, 
saBaA s aapun 

puB saBaA f 
saBaA f aapun 

puB saBaA g 
saBaA g aapun 

puB sasaA z 
saBaA z aapun 

puB aBaA x 

aBaA x Japufi 




CO 


oo oj oj •"* oj 
irj no us> 

i-i 






r-i 








t- 


















i-i r-i oj m 

1-H 


















"* 


OJ 














- OJ 


CO 

1-H 


O 00 rH 
lO i-H 






i-H 




1-H 


O i-l Oi lO i-l 

tt io oj 








8X61 JOj ib^ojc 




- — lO 


O ITS «£> O 00 OJ 
«0 i-H i-H OJ 

CO CO 


OJ ' 1-H 




HH 

Eh 

< 

P 



K 

K 
tn 

< 


1 

IV. Diseases of the Respiratory 1 
Apparatus 

87. Diseases of the nasal fossae 1 


o 
• £> 

< *3 

i *£ 

3 ^ 

Z rC 
-t-> 

3 O 

a C -i 

2 .2 i 
-> +j 

J u 

z «e 
u < c 

Oi < 

X c 


? 
u 'i 

J < 

3 S 

J J 

Tj « 

a c 

J -i 

j « 

2 S 
D I 

5 p 

D i- 

1 C 


j -2 
: s= 

> I 

- — 

3 o 

c 

3 " c 

I c 
; x 

: c 

5 C 

3 ff 

H O 

i O 


1. « 

c 

I 

5 

c 

d 
« 

o 


P 

c 


13 
C 

: rt 

c 
• .2 

H-> 

. bo 
C 

o 
o 

>> 

2 § 

3 £ 

8 3 

H f>H 

1" IO 

r> oi 


1 
1 

III. Diseases of the Respiratory [ 
Apparatus — Concluded 


5 

3 
V 

H 

5 
11 

9 - 
3 < 

[ 

Ji c 


* 

- t 


>> 

H 

S3 

B 



3 

3 
a 

£ 

>. 
c 
a 
£ 

» 

3S 



X 

H 
w 


saiBuia^ 
saiBH 


T— 


CO 








^H 


o 

I— 


o 

oc 




C5 






^ OS 
00 

CO 


CO 


<r-i IQ OS 

00 


o> 






J3AO 
PUB SJBaA 06 

SJB9A" 06 -lapun 
puB sjeaA gs 

SJBaA gs Japun 
puB SJBaA 08 

sjbbA 08 Japun 
puB SJBaA" Si 

SJBaA gi japun 
puB SJBaA 02, 

SJBaA oi Japun 
puB SJBaA gg 

SJBaA g9 japun 

puB SJBaA 09 
SJBaA 09 Japun 

Pub SJBaA gg 
SJBaA gg japun 

puB SJBaA OS 
SJBaA OS Japun 

puB SJBaA g^ 
SJBaA gf> japun 

puB SJBaA o^ 
SJBaA of Japun 

puB SJBaA gg 

SJBaA gg japun 

puB SJBaA 08 
sjraA 08 ic |jar 

puB sjBaA gs 
SJBaA gs Japun 

puB SJBaA 07. 
SJBaA OS -iapun 

puB SJBaA sx 
SJBaA gx Japun 

puB SJBaA oi 
SJBaA OX J^pun 
puB SJBaA g 




o 






















to 




















l-t O 

t-H 














cm' 




<X> 

I-H 














iH 






i-( CO 














CO 




1-4 








eo 




CM 




i-H CM 

CM 












i-H 




oc 

C\l 


> 


T-H 




i-i 
















T-l 












as 






»-H i-H 












CO 








tH 












o 
io 








(M 




CM 






io 

CO 










































to 






















B9 


i-H 


















OS 






















fH 




















SJBaA 
g japun ibioj. 
sjBaA g japun 

puB SJBaA f 
SJBaA fr japun 
puB SJBaA g 

SJBaA g japun 

puB SJBaA ig 
SJBaA z Japun 

PUB JB3A x 

JBaA x Japufi 




(N 
(M 


J-H 




t- as 

CO 


00 






C- 














co 






OS 














i-H 






CO 
CO 








CM 




*tf 




— 


IO 
00 








I-H LO 

i-H 








oo 
eg 


rH 




IO 

r-H 








8I6T JOJ I-Bioj, 


CO 


CO 


CM lO Oi 

t-H tO 

1—1 


00 
i-H 






< 
H 
Q 

h 
O 
w 
H 
m 

< 


03 

0) ^ 

+> o, * 

ft e 

. rt a 

O x 

a 

<U 
^ °lc 

03 +j£ 

j- ft^ 
O 

OS 
OS 


i 

ft 
c« 

>» 

u 

o 

Rt 

u 

*s 

en 
_t 


V. Diseases of the Digestive 
Apparatus 

100. Affections of the mouth and 
its adnpxa 


> 

f- 

R 

c 
a 

«(. 

c 

.< 

c 
a 
tfc 
< 

e 


c 

. i 

a 

c 



c 
_c 

+. 

c. 

a 
5t 
< 

c\ 

c 




' -f 

a; 

1 
J 

1 

a 

c 


<« a 

°, 
t/3 a 
3 c 
o P 
+3 R 
°± 

>- R 

O 

■<* 

o 


1 

3 

i 5 

T 

3^ 

+J 

C *■ 
a; a 

a 
-3 C 

« i 

8 >■ 

s- 
2 
Q 

LO 


03 
-U 

0) 

C 

0) 

• 

B 

8 ^ 

^ «■ 

h 

2 
Q 

C3 

o 


o 

03 

■ ( - > 2 
0) c 

c p 

c5 « 
8 « 

M 

2 
Q 

CO 

o 


n 

c 

> i 

,1 

! o 
! .1 

■> 

e 

t- 



P. 

c- 

c 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
: 

J 

1 

> 



X 




w 


s-nifui, v i 


w 




sai-ejvr 




.l.i \o 




Pub SJB9X 06 




s.iBa/i 06 -iapun 




puB SJBaX gs 




s.iBaA 9s ,i,)iu''i 




PUB SJBc>A (is' 




sjBaX 08 -lapun 




puB s.iBaX Si 




s.ibsX gi japun 




puB s.iBa.f oi 




SJBaX Oi Japun 




puB sjb3a" gg 




sjBaX eg .iapun 




puB S.lBS^ 09 




s.iBaX 09 -iapun 




puB s.iBaX 55 




SJB3X eg japun 




puB s.iBaA OS 




SJBaX OS Japun 




puB sJBaA 5^ 




SJBaA 5t Japun 




puB saBaX Qf 



< 


s.iBaX o^ Japun 


puB sjBaX 58 


SJBaA se -iapun 




PUB S.1B3A 0C 




sjBaA 08 japun 




puB SJBaX qz 




sjBaX qz -iapun 




puB sJBaX 0o 




SJBaX OS Japun 




puB sJBaA Si 




s.xBaA 5i .iapun 




puB s.iBa.f oi 




sJBaA oi Japun 




puB sjb3.£ g 




s.iBa^ 




g .iapun ib'+ox 




s.iBaX s Japun 




HUB SJB3;£ f 




saBaX f japun 




puB sjBaX 2 




s.iBaX g .iapun 




puB sjb3.£ z 




s.iBaX z Japun 




puB JBaA" \ 




.iBa.? i .iapun 


8I6T JOj ibioj. 




X 




Eh 




< • 




H 




Q 




h 









02 




H 




X 




P 




< 




C 



lO r-* lO 



^H rH OJ 



; h 




O) 
J* 




o 




CO 




• .2 


CU 

> 



o — ■ 



co 


«B.S 


C 


a +* 


oJ.2 


co 

0> 






c 


CU 



O £ 



r. 
73 

X 






o .£ o 



'-2 *s 



.a a) 

CO y 

X 
CU 



CUTS 

— ■ cti 

co 

cu 

M £—. 

■r-i CU -~- 

73 CJ 73 
C CU 

2 «tt 



CU 



CO .ii — i 

.2 "c ou 

o +-> 

CU •£ 

5t! cu 

<J Oh 



co p 

O rt 

o 2 cu 

QJ P-x> 



-C co 

C O 



CU "^ 

p. 
ft 

<: 



saiBiuajj 
sa re h 

JiAO 

pu-e saBaA" 06 
saBaA 06 J9P«n 

pu-e saBaA 98 
saBaA 98 aapun 

puB saBaA 08 
sa"eaA 08 aapun 

puB saBaA 91 
sa-eaA qi aapun 

PUB SaBaA 0L 

sjbsX 01 aspun 

PUB SaB3A 99 

saB3A 29 aspun 

PUB SaB3A 09 

saB3A 09 aapun 

pui3 saBaA 99 
saBaA gg aapun 

PUB SaB3A OS 

saBaA 09 aspun 
puB saB3A 9fr 

saB3A 9^ japun 
puB saB3A 0^ 

saB3A ofr -lapun 

puB SJB3\ 9£ 

saBaA 98 aapun 
puB saBaA 08 

sa-BaA 08 aapun 

puB saB3A 92 
sa-eaA 9S Japun 

puB saB3A OS 
saB3A OS Japun 

puB Sai33A 91 
saB3A 91 aapun 

puB saB3A OX 
saB3A 01 aapun 

puB sa-esA 9 



SJB3A 

c aapun [b^ojq 

saBaX 9 aapun 

puB saBaA* f 

saB3A f japun 
puB saB3A 

saB3A 8 aapun 
puB saBaA" 

saB3A z aapun 
puB a-eaA - 

aBaA i aapun 



8X61 - 10 J Iis^Oi 



C 

*■> 
it 

u 

o< rt 

x, a 
•*> ft 



hs cs 






^3 
P. 

5 






e 
■+-> c 

CO ij 

ST* 

a; ^ 
co 



W O 



■a 



' CO 

w o 

4> "JO 

* ft 
ft rt 

o o> 

e 

to >>jS 

O" U 3 



O >> 



o 


C 




cd 


CO 

a; 

CO 


c 






co 


ri 


-a 


+j 




c 

0> 


F-i 




a> 


OJ 


ES 


* 



> s 



a> - 

Stf o> 

eS ft 

o ft 



01 



.2 « 
P P 






P z 



S K 



P co 

P 

o 
« u 

s 

p 

EH 



S3[BH 

J3AO 
PUB SJB3A* 06 

sjBaA" 06 Japun 

PUB SJBSA g§ 

s.itjaA* <js japun 

puB sjBaX 08 
S.IB9A OS Japun 

PUB SJB3A" Si 

suBaA" 51 japun 
puB sjBaA" oi 

SJB3A" oi Japun 
puB sjBaA" gg 

sjbsa" g9 japun 

PUB SJB3A" 09 

SJB3A" 09 J3pun 

Pub sjbsa" go 
sjBaA" gg aapun 

PUB SJB3A" 9 

sjBaX 09 Japun 

puB sjbsa" g^ 
sjBaA" g^ japun 

PUB SJB3A - Qf 

sjbsa" o^ Japun 

puB sjBaA" gg 
sjb3a" eg .xapun 

puB s.iBaA 08 
sjbsa" 08 -lapun 

puB sjbsA gg 
sjbsa" g& Japun 

puB sjbsa" oz 
sjbsa" OS Japun 

puB SJB3A" gx 
sjbsa" gx Japun 

puB sjbsa" 0T 
sjbsa" oi Japun 

Pub sjbsa" g 



sjbsa" 
g japun ibioj, 
sjbsa" g japun 

PUB SJB3A" f 

SJBSA" f J3pun 

PUB SJBSA" g 

SJBSA" g J3pun 

PUB SJBSA" >Z 

sjbsa" z Japun 

PUB JB3A" X 
JB3A" X J9PUJ1 



§T6T JOj iBioj, 



o <u 
■y a; 






tf 



^3 C 

L* bo 



S 3 a> 

£fty 

0) 
U3 



.S rt 

1 35 

i is 

2 S 

be C 

O Pk 



<a & _ 



o 



O O 



C c8 



S g * 

V So 



bd ft 



saiBuia^ 

J9A0 

pu-B saBaA 06 
sj-eaA 06 -i9pun 
pu-e saBaA gg 

ssiedA 58 aapun 

puB saBaA 08 
saBaX 08 Japun 

PUB SJB8A 92, 

saBaA qi aapun 

PUB S.I-B9X 01 

saBaA oi Japun 

puB sa"B9ii 39 
saBaX 59 aapun 

PUB SJH9A 09 

saB9A 09 Japun 

Pub saBa.£ 55 
SJB9X 55 aapun 

PUB S.I-B9A 09 

S.TB9A 09 Japun 

PUB SJB9A q$ 

SJT39A qf J9pun 

PUB SJB9A Qf 

saBaA Qf Japun 

PUB SJB9X gg 

SJB9A 9g aapun 

PUB SJB9A 0C 

SJB9A 08 J9pun 

PUB S.IB9A qZ 

SJB9A 92 aapun 

PUB SJB9A OS 

saBaA oz aapun 

pUB SJB9A q\ 

SJB9X 9x aapun 

PUB SJB9X 01 

saBaA oi Japuri 

puB sjBaA 9 



pjBaA 
c aapun iBioj, 
sjBaA 9 aapun 
puB saBa^C f 

saBaA f aapun 
puB saBaX g 

saBaA g aapun 
puB saBaA z 

saBaA z aapun 

PUB IB9X i 

JB9^ x aapun 



8X61 JOj ibjox 



ca 



u o 
<vo 
ft 

3 * 
ft? 
3 
>* cn 
0> 



ca us 



3 

e h 
ee 



be 

c 

oi 
O 






c 

in 
3 
I* 



* 

c 
o 

£ 

* 

s 



S3 

O a; 

c 

tn •— 

C 
Jh 73 



C 
<d ca 
3 bo 
tfi v. 

•2 o 



x.S 



i— ■ a ™ 



DO 



M 



2 cc 

^ o 



I -a 



id - ca 

fc o £ 
ca-- a 

_£ 3t 
O +J-3 

"° rt ca'Q 
c a 

X, 



X! 
H 
02 


saiBiuaj[ 






00 r 


ce 


•*» 




e 

CC 


c 




saiBj\[ 






Tf ^H O CO 

»-H 00 


to 00 

00 


• 

H 
O 
<! 


jaAO 
puB SJBaA 06 
SJB9A" 06 Japun 
pus sjBa.v gs 

SJBaA gg .iepun 

puB sJBaX OS 
sjea.v OS -irpun 

puB SJBaA 92, 
sjBa.v gi japun 

puB SJBaA Oi 
SJBaA" oi aapun 

pus SJBaA 99 
SJBaA gg japun 

puB SJBaA 09 
SJBaA 09 Japun 

Pub SJBaA 55 
SJBaA gg japun 

pus SJBaA OS 
SJBaA 09 Japun 

puB SJBaA ej. 

SJBaA gf- japun 

puB SJBaA 0£ 
sj-BaA of Japun 

puB SJBaA gg 
SJBaA eg japun 

puB SJBaA 08 
SJBaA 08 Japun 

PUB SJBaA qz 
SJBaA gs Japun 

puB SJBaA OS 
SJBaA OS Japun 

puB SJBaA gx 
SJBaA gx Japun 

puB SJBaA oi 
SJBaA oi Japun 

puB SJBaA c 


















^ 


















\a 


















CM 


















00 






'. '"' 




























1-1 












































































































































































































tH 


















i— 1 














SJBaA 
5 japun i^ioj, 
SJBaA g japun 

puB sj^aA f 
SJBaA f japun 

PUT3 SJB3A g 

SJBaA g japun 

puB SJBaA z 
sj'eaA z Japun 
puB JBaA x 
JBaA x J^puQ 






■^ CM CO © 
CM PO iH 


CO 

■«* 

1—1 








• i— i 
















I-H 




































r-l 00 


















CM 00 


oo 


© 


CO 




8I6T •">! ibjox 






C- CM 
CM 


eo ® 


CO CM 

•* i-H 




CAUSES OF DEATH 


c 
_o 

'-*J 
es 

+-> 
3 
ft 

£ 

< 

oo 

i-H 


1 

Vi . 

o . 

o £ 
o 

in o 

c.2 
o 

— «-l 

s> ° 

0) 

St: ti 
c« C 

- be 

OI. 
A 

■*-> 

o 


o ; 

£ • 

o • 

£ '• 

to ! 
c . 

eS . 

be • 

u ■ 

o • 

5c 
o o 
HS3 


X. Malformations 

150. Malformations, congenital, 
(still births excepted) . . 


XI. Early Infancy 

151. Congenital debility, icterus 
and sclerema 


152. Other diseases appertaining 
to infancy 


o 

Sh 

cfl 

CJ 

o 

o 
S 
H 

00 

no 


Total early infancy .... 
XII. Old Age 
154. Senile debilitv 


1 



DQ 


S9IBUI9 L iI 


i-H 


; 






: 


: 








i-H 




l-H l-H 






S9JBH 


CM <N 




1-1 T-( 






00 


eo 




H 


< 


J9AO 
PUB SJB3A" 06 

SJB9A" 06 Japun 

PUB SJB3A" 98 

SJB9A" gs Japun 

PUB SJB9A" 08 

sjBaA 08 J9pun 

PUB SJB9A" 9i 

SJB9A 92, japun 

PUB SJB9A" 02, 

SJB9A 01 japun 

puB SJ-BaA" 99 
sjBaA" 99 japun 

PUB SJB9X 09 

SJB3A" 09 Japua 

Pub sjBaA 99 
sjBaA gg japun 

PUB SJB3A - OS 

sJBaA OS Japun 

PUB SJB3A" 9^ 

SJB3X q\, japun 

PUB SJB3A - Qf 

SJB9A Qf japun 

PUB sjbga" gg 
SJB9A" gg aapun 

PUB SJB3A" 08 

sjb3A OS japun 

PUB SJB3A - qZ 

sjBaA gg Japun 

PUB SJB3A* OS 

sjBaA qz J3pun 
puB sJBaA 9x 

sjBaA gx Japun 

puB sjbsa* oi 

SJB9A oi Japun 

PUB SJB9A" g 
























•* 




























l-H • 
























1-H 


i-l • 














1"H 












T* 




























i-l (M 






















. ; 




■rjt 1-1 


























l-H • 




























Tjt 








i-i 














rH 


<M i-H 






i-H 








— - 






<N 


^i 




i-H 














CN 


CO i-H 




















tH 


(M 




i-i 


















«C <M 




r-4 








r-i 






i-i 


CO 









. 




: — 








: — 


: — 


IH 




i-H 


























co 




























& oa 




SJB9A" 

g japun Ib^oj, 
sjbsa" g japun 

PUB SJB3A" f 

SJB3A f japun 

PUB SJB3A" g 

SJB3A g japun 

PUB SJB3A" ig 

sjBaA z japun 
puB JBaA x 

JB9A" X J3pUf] 
























eo ?c> 


























l-H 


























l-H l-H 


























i-H i-H 


























i-H CM 


























i-H 




8T6I -ioj ibioj, 


eo (M 




i-H ?H 






OI 


lO i-H 




•r 1 

HH 

H 

< 

Q 

o 

w 
H 
in 

p 

< 


i 

M 

a 
>> 

-o 
5 

s r 

to — 

B ci > 

.2 B •* 

■C >- fl 
0> +■> t 

sts '( 
«! '; 

HH 

x If 


! l > 

3 o 

3. C 

•> 5 
3 ^ 

J C 

3 ^ 
J i 

3 '; 

2 a 

5 V 
5 If 


'. o 
■ be 

: c 

, 'S 

3 c 

< 3 t 
*> * i 

1 ll 

! _3 

3 ~3 

2 W 

•> C^ 

5 in 


j 

i 
i 

I i 

3 ! 

3 [ 

I J 

I 3 

c 



u 


j 

« t 

5 ! 
I \ 

6 i 

L> ( 

3 7 

6 c 


-t-> 

to 

: c 

o be 

5 C 

i i 

? £4 

3 i 

B O) 5 

3 2 I 
i !5 

3 *3 
2 W 

B O 

5 «5 


: £ 

o 
u 

'• be 
; _C 

■ 'ft 

: s 

. 3 

( 
( 

13 ^ ' 
3 J 

5 o»„ 

]« 

3 
W 

i—i 

5£> 


• j 

J 



u : 
j j 

3 < 

s •< 

c 

c 

«1 


f s 

5 ] 

u 

3 1 
5 J 

5 c 

j 

3 11 




u 
3 

3 

H 


j ' 

1 ■ 

3 

. 

3 «. 


to 

: S 

to 

: S 

3 
eS 

u 

• H r < 

0) 

2 w 

o 

3 sj 

3 O P 

9 tO t 

5 ID 5. 


< 

< 
S 

c 

c 

; ; 

I 

§ J 

3 ! 

° i 
< 

3 < 

3 j 

n 

3 I 

H 1 

3 

Q P 

- 

t 


3 
) 

8 
rj 

3 


D 

> 



s 

H 
H 

3 

J 

>> 

3 

a 

H 

3 

6 

5 



X 
H 

GQ 


i 
sajBUia^ 


- 










eo 




eo 
co 


T"H 


IC 


«£> 


T-H 

© 
CM 


saiBK 


m 


T"H tO 






1/5 iC CM 

t- 

CM 

T-H 



< 


J3AO 

puB SJBaA 06 
SJBaA 06 Japun 

puB SJBaA gs 
SJBaA gs -lapun 

puB SJBaA 08 
SJBaA 08 Japun 

puB SJBaA gi 

sjBaA gi, japun 

puB SJBaA 01 
SJBaA oi japun 

puB SJBaA gg 
SJBaA g9 Japun 

puB SJBaA 09 
SJBaA 09 Japun 

puB SJBaA gg 
SJBaA gg japun 

puB SJBaA OS 
SJBaA OS Japun 

puB SJBaA gfc 
SJBaA gt japun 

puB SJBaA Qf 

SJBaA Ofr Japun 
puB SJBaA g? 

SJBaA gg japun 
ptiB SJBaA OS 

SJBaA OS Japun 
puB SJBaA gs 

SJBaA cz Japun 
puB SJBaA QZ 

SJBaA 6 Japun 
puB SJBaA gx 

SJ.B3A gx Japun 
puB SJBaA oi 

SJBaA oi Japun 

puB SJBaA g 


T-H • 












1-H 








Oi 
















rH 
























CM 








to 
















irt 








IM 

Oi 
















eo 








Ci 












t-H 




eo 








o 
eo 

T-H 












t-H i— ( 


eo 








T-H 

CO 
rH 












*"* 




to 


rH 


T-H Ci 
T-H 
T-H 












t-H 




to 






CO 
Oi 
















c- 




rH rH O 

T-H 














rH OO 




rH rH «£> 
CM 

T-H 












rH 


CM t© 








CM 

rH 


— 












rH © 








o 

7-\ 


T-H 






rH 00 




i-< rH O 












t-H 




lO 








o 

T-H 
















1-1 






Oi 


— 


: — 


; 


■<* 


: : — 




E- 

T—l 

rH 


: — 


: 


: 


CO 


sjBaA 
g japun moj, 
SJBaA g aapun 

puB SJBaA f 
SJBaA ^ japun 

puB SJBaA g 
SJBaA g .iapun 

puB SJBaA z 
SJBaA z Japun 

puB JBaA x 

JBaA x Japun 


lO 


; 




1 


T-H 




t- 

T-H 




c- t- t- 


— 


-—- 


1 






CO 


















<M 








o 

co 












rH 




CO 




T-H T-t Oi 


O 


i 












lO 




i-t rH C5 

T-H 


CO 












■f 




ic its \a 
eg 


8T6I JOj ibiox 


to 


rH t© 


t- t-H lO CM 

• r-H 

rH 


rH O rH ■ CO 

i—l rH t- 

-<* 

CM 




< 
B 


w 
o 

w 
w 

< 


C 

+ 


1 

It 

C 

►— 

a 


i 

c 

s 

s- 
1* 

c 
c- 

T- 






t 

c 

a 

s- 

-*- 
a 

'. X 

° j 

t 

> t 

> a 

E 

«~ 
t- 

l- 


! e 
c 
'3 

! J. 

a 

! E 

X 

5 

c 

*■ 
c 
a 

X 

1 

< 

t- 

r- 


c 

c 

+ 

E 

B 

n 

c 

r- 


174. Absorption of deleterious 
gases (suicide excepted) 


) Q 
«■ 

: e 

c 

; .1 
> 

! 1 

i * 
i a 

i S- 

> a 

j X 

> C 

i tC 
< 7- 


XIV. Ill-defined Diseases 

177 rirnncr 


-*- 

Q 

I a 

5 ^ 

ex 

H _ 


• T3 

a* 
3 

• «3 

0) 

: x! 

; ^ j 

c 

>H 

OT 

; T3 C 

i 0J 
) tC ci 
j — > a 

ai f 

: a c 

! i 

i Z 

j ci 
i — i 


1 

CO 

; 'd 
• -d 

0) 

' rS 

' 7 

> 



3 C 

J 75 ° 

TO 
i tH 


to 

V 

: 3 

a 

u 

"3 
: e 

o 

u 

3 r® 

; 



50 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



COLLECTION OF ASHES, 1918 

January 2,882 loads 

February 2,669 

March 2,905 

April 3,207 

May 2,650 

June 1,923 

July 2,099 

August 2,214 

September 1,968 

October 2,116 

November 2,263 

December 3,294 



30,190 



COLLECTION OF SWILL, 1918 

January 339 loads 

February ' 286 

March 292.% 

April 272% 

May 313% 

June 290V 2 

July 338 

August 399 V 2 

September 401 % 

October 356 

November 211 

December 252 



3752 



623 loads of Market Refuse were collected in 1918. 
715 loads of paper were collected in 1918. 



HOARD OF HEALTH. 51 



SWILL ACCOUNT, 1918 

January $333.76 

February 278.76 

March 293.80 

April 286.88 

May 331.91 

June 294.40 

July 339.43 

August 415.67 

September 428.78 

October 354.41 

November 209.40 

December 255.04 

Swill Licenses 550.00 



1,372.24 



698 V 2 loads of Swill were charged to the City Farm in 1918 
108 Swill Licenses were issued during the year 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT— EXPENDITURES 

PAYROLLS— OFFICE 

January $ 961.68 

February 972.19 

March 1,343.57 

April 988.16 

May . . 980.16 

June 1,236.20 

July 1,095.01 

August 1,424.80 

September 1,139.84 

October 1,766.39 

November 1,424.80 

December 1,241.44 



$14,574.24 



* This includes $566.55 for wages at Influenza- 
Emergency Hospital. 



52 BOARD OF HEALTH. 



PAYROLLS— YARD 



January $ 5,444.59 

February 5,624.10 

March 7,059.60 

April 5,133.44 

May 5,303.59 

June 6,328.57 

July 6,058.56 

August 7,502.64 

September 5,829.14 

October 5,471.12 

November 6,267.83 

December . 6,930.92 



$72,954.10 



ANALYSIS OF OFFICE AND YARD 
PAYROLLS OF 1918 

OFFICE 

Agent $ 1,957.48 

Fumigator 1,222.80 

Tenement House Inspector 1,496.07 

Tuberculosis Physician 366.69 

Looking Up Settlements 70.00 

Plumbing Inspector 1,476.27 

Meat Inspector 985.41 

Vaccinating Physician 378.69 

Health Inspector 1,187.40 

Tuberculosis Nurse 871.39 

Contagion Inspector 1,584.20 

Registrar 1,060.54 

Child Welfare Nurses (2) 862.99 

Special Police (Smallpox Epidemic) viS.OO 

Wages during Smallpox Quarantine 166.76 

Nurse at Smallpox Hospital 228.00 

Emergency Clerk (Influenza Epidemic) ... 60.00 

Wages at Influenza-Emergency Hospital . . . 566.55 

Board of Health (3 Members) 1,500.00 

Bacteriologist's Salary 583.31 

$16,657.55 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 



63 



YARD 

Ashes $37,629.24 

Swill <w 14,537.15 

Dumps and Alleys 5,823.31 

Stable 3>900.98 

Foreman 1,700.00 

Blacksmith and Helper 2,410.83 

Market Refuse 1,786.11 

Yardman 1,270.50 

Wheelwright 1,196.42 

Smallpox 304.00 

Cleaning Harnesses 48.00 

Putting Out fires on dump 3.81 

Vacations 2,343.75 



$72,954.10 



ANALYSIS OF BILLS, 1918 

.OFFICE SUNDRIES 

Advertising $ 75.94 

Bacteriological Laboratory 565.03 

Express 34.32 

Fumigating Supplies 205.50 

Investigating Deaths : 116.00 

Printed Supplies 195.25 

Printing Annual Report 118.90 

Stamps and Envelopes 173.50 

Sundries 175.15 

Traveling Expenses 12.98 

Telephone 15.55 

Use of auto 117.00 

Trip Book 24.30 

Car Tickets 383.00 

New Coupe 5.00 

Looking up settlements 8.00 

Baby Hygiene Nurses' Supplies 28.67 

Vaccinating 40.00 

Compensation during U. S. Service 201.80 

(Office Expenses) 



$2,495.89 



54 BOAR13 OF HEALTH. 

Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary 25.00 

Medicine 11.05 

Medical Services 189.50 

Smallpox Expenses 868.16 

Lowell Hospital . . 84.00 

Lynn City of 15.00 

Fuel 3.00 

Provisions 7.00 

Worcester City of 35.86 

Tewksbury State Infirmary 162.00 

(Expenses other contagious diseases 

besides Tuberculosis) $1,400.57 

Carpenter Work $ 13.11 

Catering 1,494.37 

Coal 1,036.62 

Lunches 25.55 

Medicine and Medical Supplies 445.64 

Gas 72.80 

Water 10.33 

Ice 9.00 

Printed Supplies 212.43 

Provisions 383.83 

Paper Towels .•. . . 13.00 

Hardware 22.35 

Stationers' Supplies 63.24 

Dry Goods and Furnishings • • • • 555.10 

Nursing Services (Wages at hospital) 65.08 

Plumbing 45.20 

Use of Typewriter 4.00 

Sundries 11.20 

Nursing 31.71 

Record Boxes 26.00 

Transportation 29.00 

Laundry 279.14 

Tables 150.00 

Sputum Cup Holders 32.40 

Lowell Gen. Hospital for nursing services 154.24 

Repairing Auto 24.45 

Lowell Gen. Hospital for board and treatment of 

patients 350.00 

Telephone 31.26 

Police Department Services 310.00 

Electric Light 60.18 

St. John's Hospital, for nursing services 112.75 

(Influenza Epidemic Expenses) $6,073.98 



BOARD OF HEALTH 55 

Burials 25.80 

Chelmsford St. Hospital 545.76 

Clinton Town of 580.40 

Clinic Supplies .30 

Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 666.57 

Medical Services 51.00 

Blackstone Town of 2.00 

Medicine 81.60 

Westfield State Sanatorium 1,839.67 

Provisions 1,279.32 

Tewksbury State Infirmary 900.00 

Peabody, Town of 282.43 

Cambridge, City of 534.00 

St. John's Hospital 9.00 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital 40.50 

Lynn, City of 487.07 

No. Reading State Sanatorium 2,869.72 

Rutland State Sanatorium 513.14 

Traveling Expenses 55.48 

Lakeville State Sanatorium 167.99 

Sputum Cups and Fillers 84.34 



(Tuberculosis Expenses) 11,016.09 



Total Office Sundries $20,986.53 



56 BOARD. OF HEALTH 

YARD SUNDRIES, 1918 

Blacksmith's Supplies $ 308.43 

Canvas Covers 182.00 

Compensation during War Service 322.35 

Corn and Meal 451.69 

Coal 388.83 

Gas ■. . r 74.07 

Hay 6,872.46 

Hardware 222.91 

Electric Light 93.44 

Salt 28.20 

Laundry 400.75 

Oats 7,936.65 

Printed Supplies 27.00 

Straw 436.82 

Harness Repairing and Supplies 377.28 

Leather 20.80 

Sundries 101.97 

Telephone 8.75 

New Tires 27.75 

Veterinary Services 55.50 

Use of horses 2,359.50 

Water ' 179.74 

New Horses 1,225.00 

Repairing Carriage 64.85 

Locks and Canals 32.72 

Brooms 20.00 



$22,219.46 



MILK DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES, 1918 

Milk inspector $1,733.32 

Collector of Samples 1,059.09 

$2,792.41 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 57 



SUNDRIES 



Express $ 1.97 

Inspection Babcock Machine 3.10 

Traveling Expenses 24.54 

Telephone 57.90 

Motor Hire 8.70 

Sundries 11.40 

Glassware 76.81 

Transportation 1.73 

Corks 28.70 

Milk Samples 1.42 



$216.27 



INCOME TRANSFERRED TO GENERAL FUND, 1918 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Swill Sold $3,822.24 

Swill Licenses 550.00 

$4,372.24 

Cash paid by patients at Influenza Hospital for board 378.05 

Sale of Platinum 19.01 

Towm of Arlington 110.00 

Commonwealth of Mass. , 2,008.56 

Bay State St. Ry. Co., for horse 325.00 

Boston, City of 8.57 



$7,221.43 



MILK DEPARTMENT 
Milk and Oleomargarine Licenses $244.50 



58 BOARD OF HEALTH. 

COST OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 1918 

EXPENDITURES 

Salaries of Board < $1,500.00 

Salary of Bacteriologist 583.31 

Payrolls, Office 14,574.24 

Bills, Office 20,986.53 

Yard Labor 72,954.10 

Yard Sundries 22,219.46 

Milk Department Salaries 2,792.41 

Milk Department Sundries 216.27 

Medical Inspection Private Schools 800.00 



$136,626.32 



APPROPRIATIONS 

Health Office, Salaries $ 17,500.00 

Health Office, Sundries 12,500.00 

Yard Labor 70,000.09 

Yard Sundries 18,000.00 

Milk Department Salaries 2,566.00 

Milk Department Sundries 734.00 

Medical Inspection Private Schools 800.00 

$122,100.00 

Additional Appropriations 19,617.45 

Department Transfers 782.52 

Receipts 4.00 

Credit Transfer 2,000.00 



$144,503.97 
Debit Transfer 2,000.00 



$142,503.97 
Balance on hand, Dec. 31, 1918 5,877.65 



$136,626.32 



01 T3 

5 * 



H C 

01 

ft 



rt O 

.2 2 

< a 
p. 
< 



K 



< 
g 



0) C 



-a IS 
« C 



Q § 



5 


g 


P 




'C 





01 




a 


&H 


> 




o 


-w 


0) 




ft 




« 




ft 








< 




O 

o 








H 


'/J 






H 


fH 






hJ 


£ 






,<J 


"3 






H 


03 






w 





K 



B3 


a 


>, 


o 


a 


eg 


pq 


PQ 


Ph 



o 
o 


o 
o 




o 
© 


o 
o 






o 
© 


© 


© 




«o 

CO 


CO 






© 

o 


o 

o 


o^ 




ua 


t- 






'00 


o 


oo" 




N 










t- 


T-H 


H 
S 

<< 






o 


O 

o 












O 


K 












H 


O 






Ph 

< 


to 




tf 


Ph 


CO 




>H 


01 


Ph 


03 
.2 


_a 




< 


^o 




1 3 

1 02 


Q 


03 


p 
a 


g 

1 


> 

5 

Ph 


03 


H 




»— i 






w 






H 




S 






§ 







60 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 















Taxation 






Popula- 








City's 


per 


Year 




tion 


Expenditures 


Revenue 


Net Cost 


Valuation 


Capita 


1894 




83,026 


$a57,073.73 


$318.43 


$56,755.03 


$69,091,536 


.63 


1895 




84,359 


46,324.04 


570.80 


45,753.24 


68,885,732 


.54 


1896 




85,700 


45,587.11 


265.57 


45,321.54 


69,910,472 


.53 


1897 




87,000 


48,551.84 


2,369.99 


46,181.85 


70,389,280 


.53 


1898 




87,000 


41,026.78 


3,229.02 


37,779.76 


70,977,303 


.43 


1899 




90,114 


40,830.23 


3,796.05 


37,034.18 


71,255,587 


.41 


1900 




94,969 


b46,266,ll 


3,647.03 


42,619.00 


71,529,515 


.44 


1901 




94,969 


46,673.41 


4,585.26 


42,088.15 


71,674,588 


.44 


1902 




95,574 


c54,815.33 


6,103.87 


48,711.46 


71,903,757 


.48 


1903 




101,959 


d46,168.01 


4,085.12 


42,682.89 


72,004,028 


.41 


1904 




104,402 


e46,451.97 


4,137.31 


42,314.66 


71,614,907 


.40 


1905 




94,889 


f51,707.39 


3,727.41 


47,979.98 


71,645,718 


.50 


1906 




96,380 


54,096.00 


4,566.66 


49,529.34 


74,325,775 


.51 


1907 




96,380 


57,763.79 


6,808.20 


50,955.59 


76,079,750 


.53 


1908 




96,380 


g57,342.61 


6,418.50 


50,924.11 


77,858,891 


.53 


1909 




96,380 


56,346,33 


6,763.73 


h49,582.60 


79,176,837 


.51 


1910 




106,294 


h65,911.31 


h6,770.56 


h59, 140.75 


80,094,803 


.56 


1911 




106,294 


i73,425.97 


i6,762.36 


i66,663.61 


82,166,742 


.62 


1912 




106,294 


j74,136.25 


j7.031.59 


j67,104.66 


84,797,348 


.63 


1913 




106,294 


k91,635.29 


7,042.53 


84,592.76 


87,277,643 


.80 


1914 




106,294 


182,448.34 


8,040.56 


74,407.78 


89,294,001 


.70 


1915 




106,294 


m88,841.59 


6,492.16 


82,349.43 


92,716,047 


.77 


1916 




107,978 


n94,305.92 


7,112.16 


87,193.76 


94,503,423 


.80 


1917 




107,978 


ol04,327.19 


7,379.26 


96,947.93 


90,820,901 


.90 


1918 




107,978 


pl3G,626.32 


7,465.93 


129,160.39 


98,939,125 


1.19 


a. 


Smallpox 


and Swil 


Cremation, 


$12,708.25. 








b. 


Smallpox, 


$4,73-9.67 












c. 


Smallpox, 


6,626.20 












d. 


Smallpox, 


1,000.00 












e. 


Smallpox, 


1,010.02 












f. 


Smallpox, 


3,297.08 












g- 


Smallpox, 


291.64 












h. 


This includes expen 


ditures and revenue of Milk Dept. 






J. 
k. 
1. 






*' " 


« 


" also Smallpox 




m. 
n. 
o. 
P- 






* • if 


<< 


„ „ 


a 





INDEX 



Organization 3 

Report 5 

Report of Examining Physician for Tuberculosis Clinic 6 

Report of Tuberculosis Nurse 7 

Report of Child Welfare for 1918 9 

Influenza 10 

Inspector of Milk 16 

Inspector of Meats and Provisions 17 

Medical Inspection Private School, 1918 17 

Report of Plumbing Inspector 18 

Report of Tenement House Inspector 19 

Report of Fumigator 21 

Report of work done in Bacteriological Labatory during year of 1918 ... 22 

Typhoid Fever 23 

Malaria 23 

Cerebra-Spinal Meningitis 23 

Anthrax 23 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 23 

Cases of Contagious Diseases Reported 24 

Deaths from Contagious Diseases 24 

Cases of Diphtheria Reported to the Board of Health 1918 24 

Mortality of Diphtheria 25 

Scarlet Fever , 26 

Measles 26 

Infantile Paralysis 27 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 27 

Tuberculosis 28 

Typhoid Fever 28 

Typhoid Fever, 1890-1919 29 

Vital Statistics 30 

Birthplace 3o 

Places of Interment 30 

Places of Death 31 

Death Rate 32 

Mortality Report for 1918 33 

Collection of Ashes, 1918 50 



INDEX (CONTINUED) 



Collection of Swill 1918 50 

Swill Account, 1918 61 

Financial Statement, Expenditures, Payrolls of Office 51 

Payrolls of Yard 52 

Analysis of Office and Yard Payrolls of 1918, Office 52 

Yard 53 

Analysis of Bills, 1918, Office Sundries 53 

Yard Sundries 56 

Milk Department, Salaries 1918 56 

Sundries 57 

Income Transferred to General Fund 1918, Health Department 57 

Milk Department . . . 57 

Cost of Health Department, 1918, Expenditures 58 

Appropriations ... 58 

Summary 1918 59 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



FIRE COMMISSIONER 

OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 
CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE YEAR 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN 



REPORT 



LOWELL, MASS., January 1, 1919. 

TO THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
LOWELL : 

GENTLEMEN: — I herewith submit the seventh annual report 
of the Commissioner of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31st, 1918. 

The following statement will show the receipts and ex- 
penditures for the year : 

RECEIPTS 

Appropriation $215,000.00 

Balance from 1917 1,633.14 

Extra appropriation for increase from 

July 1 18,300.00 

Transfer 200.00 

Transferred from general treasury. . . . 2,097.60 

$237,230.74 

EXPENDITURES 

Fire Alarm $2,679.64 

Automobiles and repairs of same 6,485.13 

Chemicals 213.57 

Coal and wood 4,942.60 

Furniture and bedding 400.44 

Hose 1,233.43 

Freight and express 32.96 

Harness repairs 101.00 

Hay and grain 7,841.80 

Horses 1,750.00 

Laundry 940.37 

Lighting 2,101.04 

Printing and stationery. 196.60 

Repairs 293.26 

Shoeing 1,145.47 

Soap 207.20 

Sundries 1,949.05 

Telephone 333.98 

Veterinary 118.50 



Wagon repairs 842.45 

Water bills '. 530.15 

$34,338.64 

Salaries and wages 202,892.10 

$237,230.74 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATION 

Appropriated in 1917 for Triple Combination $6,000.00 

Expended in 1918 for Triple Combination $6,000.00 

Details of the general work of the department will be found in 
the Chief's report which follows. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE H. BROWN, 



CHIEFS REPORT 



Chief's Office. ('(Mitral Fire Station, 
Lowell, January 1, 1919. 
To the Commissioner of Water Works and Fire Protection of the 
City of Lowell. 

Dear Sir: In compliance with the City ordinance, I have the 
honor of submitting for your consideration the annual report of 
the condition and operation of the Fire Department for the year 
ending December 31st, 1918. 

Salaries of Members of the Fire Department. 

Chief Engineer $2,500.00 per annum 

1st Assistant Chief 5.75 per day 

2nd Assistant Chief 5.25 per day 

3rd Assistant Chief 4.75 per day 

Assistant Engineer : 450.00 per annum 

Call Men 250.00 per annum 

Permanent Men 4.00 per day 

Captains of Companies (permanent) 4.50 per day 

Lieutenants of Companies (permanent) 4.25 per day 

Engineers of Steamers (permanent) 4.25 per day 

Electrician 4.75 per day 

Linemen 29.50 per week 

FORGE 

The Department is divided into two classes, Permanent and 
Call. The Permanent force consists of: 
1 Chief Engineer 9 Patrolmen 

3 District Chiefs 1 Chauffeur 

1 Fire Inspector 3 Drivers 

1 Fire Alarm Operator 81 Hosemen 

3 Linemen . 29 Laddermen 

3 Telephone Operators 4 Engineers of Steamers 

A total of 149, of which 21 are Captains and 26 Lieutenants. 



The Call force consists of: 

1 Assistant Engineer 
3 Laddermen 
9 Hosemen 
A total of 13. 

This makes a total of 162, divided into companies as follows : 
6 Steam Fire Engine Companies. 

6 Horse Hose Companies, 1 with Chemical Engine attached. 
4 Hook and Ladder Companies, 1 with Chemical Engine at- 
tached. 
1 Protective Company. 

CHANGES DURING THE YEAR 

Appointed permanent 4 

Appointed permanent from call force . 4 

Appointed provisionally (electrician) 1 

Assigned permanent from reserve force 10 

Died, permanent 2 

Died, call 1 

Died, pensioners 5 

Promoted 15 

Resigned from call force 1 

Resigned from permanent force 1 



APPARATUS 

The apparatus of this department is kept in the best possible 
condition and consists at present of 

Chief \s Automobile 1 

Asst. Chiefs' Automobiles 2 

Electrician's Automobile 1 

Combination Motors, Chemical and Hose Wagons. . . 5 

Triple Combinations 2 

Auto Patrol Wagon 1 

Service Car 1 

Steam Fire Engines 5 

Two Horse Hose Wagons 6 

Ladder Trucks 4 

Chemical Engines 2 

Hale Water Tower 1 

Fuel Wagons 8 

Hose Pungs 3 

Fire Extinguishers ., 30 

6 



RESERVE APPARATUS 

Electrician's Wagon 1 

Electrician's Sleigh 1 

1 Qspector of Repairs' Wagon 1 

Two Horse Hose Wagons 3 

Ladder Truck 1 

HORSES 

There are at the present time in the service of the department 
thirty-eight horses. 

HARNESS 

The harness in use in the department at the present time con- 
sists as follows : 

Sets of double swinging harness 9 

Sets of three horse swinging: harness 6 

TELEPHONE 

The telephone system is the same that was installed in 1913, 
consisting* of one thirty line switchboard located at the Palmer 
Street Station, which is connected with the central office of the 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Company by two toll 
lines, and also the seventeen different fire stations, the Chief's 
office and residence, the two District Chiefs' residences and bat- 
tery room with eleven local lines. 

PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT 

This department is maintained by the City and consists of nine 
permanent men. The}' have responded to tw T o hundred and 
seventy-five alarms ; in service one hundred and thirty-six and 
three-quarters hours ; spread one hundred and seventy-three 
covers ; used eighty-two extinguishers and forty-five tanks ; raised 
three hundred, and ninety feet of ladders. 

FIRE PREVENTION. 
A systematic inspection of buildings is made by the members 
of the Fire Department in order to relieve the fire hazard of tin- 
city. Each company has a certain district to inspect, and each 
inspection is recorded on a printed slip with report of conditions 
found. These slips are turned over to the Chief of the Depart- 
ment, and, when the conditions found are considered dangerous, 
letters are sent to both owners and tenants to have said conditions 
remedied. 13,354 buildings were inspected during the year by 
the different companies. 



y 



. FIRES AND LOSSES. 

The whole number of alarms during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31st, 1918 was one thousand and forty-seven (1047). Two 
hundred and twenty-nine (229) were given from signal boxes; 
four hundred and three (403) telephones; two hundred and 
twenty-one (221) stills; twenty-two (22) automatics; thirteen 
(13) exposures; and one hundred and fifty-nine (159) reported 
fires. The "No School" signal was given sixteen (16) times. 
There were four hundred and nine (409) fires extinguished by 
chemicals alone and one hundred and eighty-three (183) where 
water was used. The remaining number were extinguished by 
other means or had been put out before the arrival of the de- 
partment. Ninety-three (93) were in brick or stone buildings; 
three hundred and thirty-seven (337) in frame buildings, and 
four hundred and fifty-eight (458) other than building fires. 
The reported fires were mostly in frame buildings. 

The whole amount of loss, except the reported fires, was one 
hundred and ninety-five thousand, five hundred twenty-nine dol- 
lars and ninety-two cents ($195,529.92). Insurance, one mil- 
lion two hundred forty-six thousand, one hundred fifty-five dol- 
lars ($1,246,155) ; insurance paid, one hundred fifty-seven thou- 
sand, eight hundred fortyone dollars and forty-one cents ($157,- 
841.41). Loss above insurance, thirty-seven thousand, six hun- 
dred eighty-eight dollars and fifty-one cents ($37,688.51). Valu- 
ation, one million three hundred ninety-two thousand, two hun- 
dred fifty-four dollars ($1,392,254). The reported loss was four 
thousand ninety-nine dollars and thirty cents ($4,099.30); in- 
surance, four hundred fifty-four thousand, three hundred sixty- 
three dollars ($454,363) ; valuation, four hundred ninety-nine 
thousand, five hundred dollars ($499,500). 

There have been ten (10) alarms out of the city, to which some 
part of the department has responded, for which no insurance 
are kept; Dracut, 4, East Billerica 1, No. Chelmsford 1, Tewks- 
bury 4. 

There have been twenty-one (21) fires Avhere the loss was 
$1,000 and over. 

January 14th, 71 New Spaulding Street owned by P. McAn- 
drew and occupied by T. J. McAndrews, loss $1,200. 

January 24th, 463 Market Street owned and occupied by 
Nicholas Spyropoulos, loss $1,598.50. 

January 24th, 61 Rock Street owned and occupied by C. II. 
Hanson & Company, loss $43,520.12. 

January 28th, 20 Seventh Street owned by C. McTntee and 
occupied by C. Cornell, loss $2,224.75. 



<s 



February 5th, 169 Merrimack Street owned by II. S. Hunne- 
well Estate and occupied by Green Bros, and others, loss $33,735. 

February 9th, 16 Webster Avenue owned by Moses N. Stanley 
and occupied by B. Welch, loss $1,213. 

March 7th, Jackson Street owned by Bay State Storage Com- 
pany and occupied by F. M. Bill Company, loss $20,034.43. 

March 18th, Western Avenue owned by George L. Cady & / 
Sons and occupied by George L. Cady & Sons and others, loss f . 
$.39,047.58. 

.March 19th, Dummer Street owned and occupied by the City 
as Vocational School, loss $2,403.16. 

April 16th, 21 Fenwick Street owned and occupied by George 
Poulakos, loss $1,377.60. 

MaA' 9th, Tanner Street owned and occupied by D. Ziskind, ^s 
loss $1,626. 

May 16th, 43 Elm Street owned by J. Flynn Estate and oc- 
cupied by Winifred Clark, loss $1,126.01. 

June 26th, 243 Mammoth Road owned and occupied by E. 
Morrison, loss $1,489. 

July 3rd, 701 Merrimack St. owned by Michael Quealey, 
vacant loss $3,000. 

August 19th, Bolt St. owned by A. Y. Rodger, occupied by 
Pentucket Fabric Mills and M. S. Ash, loss $8,785,54. 

August 22nd, Newhall St. owned and occupied by W. Coburn 
Company, loss $2,588.43. 

September 15th, 3 Concord Place, owned by T. H. Elliott and 
occupied by several, loss $2,895. 

October 2nd, 645 Varnum Avenue owned and occupied by T. ^ 
Katherine, loss $2,250. 

November 14th, 16 Irving St. owned by M. M. Quealey and oc- 
cupied by A. Hammer, loss $1,101. 

November 26th, 1017 Gorham St. automobile owned by Lajoie 
Coal Company, loss $2,100. 

December 31st, 500-502 Merrimack St. owned by D. J. Hart 
and occupied by D. J. Hart Company, loss $1,628.85. 

The total loss on these twenty-one (21) fires was one hundred 
seventy-four thousand, nine hundred forty-three dollars and 
ninety-seven cents ($174,943.97), leaving twenty thousand, five 
hundred eighty-five dollars and ninety-five cents ($20,585.95) to 
be divided between the other eight hundred and sixty-seven 
alarms. 

A comparison of the total number of alarms and losses from 
January, 1903, to January, 1919: 
Year Alarms Ins. Loss Unins. Loss Total Loss 

1903 446 $223,585.02 $ 6,653.86 $230,238.68 

1904 707 326,861.57 90,464.27 417,325.84 



1905 


798 


89,112.18 


1,850.00 


90,962.18 


1906 


00/ 


64,994.94 


2,270.71 


67,265.65 


1907 


838 


242,167.98 


39,624.52 


281,792.50 


1908 


935 


350,873.25 


16,421.80 


367,295.05 


1909 


963 


177,759.11 


8,705.80 


186,464.91 


1910 


904 


64,781.93 


3,188.00 


67,969.93 


1911 


1101 


86,034.34 


19,295.48 


105,329.82 


1912 


959 


260,833.26 


9,575.99 


270,409.25 


1918 


882 


200,600.03 


19,825.26 


220,425.29 


1914 


1028 


265,804.53 


17,476.53 


283,281.06 


1915 


926 


170,262.53 


12,127.67 


182,390.20 


1916 


896 


138,170.66 


3,400.86 


141,571.52 


1917 


1031 


129,207.10 


14,994.73 


144.201.83 


1918 


1047 


161,940.71 


37,688.51 


199,629.22 



TOTAL NUMBER OF BUILDINGS IN THE CITY 

Wooden building's 19,312 

Brick buildings 1,070 

Cement buildings 176 

Stone buildings 82 

Wood and glass buildings 45 

Wood buildings covered with metal 13 

Steel buildings 12 

Iron buildings 10 

Concrete buildings 3 



Buildings of all descriptions 20,723 

An increase during the past year of 118 

NUMBER OF ALARMS OF FIRE EACH MONTH 

January . 76 July 50 

February 65 August 44 

March 107 September 47 

April 145 October 66 

May 85 November 65 

June 75 December 63 



Total 1,047 

CAUSE OF FIRES AND ALARMS 

Reported 159 Broken sprinkler head. . . 2 

Alarms for same fire. ... 16 Brush 11 

Automobiles 34 ( Carelessness 17 

Boiler smoking 1 Careless use of matches. . 14 

Bon fire 1 ( Caught from oven 3 

Broke through bridge.... 1 Cemenl exploded 1 

10 




( 'hildren and matches. . . 

Chimney 

Cigaret 

Cigar lighter 

Clothes caught fire 

Combustion 

Defective smoke pipe 

Dump 

Electric ear 

Electric fuse 

Electric wires 

Exposure 

False alarms 

Fat on stove 

Fire plaee 

Fire works 

Food burning 

Fumigating' 

Gas jet 

Gas stove 

Grass 

Hot ashes 

Hot iron 

Investigated 

Kerosene stove 

Lamp exploded 

Lamp set woodwork 

Lamp upset 

Lantern set woodwork. . . 

Lightning :.-... 

Meat on stove 

Melting wax 

Motorcycle 

Moulder's flash 

No school 

No school signal for Lib- 
erty Bond 

Oil heater 

Out of the city, 

Overheated boiler 



63 
24 

1 



9 



139 

7 

1 

9 

13 

16 

3 

1 

4 

2 

1 

5 

8 

158 

26 

3 

1 

4 

1 
2 

2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
16 

1 

3 

10 

.13 



( )verheated dvy room .... 1 

( Overheated funnel 1 

Overheated smoke house. . 1 

Overheated stove 7 

Plumber's torch 1 

I^ol ice 1 

Rats and matches 7 

Rekindled 21 

Reported Alarms 159 

Rubbish 28 

Second alarm 4 

Set by boys 9 

Slacked lime 1 

Soot in stove 1 

Sparks from chimney. . . 2 

Sparks from fire 3 

Sparks from forge 3 

Sparks from furnace .... 3 

Sparks from locomotive . 1 

Sparks from stove 2 

Sparks in chute 1 

Sparks in picker machine 3 

Sparks in steel case .... 1 

Sparks set hay 1 

Sparks set roof 5 

Sparks set sleeper 1 

Smoking 21 

Steam escaping 4 

Steam pipe . . . 1 

Stove funnel set roof ... 1 

Stove set partition 2 

Stove smoking 15 

Thawing water pipes ... 29 
Thermostat system out of 

order 13 

Third alarm 4 

Unknown 1 

Water front exploded ... 3 

Water pipe burst 2 



NUMBER OF ALARMS ANSWERED BY MEMBERS OF 

THE DEPARTMENT ON DAYS OFF 

Capt. C. E. Abare 2 Capt. G. A. Campbell ... 1 

Capt. E. W. Bartletl 4 Capt. T. W. Collins 2 

Capti J. E. Burns 1 Capt. T. F. Conway 1 

11 






Capt. T. Dwyer 3 C. 

Capt. W. II. Halstead ... 2 J. 

Capt. C. F. Hemenway . . 2 J. 

Capt. J. J. McCafferty . . 1 J. 

Capt. H. A. Merrill 3 W 

Capt. J. A. Shea 1 J. 

Lieut. J. W. Adams 2 J. 

Lieut. F. B. Akers 4 J. 

Lieut. W. M. Barrett 1 W 

Lieut. J. M. G. Burns ... 1 H. 

Lieut. F. G. Collins 1 J. 

Lieut. E. P. Cunningham. 1 W 

Lieut. H. L. Foster 2 W 

Lieut. J. W. Halstead ... 1 J. 

Lieut. H. F. Harris 2 W 

Lieut. W. S. Holt 1 T. 

Lieut. J. W. Jantzen 4 J. 

Lieut. E. Jennings 1 II. 

Lieut. G. II. McDermott . 1 J. 

Lieut. J. J. Rinehardt ... 1 W 

Lieut. C. F. Stackpole ... 1 R. 

Lieut. W. F. Tighe 1 B. 

F. E. Alcott 1 J. 

W. H. Bamford 5 B. 

E. S. Barnes 2 F. 

R, W. Broadbent 2 G. 

C. L. Brown 1 F. 

R. Carland 1 J. 



H. Cogswell ! . . . 1 

F. Convery 2 

L. Crowe 1 

J. Donahoe 2 

F. Egan 1 

N. Emerson 1 

D. Finnegan 4 

A. Fletcher 1 

T. Foss 2 

S. Gardner 2 

H. Gray 2 

J. Heelon 1 

J. Lane 2 

J. Lowney 1 

. 0. Lussier 1 

F. Maguire 1 

J. Malone 3 

R. Morrison 1 

O'Hare 2 

, H. Oke 2 

Otley 2 

C. Reed 1 

H. Rogers 3 

M. Simpson 2 

0. J. Townsend 1 

A. Schofield 1 

J. Sullivan 1 

J. Wholey 1 



12 



*- T3 
U ^ 
> CO 

O 3 
U 



00 

55 



U. 

z 
111 

< 

Q. 
UJ 

Q 

UJ 

I 
H 

U. 


ui 

o 
> 

111 
(/) 



eo -q 

.aJB 

4> > 



1^ 









° £ <U 

"- -a .2 

f-r. « 



O O lO "* v© to 

\D 'O O rt ro v© 



On 



O •(■ O^ N fO O 
vO h f) \0 N Q\ 

rH >~i ro r* 



-t- 



W (S u 
t* (j ee 
<U -~ 3 

-2 6 eo 
6 «•* 

Z ~ 






00 



ro 



iO 









^3-0 




•afl l) 


u 


c 2 


Z 


.3 3 

4-1 




►4 




<u 


"o 


CO 

"3 1> 




C co 




C3 3 


3 



T3 C 



■hj CO ••" 

u o ^ 



u £ £ 

-° o £ 

3 * 

z 



ECU 
T3 



6- « 
Z 



t>» l-« ro vO r-» </} -<*■ ro v© (N l^ fS 



00 



■«v 



~X -X J\ -\ ^ 

■*r0tu)0l»r0f000^f01- 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 
OO^OOLOOOOOOOO 
-rr\OiO<©uovOrnrO<S^f*)vO 

O^OOOrOONO^HNON 
r-i HMH t-< »H »H *H 



Tj-t>i©"i-»HTt-©r<)rOa0O>i'"..v©ClC<t>r^ 

_i«-l--iHiHr-liH»-»rH i-H rHrH fv| 



i— ifMCO^LO s «Ot^c300NO'— ' CN '-' CM CO ^t 



c 

'-So 

c 






O 

X 



*© 



O 

1^ 



o 
o 
1> 

00 



N. »H rH On 



v© 

>o 

M 



Qu 



IN MEMORIAM 



WILLIAM H. HALSTEAD 
CAPTAIN 

Protective Company 

Appointed May, 1864 

DIED 

February 6, 1918 



CHARLES J. MEEHAN 

LADDERMAN 

Truck Company No. 1 

Appointed August, 1914 

DIED 

May 13, 1918 



PATRICK EMERSON 
CALLMAN 

Hose Company No. 7 
Appointed February, 1883 
DIED 
December 19, 1918 



IN MEMORIAM 



MARTIN C. ROWELL 

PENSIONER 

Appointed April, 1894 

Pensioned September 28, 1918 

DIED 

October 11, 1918 



DAVID J. HURLEY 

CAPTAIN 

PENSIONER 

Appointed May, 1879 

Pensioned February 13, 1917 

DIED 

October 29, 1918 



AMHERST S. MAYNARD 
PENSIONER 

Appointed November, 1884 
Pensioned July 27, 1918 
DIED 
December 2, 1918 



IN MB MORI AM 



WILLISTON L. PEABODY 
PENSIONER 
Appointed November, 1874 
Pensioned 1908 . 
DIED 
December 5, 1918 



FRANK SIMONS 

PENSIONER 

Appointed September, 1872 

Pensioned July 27, 1913 

DIED 

December 14, 1918 



FATALITIES. 

March 18. William K. Aldrich, age seventy-three years. 
Burned to death at G. L. Cady fire, Western Avenue. 

June 14. Ovala Bashard, 160 Merrimack Street, age fifty-one 
years. Clothing caught from gas stove. 

June 17. Evangelina Courankos, 591 Market Street, age eight 
years. Match set clothing. 

August 1. Bstella Etouselle, 5 West Tenth Street, age four 
years. Matches set clothing. 

August 27. Annette Bouchard, 151 Salem Street, age two 
years. Clothing caught from gas stove. 

September 2. Mabel Bratchell, 22 Essex Street, age five years. 
Burning grass set clothing. 

September 15. Mary OTIare, 3 Concord Place, age forty-nine 
years. Suffocated. 

December 3. Mrs. Lena Paton, 1 Dalton Place, age seventy- 
three years. Lighting fire with kerosene. 

In conclusion I wish to extend my thanks to His Honor, the 
Mayor, the Commissioner of Water Works and Fire Protection 
and the Municipal Council for the interest taken in matters per- 
taining to the Fire Department-. I also wish to thank the officers 
and members of the Department for the ability, faithfulness and 
willingness shown in the performance of their duties. I wish to 
extend thanks to the Chief of Police and the members of the 
Police Department for the assistance rendered at fires. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD F. SAUNDERS, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



17 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

January 1, 1919. 

Commissioner. 
GEORGE H. BROWN Office, City Hall 

Residence, 445 Middlesex Street 



Chief Engineer 
EDWARD F. SAUNDERS Office, Palmer St. Engine House 

Residence, 24 Mt. Washington St. 



District Chiefs. 
JAMES C. SULLIVAN 
DANIEL R. CROWLEY 
THOMAS F. SAUNDERS 



250 Rogers St. 

26 Marginal St. 

168 School St. 



Assistant Engineer. 
CHARLES E. ALWAY 16 West Bowers St. 



HARRY B. SANDERS 



Chief's Chauffeur. 



20 Manahan St. 



Fire Alarm Operator. 
HENRY C. FERNALD Palmer St. Engine House 

THOMAS McCORMICK, Lineman 37 West Fifth St. 

ARTHUR E. KING, Lineman 205 Stackpole St. 

ROBERT G. RUTHERFORD, Lineman 34 Ware St. 



Telephone Operators. 
THOMAS F. CONWAY, Chief Operator 

jeremiah j. harrington 
philip Mclaughlin 
george w. lovett 



148 Sixth St. 

243 Stackpole St. 

16 Keene St. 

17 Olive St. 



Fire Prevention Inspector. 
EDWARD P. CUNNINGHAM 109 Mammoth Road 



18 



LIST OF MEMBERS, GIVING RANK AND RESIDENCE 

BY COMPANIES. 

ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
795 Gorham Street. 



Thomas W. Collins, Captain, Badge No. 11 
Philip F. Mooney, Lieutenant, Badge No. 18 
James W. Jantzen, Engineer, Badge No. 16 
Robert II. Otley, Hoseman, Badge No. 12 
James O'Hare, Hoseman, Badge No. 13 
W. Henry Kirkpatrick, Hoseman, Badge No. 
Wm. J. Heelon, Driver, Badge No. 14 12 rear 
James H. Gray. Driver, Badge No. 85 
Thomas McNamara, Call Man, Badge No. 17 



145 Andrews St. 

203 Moore St. 

3 Olive St. 

Engine House 

27 Ellsworth St. 

10 35 London St. 

33 So. Whipple St. 

23 Ellsworth St. 

Engine House 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

45 Branch Street. 

Henry Boynton, Captain, Badge No. 2 17 Lane St. 

Orison A. Knapp, Captain, Badge No. 23 47 Hawthorn St. 

Franklin B. Akers, Lieutenant, Badge No. 21 25 Waugh St. 

Charles F. Staekpole, Lieutenant, Badge No. 22 25 Grace St. 

Herman R. Morrison, Engineer, Badge No. 29 342 Westford St. 

Wilbur H. Oke, Hoseman, Badge No. 20 175 Westford St. 

George A. Crawford, Hoseman, Badge No. 25 47 Highland Ave. 

William P. Maker, Driver, Badge No. 26 12 Flemings St. 

James H. Lannon, Hoseman, Badge No. 27 819 Lawrence St. 

Peter J. Regan, Hoseman 316 Rogers St. 

Andrew B. McLaughlin, Hoseman 76 Willie St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

Palmer Cor. Middle Street. 

Frank Hoyt, Captain, Badge No. 30 
Elbridge H. Dearth, Captain, Badge No. 31 
Harold L. Foster, Lieutenant, Badge No. 36 
John J. Rinehardt, Lieutenant, Badge No. 39 
Moses I. Collins, Hoseman, Badge No. 33 
Frank E. Turner, Hoseman, Badge No. 3 
Hugh V. Green, Hoseman, Badge No. 35 



21 Eighth Ave. 

64 So. Loring St. 

31 Midland St. 

101 Gates St. 

20 Coral St. 

15 Ware St. 

549 Lakeview Ave. 



Bartholomew J. Mullen, Hoseman, Badge No. 37 2 Clinton Ave. 
William E. Gorman, Hoseman, Badge No. 34 17 Ellis Ct. 



19 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

High' Street, 



J. Edward Burns, Captain, Badge No. 4 3 
Alfred F. Prescott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 42 
Joseph M. G. Burns, Lieutenant, Badge No. 47 
Charles L. Brown, Engineer, Badge No. 134 
William F. Dolan, Hoseman, Badge No. 43 
Patrick J. Mooney, Hoseman, Badge No. 45 
James T. Doyle, Hoseman, Badge No. 49 
Francis J. Sullivan, Hoseman, Badge No. 44 
George J. Tracy,- Hoseman, Badge No. 41 
Michael E. Egan, Hoseman, Badge No. 48 



9 Whitehead Ave. 

565 Wilder St. 

543 Rogers St. 

Engine House 

Engine House 
158 Pleasant St. 

Engine House 

151 Lawrence St. 

30 Riverside St. 

113 Pleasant St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 



29 Fourth Street. 

James J. MeCafferty, Captain, Badge No. 55 
Patrick F. Mahoney, Lieutenant, Badge No. 56 
Alonzo E. Kidder, Driver, Badge No. 5 

Jay D. Ismond, Engineer, Badge No. 51 

Bird C. Reed, Driver, Badge No. 54 

Edson S. Barnes, Hoseman, Badge No. 50 

0. Herbert Cogswell, Hoseman, Badge No. 52 



74 Fourth St. 

18 Fourth St. 

61 Twelfth St. 

246 Beacon St. 

48 Humphrey St. 

68 Beacon St. 

85 Whitnev Ave. 



Joseph E. Fontaine, Hoseman, Badge No. 109 259 W. Sixth St 
James C. O'Neil, Asst. Engineer, Badge No. 57 20 Sixth Ave 
Thomas F. Sullivan,. Hoseman, Badge No. 73 
David Common, Call Man, Badge No. 53 
Frederick D. Mansnr, Call Man, Badge No. 58 
Arthur B. Strout, Call Man, Badge No. 59 



38 Fremont St. 

109 Beech St. 

21 Third St. 

101 Mvrtle St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO 

Fletcher Street. 

Richard E. Burns, Captain, Badge No. 68 
John J. Murphy, Lieutenant, Badge No. 64 
Wm. -I. Lambert, Lieutenant, Badge No. 65 
John A. Fletcher, Hoseman, Badge No. 6 
Frank G. Collins, Engineer, Badge No. 62 
Thomas F. Maguire, Hoseman, Badge No. 63 
Samuel R. Pendexter, Hoseman, Badge No. 
Edgar Perham, Hoseman, Badge No. 69 
Jolin -J. Wholev, Hoseman, Badge No. 66 



6. 



203 Westford St. 

239 School St. 

963 Middlesex St. 

37 Yarney St. 

798 Moody St. 

14 Yarney St. 

6C22 AY. Bowers St. 

55 Arlington St. 

48 Mt. Yernon St. 



20 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 7. 

490 Centra] Street. 

James A. Shea, Captain, Badge No. 70 22 Bleachery St. 

Thomas II. Welch, Lieutenant, Badge No. 72 93 Chapel St. 

Timothy 3. Dewire, Driver, Badge No. 7 315 High St. 

-lames II. Tracy, Hoseman, Badge No. 76 147 Concord St. 

William 3. Lane, Hoseman, Badge No. 74 505 Central St. 

Peter B. Gray, Hoseman, Badge No. 75 71 Whipple St. 

HOSE COMPANY NO. S. 
Merrimack, Corner Race Street. 
George P. Flint, Captain, Badge No. 82 63 Woodward Ave. 

George II. McDermott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 38 171 Cross St. 
Joseph F. Convery, Hoseman, Badge No. 83 19 Bowers St. 

Joseph IT. Rogers, Hoseman, Badge No. 81) 209 Ludlam St, 

Henry 0. Carpentier, Hoseman, Badge No. 84 30 W. Meadow Rd. 
Joseph L. Crowe, Hoseman, Badge No. 87 116 Crawford St. 

•John J. McCarthy, Hoseman, Badge No. 88 150 Fourth Ave 

HOSE COMPANY NO. 9. 
Lincoln Street. 
Gilman S. Aleott, Captain, Badge No. 90 1194 Middlesex St. 
George IT. Chapman, Lieutenant, Badge No. 92 53 Quebec St. 
Charles A. Rock, Driver, Badge No. 93 673 Chelmsford St. 

Fred Boynton, Hoseman, Badge No. 98 148 Smith St. 

Fred O. J. Townsend, Hoseman, Badge No. 96 14 Somerset St. 
Frank A. Kappler, Call Man, Badge No. 94 125 London St. 

HOSE COMPANY NO. 10. 

Mammoth Road. 

Edwin W. Bartlett, Captain, Badge No. 160 559 Fletcher St. 
William F. Tighe, Lieutenant, Badge No. 162 28 Willie St. 

Robert W. Broadbent, Driver, Badge No. 161 11 Fourth Ave. 
Roger 3. Hayes, Hoseman, Badge No. 164 242 Mammoth Rd. 
David Laferriere, Hoseman, Badge No. 167 100 W. Meadow Rd. 
Edwai'd F. Farrell, Hoseman, Badge No. 166 12 Third Ave. 

John 3. Frazier, ('all Man, Badge No. 163 54 Starbird St. 

Thomas F. Welch, Call Man, Badge No. 165 30 Riverside St. 

21 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 11 
Lawrence, Corner South Whipple 
William A. Dolan, Captain, Badge No. 200 
Edward Jennings, Lieutenant, Badge No. 201 
John D. Finnegan, Driver, Badge No. 203 
John N. Emerson, Hoseman, Badge No. 202 
Michael J. O'Connor, Hoseman, Badge No. 204 
John J. Donohoe, Hoseman, Badge No. 207 
Peter Sheehan, Call Man, Badge No. 19 
James E. Burns, Call Man, Badge No. 205 
Frederick H. Crosby, Call Man, Badge No. 206 



Street. 

56 Crowley St. 

859 Lawrence St. 

732 Lawrence St. 

27 Carter St. 

101 London St. 

76 Agawam St. 

11 Lvon St. 

93 Moore St. 

14 Whidden St. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 12. 



West Sixth Street. 
Charles E. Abare, Captain, Badge No. 220 
Wm. M. Barrett, Lieutenant, Badge No. 221 
Lewis P. Reed, Lieutenant, Badge No. 224 
Joseph Bernier, Hoseman, Badge No. 223 
Edward Landry, Hoseman, Badge No. 226 



51 Fifth St. 

16 W. Bowers St. 

874 Lakeview Ave. 

27 Beaulieu St. 

29 Beaulieu St. 



William F. Egan, Hoseman, Badge No. 225 69 Lilley Ave. 



TRUCK COMPANY NO. 

Lawrence Street. 



1. 



27 



Timothy Brown, Captain, Badge No. 209 
Timothy Dwyer, Captain, Badge No. 210 
John J. Lowney, Driver, Badge No. 215 
Jas. F. McGuinness, Ladderman, Badge No. 213 
Patrick H. O'Laughlin, Ladderman, Badge No. 
Roy N. Symonds, Ladderman, Badge No. 214 5 
Edward J. Tighe, Ladderman, 



So. Whipple St. 
23 Sidney St. 

361 Lincoln St. 

119 Agawam St. 

216 30 Mead St. 

19 Broadwav St. 

72 Chestnut St. 



TRUCK COMPANY NO. 2. 
Westford Street. 
Daniel W. Hilliard, Captain, Badge No. 121 
George W. Alcott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 120 
Willis S. Holt, Lieutenant, 
George A. Dickey, Driver, Badge No. 127 
Edgar E. Smith, Ladderman, Badge No. 123 
Hamblin S. Gardner, Ladderman, Badge No. 122 8 Hastings St. 
Herbert W. Hilliard, Ladderman, Badge No. 124 20 Osgood St. 
Quincy A. Foster, Ladderman, Badge No. 126 39 Midland St. 
Forest E. Alcott, Ladderman, Badge No. 28 11 Dover St. 

H. A. McLaughlin, Ladderman, Badge No. 212 127 Bellevue St. 
Frank E. Harris, Call Man, Badge No. 129 Truck House 



20 Osgood St. 

62 Grove St. 

8 Hale St. 

11 Hastings St. 

206 Wilder St. 



22 



TRUCK COMPANY NO. 3. 

Palmer Street. 

Herbert A. Merrill, Captain, Badge No. 110, 4 Wachusett St. 

Thomas F. Conway, Captain, Badge No. 117 148 Sixth St. 

Philip J. Connor, Driver, Badge No. 112 506 Gorliam St. 

William T. Foss, Ladderman, Badge No. 140 37 Pond St. 

Robert Carland, Ladderman, Badge No. Ill 17 Second St. 
John J. McManmon, Ldman, Badge No. 114 23 Woodward Ave. 

John P. Moore, Ladderman, Badge No. 116 1017 Central St. 

Patrick J. Finnerty, Ldman, Badge No. 119, 113 Lawrence St. 

Martin F. McNally, Ldman, Badge No. 115, 57 So. Whipple St. 

James A. Haley, Ladderman, Badge No. 113 23 Bowers St. 

TRUCK COMPANY NO. 4. 

West Sixth Street. 
Joseph D 'Amour, Captain, Badge No. 100 24 Fisher St. 

John J. Flynn, Lieutenant, Badge No. 103 18 Ross Ave. 

George E. Schofield, Driver, Badge No. 108 95 Myrtle St. 

William O. Lussier, Ladderman, Badge No. 102 9 Bowers St. 
Edward A. Walsh, Ladderman, Badge No. 106 19 Mt. Vernon St. 
George J. Hurley, Ladderman, Badge No. 107, 192 Fletcher St. 
Nathaniel Landry, Call Man, Badge No. 105 29 Carolyn St. 

William N. Flagg, Call Man, Badge No. 79 75 Whitney Ave. 

PROTECTIVE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Warren Street. 

George A. Campbell, Captain, Badge No. 135 11 Third Ave. 
James W. Halstead, Lieutenant, Badge No. 136 115 Warwick St. 
Edw. J. P. Cunningham, Lt, Badge No. 154 109 Mammoth Rd. 
John F. Ambrose, Lieutenant, Badge No. 131 212 Princeton St. 
Joseph J. Malone, Patrolman, Badge No. 133 427 Lincoln St. 
Berry M. Simpson, Patrolman, Badge No. 132 5 Third St. 

William H. Bamford, Patrolman, Badge No. 151 53 Main St. 
William F. Christie, Patrolman, Badge No. 130 114 Lincoln St. 
Frank A. Corcoran, Patrolman, Badge No. 134 556 Central St. 



23 



FTRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



LOCATION— Palmer Street Engine House. 
Henry C. Fernald, Operator. 
Thomas McCormick, Lineman. 
Arthur E. King, Lineman. 
Robert G. Rutherford, Lineman. 

Ten-circuit Automatic Repeater with Storage Battery of 600 

cups 

Miles of Wire 113 

Signal Boxes 168 

Engineers ' Gongs 8 

Engine House Gongs 17 

Indicators . , 18 

Tape Register 1 

Bell Strikers 12 



Gong and Indicator at Police Station. 

Gong in Pumping Station. 

Gong on Merrimack Square. 

Gong on Tower's Corner. 

Gong on Northern Depot. 

Gong corner Moody and Aiken Streets. 

Gong corner Bridge and First Streets. 

Gong corner Andover and Fayette Streets. 



The strikers are located as follows: Palmer Street Engine 
House, Varnum School House, High Street Church, Court House, 
No. 1 Engine House, No. 6 Engine House, Highland School 
House, Pawtucketville Engine House, Franklin School House, 
Lawrence Street Engine House, Cornell Street School House, 
West Sixth Street Engine House. 



24 



SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Lowell City Library 



TWENTY-NINTH REPORT 



OF THE 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



OF THE CITY OF LOWELL- 
MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE YEAR NINETEEN HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 




LOWELL, MASS. 
kilburn Printing Company Old Grist mill. 

1913 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE LIBRARY 1918 



Board of Trustees 

Hon. Perry D. Thompson, Mayor, Ex-officio 



Henry H. Harris 


Term 


expires 1923 


John T. Donehue, D. D. S. 


«< 


1919 


Edward J. Welch, M. D. 


« 


1920 


Hugh J. Molloy 


(< 


192 1 


Alexis E. Bertram, M. D. . 


(< 


1922 


Organization 





Hon. Perry D. Thompson, Chairman 
John T. Donehue,. Vice-Chairman 
Frederick A. Chase, Clerk. 



Librarian 
Frederick A. Chase 



Asst. Librarian 

Alice M. Myers 



Assistants 



Harriet M. Sullivan Annette Lemaitre 

Dorothy P. Webster Blanche Gray 

Alice L. Donehue 



Walter H. Gilman 



Bindery 



Leo Mongrain 



Harry C. Bowen 



Superintendent of Reading Room 

Stephen T. Wyman 



Librarian of Children's Room 
Bertha G. Kyle 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT OF 1918 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR 1918 



To the Honorable, the Municipal Council of Lowell: 

Gentlemen : — The Trustees of the City Library herewith 
present their annual report for the year 1918. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts 

Appropriation by Municipal Council. .. .$17,617.82 

Fines, etc 387.28 

Transfers from John Davis Fund 3,440.35 

$21,445.45 

Expenditures 

Salaries $13,391.21 

Lighting 575.12 

Binding 1,160.44 

Periodicals 904.16 

Books v 306.85 

Sundries— Printing . ." $390.00 

Water Tax 22.50 

Express, etc 69.75 

Supplies 375.44 

Postage 75.35 

Repairs 1.00 

Miscellaneous 429.23 

$1,363.27 

Delivery Stations $304.05 

Expenses of Children's Room, 
Sunday opening and Books, 
etc., charged to David Fund 3,440.35 

$21,445.45 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 



The circulation of books for the year shows a falling off in the 
use of the library, 126,074 for 1918 against 162,813 for 1917 a 
decrease of 36,739. The falling off was due chiefly to the fact 
that the library was open only 261 days in 1918 and 301 days in 
1917. During repairs to the heating plant and until new boil- 
ers were established it was neccessary to close the library for 
about seven weeks. 



CHANGES IN THE LIBRARY STAFF 



The resignation in July of Miss Alice H. Rinder to become 
Mrs. John L. Douglas was distinct loss to the Library Staff 
She had been connected with the library since May 1902 and 
was much beloved by her associates and had many friends 
among the patrons of the library. Her death Dec. 27 barely 
six months after leaving the library and subsequent marriage 
was a great shock to all who knew her. 



PORTRAIT OF FREDERICK W, STICKNEY 



The library's collection of paintings received a valuable addition 
in the gift by Frederick W. Stickney of an oil portrait of him- 
self by Krnest Ipsen. As Mr. Stickney was the architect of 
Memorial Building the appropriateness of placing it in the 
library is evident. 



a 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



JOHN DAVIS FUND 



Income for 1918 



Cash on hand at last report $ 919.52 

Interest and dividend earnings on in- 
vestments and loans 3,067.47 

Payment on account of mortgage note.. 150.00 

Rebate on Taxes 82.71 



Expenditures 



Expenses of Children's Room $ 854.17 

Expenses of Sunday opening 268.64 

Books purchased for the Library 2,218.54 

Pictures 99.00 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1919 779.35 



$4,219.71 



$4,219.71 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



JOHN DAVIS FUND 
LIST OF SECURITIES 

Registered Bonds 



Name Due 

City of Boston 1919 

Boston & Maine R. R 1944 

Boston & Maine R. R 1926 

Boston & Maine R. R 1929 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 1954 

Illinois Central R. R 1952 

Boston & Albany R. R 1952 

Atch., Top. Cl Santa Fe 1995 

Hartford, Conn 1923 

City of Fall River 1926 

City of Baltimore 1958 

City of Waterbury, Conn 1950 



Railroad Stock 

No. Price per 

Shares Name of Road Share Amoum 

41 Boston & Maine (Common) 30 $1,230.00 

39 Boston & Albany 142 5.538.00 

1 Nashua & Lowell 139 13900 

1 Concord & Montreal (4th Class) 73 7300 



Rate of 


Par 


Interest 


Value 


3%% 


$10,000.00 


4 x /2% 


11,000.00 


4 % 


10,000.00 


4 V2% 


5,000.00 


4 % 


10.000.00 


3V 2 % 


10,000.00 


3V2% 


4,000.00 


4 % 


1,000.00 


4V2% 


10,000.00 


4 % 


4,000.00 


4 % 


5,000.00 


4%% 


4,000.00 




$84,000.00 



Manufacturing Stocks 



$6,980.00 



Shares Name of Company Share Amount 
No. Price per 

6 Lowell Bleachery 135 $810.00 

Miscellaneous Stock 

12 American Tel. & Tel. Co 104% $1,255.50 

3 Lowell Gas Light Co 170 510.00 

$1,765-50 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



Bank Stocks 

No. Price per 

Shares Bank Share Amount 

9 Appleton Nat. Bank, Lowell no $990.00 

3 Old Lowell Nat. Bank, Lowell 100 300.00 

2 Wamesit Nat. Bank, Lowell 100 200.00 

n Union Nat. Bank, Lowell 175 1,925.00 

10 First Nat. Bank of West Newton 170 1,70000 



$5,115.00 



Savings Bank Book 

Bank Book No. Amount 

Central Savings Bank 35073 $202.96 

Mortgage Notes 

A. H ! C2,ooo.oo 

J. L. L 400.00 



$2,400.00 



Summary of Investments and Cash Assets 

Name of Investment Val. Mar. 20, '18 Val. Mar. 29, 19 Increase Decrease^ 

Registered Bonds $84,000.00 $84,000.00 

Railroad Stocks 6,028.00 6,980.00 $952.00 

Manufacturing Stocks . . . 798.00 810.00 12.00 

Miscellaneous Stocks .... 1,729.50 1,765.50 36.00 

Bank Stocks 5,203.00 5,115.00 $88.00 

Savings Bank Book 19415 202.96 8.81 

Mortgage Notes 2,550.00 2,400.00 150.00 

Cash in Bank 919-52 679.35 140.67 



$101,422.17 $101,952.81 $613.02 Net In. 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



EXHIBITIONS 



French Pastellists, Panama Exposition, War, Rhodesia, 
Glacier, Fragments from France, Masters of Color, Year 1492, 
St. Gaudens, Advertising Posters, Mother Goose, Verona II, 
Antarctic. 

CONDITION OF THE LIBRARY 



New volumes purchased during the year 1,918 

Volumes added by gift 

Volumes added by binding periodicals 54 

Worn-out books replaced 10 

Duplicates purchased 500 

Total number of volumes added , 1,840 

Total number of volumes in the Library 102,647 

Periodicals and papers subscribed for 

Periodicals and papers given 

Number of volumes used, home and reference 121,503 

Number of volumes consulted in the Reference Room 5,037 

Magazines circulated 4,571 

Library opened, days 261 

Total circulation 126,074 

Average daily circulation 483 

Largest monthly circulation (March) 15,774 

Smallest monthly circulation (Sept.) 9,339 

Largest daily circulation (Feb. 23) 739 

Smallest daily circulation (Aug. 14) 108 

Percentage of fiction read 73.1 

Percentage of other classes 26.9 

Children's Room circulation 22,149 

Daily average 86 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 1 REPORT 1918 



LIST OF DONORS, 1918 



VoL Pamphlets 

Balch, E. S. and E. M, . . , 1 

Balch, T. Willing 1 

Berry, Albert L 1 

Bible Training School, So. Lancaster . . 3 

Boudinot, Wm. D 2 

Brookshire, E. V 1 

Carbonnel, Emile 1 

Cudworth, W. H 1 

Farnsworth, E. C 1 

Guaranty Trust Co., N. Y 1 

Henry, Francis A .1 

Kahn, Otto H. , 1 1 

Kirkland, H. S 1 

Klein, N. H 2 

Locks and Canals Co., Lowell 123 

Lowell Temperance Union 1 

Megata Baron Tanetari 1 

Michigan Sac. S. A. R 1 

Payne, G. H 1 

Penrose, R. A. F., Jr 1 

Perlman, L 1 

Quevli, Nels 1 

Rockefeller, J. D., Jr 1 

Russell, C. P. and L. A 1 

Serbian Relief Committee 1 



10 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



Southe n Pine Assoc 2 

Southworth, W. S 26 

*Van Norden, W. M 1 

State Library, Trenton, N. J 1 

White, Capt. W. P 2 

Wright, A. A 1 



183 




LIBRARY TRUSTEES 1 REPORT 1918 11 



STATISTICS IN FORM ADOPTED BY THE AMERICAN 



LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



City Library, Lowell, Mass. 

Annual Report for Year Ending December 31, 1918. 

Population, 1915 Census, 107,978. Estimate, 1918, 130,000. 

Free for Lending and Reference. 

Two delivery stations, namely one at Davis Square, one in 
Centralyille and several deposit stations. 

Main Library open 261 days during year. 66 hours a week 
for lending. 72 hours for reading. 

Library open Sundays (Oct. to June) for reference and read- 
ing 2 to 9 P. M. 

Reading Room open Sundays, g A. M. to 9 P. M. 

Volumes in Library, January 1, 1918 100,807 

Added by purchase 1,765 

Added by gift 75 

Volumes in Library, Dec. 31, 1918 102,647 

Volumes of fiction lent for home use : 

Adult, 73,136; Juvenile, 15,699. Total 88,835 

Total volumes lent for home use : 

Adult, 94,317; Juvenile, 22,149. Total 116,466 

1592 Borrowers registered during year. Registration period 
three years. 

230 Newspapers and Periodicals currently received. 



12 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES' REPORT 1918 



Mew Registration with Three Year Limit, April 1, 1910 



Applicants received during' the year 1,717 

Applicants who did not call for cards 125 

Number of names registered Dec. 31, 1918 27,319 

Number of names registered Dec. 31, 1917 25,727 

Total registered during the year 1,592 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY SOLICITOR 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1918 



LOWELL, MASS. 
BUCKLAND PRINTING COMPANY, 72-74 MIDDLE STREET 



REPORT 



OFFICE OF CITY SOLICITOR 
LOWELL, MASS. 

December 31, 19 18. 

To the Municipal Council of the City of Lowell, 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith respectfully submit the following annual report 
of the law department. i 

During the year 19 18 the following cases have been dis- 
posed of : 

SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT 

658 Frederick A. Fisher et als vs. Fred H. Rourke. 

This was a petition brought by the members of the so-called 
High School Building Commission praying that a writ of man- 
damus might issue against Fred H. Rourke, as city treasurer, 
directing him to pay to the New England Structural Company 
and the Concrete Steel Products Company certain amounts 
named in bills rendered by said Companies to the City of Lowell, 
said bills having been approved by said Commission, and which 
the city treasurer had declined to pay, assigning as his reason 



4 Report of City Solicitor 

therefor, that the city solicitor in an opinion to the Municipal 
Council had stated that said commission was illegally appointed 
and did not exist as a matter of law. A demurrer and an an- 
swer were filed by the city solicitor, and a hearing held before 
Judge Carroll. The demurrer was overruled and the matter 
sent to John A. Brett, Esq., as auditor, to hear the parties and 
their evidence for the purpose of determining the facts in issue. 
Several hearings were held before the auditor, who found at 
their conclusion for the petitioners. Thereafter, exceptions to 
the auditor's finding were presented by the city solicitor and 
argued before Mr. Justice Pierce of the Supreme Judicial Court. 
Judge Pierce found that the High School Building Commission 
was illegally appointed, and dismissed the petition. 

The writ was dated July 6, 191 7 and returnable to the 
Supreme Judicial Court July 17, 1917. 

16225 Frank M. Had ley et als vs. Perry D. Thompson et als. 

This was a petition for a writ of mandamus brought in the 
Supreme Judicial Court by Frank M. Hadley, Daniel Cosgrove, 
Joseph Legare, Cornelius Desmond, and Willis E. Morse, pray- 
ing that said writ might issue against Perry D. Thompson, 
Charles J. Morse, James E. Donnelly, George H. Brown, and 
Francis A. Warnock, members of the Municipal Council of the 
City of Lowell, and Stephen Flynn, City Clerk, and Hugh C. 
McOsker, Omer Allard and Fred Harrison, members of the 
Board of Registrars of Voters of said city, commanding them to 
examine the supplemental petition for the adoption of "Plafi 
B" charter, filed on or about April 1, 1918, and to have same put 
on the ballot at the next annual city election, provided that a 
sufficient number of signatures of duly qualified and registered 
voters on the supplemental petitions, added to the signatures 



Report of City Solicitor 5 

of the duly registered and qualified voters on the original peti- 
tion, appeared to form the number required by law to have said 
petition put on the ballot. There was an agreed statement of 
facts filed, and a hearing was held before Mr. Justice Carroll 
on the facts as agreed. The hearing resolved into a discussion 
wholly of the facts of the case. The court found on the facts 
as agreed that as a matter of law, the petitioners were not en- 
titled to maintain their action, and dismissed the petition. 

The writ was dated July 10, 1918, and returnable to the 
Supreme Judicial Court July 23, 19 18. 

16259 Orison A. Knapp vs. George H. Brown, et al. 
(Law) 

This was a petition praying that a peremptory writ of man- 
damus might issue against George H. Brown, as Commissioner 
of Water Works and Fire Protection, and Edward F. Saun- 
ders, as Chief of the Fire Department, directing them to recog- 
nize the petitioner as the holder of the office of captain in the 
fire department of the City of Lowell, and to treat him as the 
holder of said office in all respects as before his attempted re- 
moval from said office by said Commissioner. The writ was 
dated December 6, 19 18, and returnable to Supreme Judicial 
Court December 13, 1918. The petitioner was reinstated as 
captain in said fire department, and the petition dismissed. 

3237 Andrew G. Stiles vs. James E. O'Donnell et als. 
Edward H. Foye vs. Same. 

These were two petitions for writs of mandamus brought 
in the Supreme Judicial Court by the petitioners against the 
mayor and all other members of the municipal council for the 



6 - Report of City Solicitor 

purpose of reinstating the petitioners in their respective offices 
of city treasurer and purchasing agent of said city. The respon- 
dents filed a plea in abatement, demurrer, and answer in each 
case, and were ordered by the court to elect on whicli they chose 
to be heard. They elected to be heard on their answers and re- 
quested that their rights be saved. The cases were consolidated 
and submitted to Carroll J., upon the petitions and answers and 
certain communications. 

After receiving a notice from the Municipal Council of its 
proposal to remove him, the petitioner Stiles requested a pub- 
lic hearing before said council, which was granted. Thereafter 
he was removed from the office of city treasurer. 

The petitioner Foye also was granted a public hearing, after 
receiving notice of his proposed removal from the office of pur- 
chasing agent, and thereafter was removed from said office. 

In each case Judge Pierce ordered that peremptory writs 
should issue, and at the request of the parties reported the case 
on all questions of law for the determination of the full court. 
The full court confirmed the opinion of the single justice. 

These petitions were dated June 25, 191 7 and returnable 
July 23, 1917. 

SUPERIOR COURT 

30137 Mary A. Cheney vs. City of Lozvell. 

31058 Props, of Locks and Canals on Merrimack River vs. 
Same. 

These were two petitions brought in Superior Court in the 
year 191 7 for a jury to assess damages for land and buildings 
on Mammoth Road, taken by the City of Lowell for the purpose 
of constructing a new bridge over the Merrimack River at Paw- 



Report of City Solicitor 7 

tucket Falls; said land being the property of the Proprietors of 
the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, and said building 
the property of Mary A. Cheney, which building was constructed 
on said land which had been leased "from said Proprietors. 
Settlement without trial in court was effected with the plaintiffs, 
and agreements for judgment in the sums of fifteen hundred dol- 
lars and eight hundred and thirty-six dollars and eighty cents, 
respectively, and costs, were filed in the Superior Court. It 
was agreed that an entry of "Judgment satisfied" might be made 
in both cases. 

The Cheney writ was dated January 18, 191 7 and return- 
able the first Monday of March, 191 7. The writ of the Pro- 
prietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River was dated 

June 8, 191 7 and returnable the first Monday of August, 19 18. 

» 
32628 N. E. Structural Co. z's. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of contract brought in Superior Court 
for Middlesex County in the sum of fifty thousand dollars to 
recover for steel furnished by the plaintiff to the City of Lowell 
for the purpose of constructing a new high school. The matter 
was settled without trial in court, and it was agreed that an en- 
try of "Judgment in the sum of $42,414.52", and a further entry 
of "Judgment satisfied", might be entered. 

The writ was dated February 15, 19 18 and returnable the 
first Monday of April, 1918. 

2,288"/ James F. O'Donnell vs. City of Lowell. 
Same z's. Same. 

Both of these actions were brought in Superior Court ; the 
first as an action of tort, and the second a petition for a jury to 
assess damages suffered by said petitioner owing to the extension 



8 Report of City Solicitor 

of Dummer Street. The writ was dated March 4, 1918 and 
returnable the first Monday of May, 1918, and the petition was 
dated March 8, 1918, and returnable the first Monday of May, 
1918. The defendant fifed a plea in abatement protesting against 
the maintenance of the action of tort, stating that both actions 
were for the same cause, and the plaintifT agreed to discontinue his 
action of tort and proceed with the petition for the assessment 
of damages by a jury. The case came on to be heard before 
Judge Hitchcock, but owing to the non-appearance of the peti- 
tioner was non-suited. Thereafter it went to judgment, and 
judgment was entered for the defendant. 

29985 Frank IV. Crocker et als vs. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of contract brought in the Superior 
Court in the sum of twenty thousand dollars to recover for taxes 
paid under protest. The writ was dated November 30, 1916, 
and returnable to Superior Court for Middlesex County the first 
Monday of January, 1917. Trial was had at the April sitting of 
the Superior Court before Judge Chase, who found for the 
plaintifT in the sum of nine thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
seven dollars and seventy-five cents. Exceptions were filed by 
the defendant and a record of the case prepared for the Supreme 
Judicial Court. The case was argued at the October session of 
the Supreme Court before the full bench, who overruled the ex- 
ceptions of the defendant and sustained the finding of Judge 
Chase. 

Jessica Carr vs. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of tort brought in Superior Court by the 
Plaintiff to recover for personal injuries sustained while travel- 
ing on Bowers Street in the City of Lowell, in the sum of two 



Report of City Solicitor 9 

thousand dollars. The writ was dated January 3, 1918 and re- 
turnable the first Monday of February, 1918. This case was 
settled out of court in the sum of three hundred fifty dollars, 
and an agreement for judgment in said sum was filed with the 
Superior Court. 

City of Fall River vs. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of contract or tort brought in Superior 
Court in the County of Bristol in the sum of five hundred dollars. 
The write was dated Jan. 3, 19 18 and returnable the first Mon- 
day of March, 1918. This action was brought for the purpose 
of recovering for aid rendered by the City of Fall River to Hat- 
tie Lynch and Richard Armstrong and family, for which a bill 
had been sent to the Charity Department of the City of Lowell. 
The matter was taken up by the City Solicitor with City Solici- 
tor Grimes of Fall River and adjusted without trial in Court. A 
check for ninety-three dollars and sixty cents was sent to the 
City of Fall River, and the case dismissed. 

1 10277 Concrete Steel Products Co. vs. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of contract brought in Superior Court 
for Suffolk County in the sum of eight thousand dollars to re- 
cover for money alleged to be due to the plaintiff by the City 
of Lowell for certain steel furnished by said plaintiff for the 
construction of the new High School. The writ was dated May 
15, 1918 and returnable the first Monday of August, 1918. The 
matter was adjusted without trial in court, and it was agreed 
that the entry "judgment in the sum of $3,523.78, and judgment 
satisfied" might be made. 



10 Report of City Solicitor 

POLICE COURT 

91 Irene Sharkey, p. p. a. vs. City of Lowell. 

This was a friendly suit brought in the Police Court of 
Lowell by John Sharkey in behalf of Irene Sharkey, his minor 
daughter, to recover the sum of fifty dollars awarded her by 
the municipal council of the City of Lowell for personal injuries 
sustained by her on or about February 9, 19 17, due to the slip- 
pery condition of the stairway leading to the basement of the 
Butler School. The writ was dated March 1, 1918 and return- 
able to Police Court the second Saturday of March, 1918. 
Judgment in the sum of fifty dollars was entered by agreement, 
the case having been heard before Judge Enright. 



79 Catherine Cox, p. p. a. vs. City of Lowell. 

This was an action of tort brought in Police Court by James 
H. Cox to recover the sum of eighty dollars awarded by vote of 
the municipal council of the City of Lowell, for personal injuries 
sustained by his minor daughter, Catherine, while travel- 
ing on Sixth Avenue in the City of Lowell. The writ was dated 
January 14, 19 18 and returnable the fourth Saturday of February, 
1918. Judgment in the sum of eighty dollars was entered by 
agreement, the case having been heard before Judge Enright, 



Report of City Solicitor 11 

LAND COURT 
6760 Costas D. Papafagos el al Petr. vs. City of Lowell. 

This was a petition to the land court for the registration o£ 
certain land located on Varnum Avenue in the City of Lowell 
The City of Lowell filed an answer opposing the granting of said 
petition on the ground that the plan as filed by said petitioner 
did not show the line of Varnum Avenue as laid out by a res. - 
lution of the City of Lowell, dated December 4, 1893, an ^ in 
accordance with the plan on file in the office of the City Engineer, 
dated September, 1893. The petitioner agreed to file an amended 
plan, and upon the filing of said plan the City of Lowell with- 
drew its objections to the granting of said petition, which peti- 
tion was dated March 13, 19 18, and returnable to land court 
April 22, 1918. 

MATTERS NOW PENDING 

33762 Margaret Vaughan vs. City of Lowell. 

This is an action of tort brought in the Superior Court in 
the sum of five thousand dollars to recover for personal in- 
juries sustained by the plaintiff w r hile traveling on Carter Street 
opposite the Carter Street School, on or about February 17, 1918. 
The writ is dated October 11, 1918 and returnable to Superior 
Court of Middlesex County the first Monday of December, 19 18. 

Arthur J. Hebert, p. p. a. vs. City of Lowell. 
Joseph J . Hebert vs. Same. 

These are two separate actions brought in Superior Court for 
Middlesex County to recover for personal injuries sustained by 



12 Report of City Solicitor 

Arthur J. Hebert, a minor, while at the Lincoln School play- 
ground, on or about August 13, 1916. Both writs are dated 
December 27, 1918 and returnable the first Monday of February, 
19 1 8. The first action is brought in the sum of five thousand 
dollars and the second action in the sum of two thousand dollars. 

31280 Andrew G. Stiles vs. Charles J. Morse et als. 
Same vs. Same. 

These are two actions of tort brought in the Superior Court 
against the defendants, Charles J. Morse, George H. Brown 
and Francis A. Warnock, commissioners of the City of Lowell, 
by Andrew G. Stiles, treasurer of said city. The first writ is 
dated June 23, 191 7 and returnable the first Monday of August, 
191 7. The second write is dated January 5, 1918 and 
returnable the first Monday of February, 1918. Both 
writs were brought in the sum of five thousand dollars, 
and later motions were filed to increase the ad dam- 
num in each case to ten thousand dollars, which motions were 
allowed. These cases were consolidated and heard in the Super- 
ior Court before Judge Brown, who, for the purpose of having 
the matter go to the full court in order to determine the law in 
the case, ruled that the petitioner could recover. The case then 
went to the jury on a question of damages wholly, and an excep- 
tion was taken to the ruling of the court. The matters are now 
pending in the Supreme Court, and a decision is awaited. 

32521 Alice A. Bagley vs. City of Lowell. 

This is an action of tort brought in Superior Court for Mid- 
dlesex County in the sum of five thousand dollars to recover for 



Report of City Solicitor 13 

personal injuries sustained on or about June 22, 1917 while 
traveling- on Wamesit Street in the City of Lowell. The writ 
was dated February 15, 1918 and returnable the first Monday 
of March, 1918. 

32792 Fred H. Rourke, Tax Collector, vs. Frank Hanchett. 

This is an action of contract brought in Superior Court for 
Middlesex County in the sum of ten thousand dollars by Fred 
H. Rourke, treasurer and tax collector of the City of Lowell, 
to recover taxes due the City of Lowell from Frank Hanchett 
for the year 19 16. The writ is dated March 30, 19 18 and re- 
turnable to Superior Court the first Monday of May, 1918. 

387 City of Lowell vs. Herbert D. Oliver. 

This is an action of tort brought in Police Court in the sum 
of three hundred dollars by the City of Lowell against the de- 
fendant for alleged damage to the police automobile patrol, sus- 
tained on or about July 20, 1918, due to a collision between the 
said police automobile and the Reo automobile operated by said 
defendant. .The writ was dated August 27, 1918 and returnable 
to Police Court the fourth Saturday of September, 1918. On 
October 2, 1918, the defendant was defaulted. 

6838 John J. McMahon vs. City of Lozvell. 

This is a petition to the land court to register and confirm 
title to certain land in Lowell located in Salem Street and De- 
catur Avenue. The City of Lowell has filed its answer object- 
ing to said registration and the case is now pending. The pe- 
tition was dated May 1, 1918 and returnable to land Court May 
27, 1918. 



14 Report of City Solicitor 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 

During the year 19 18, thirty-two injuries to employees of 
the various departments in the city were reported to the law de- 
partment and investigated by said department. After inves- 
tigation, compensation was paid without question, liability being 
obvious, to twenty-two employees. Twu hearings were held be- 
fore the Industrial Accident Board. One hearing resulted in a 
finding for the employee, and the other, the case of Martin Flem- 
ing (deceased) vs. City of Lowell brought by his widow seeking 
four thousand dollars compensation, alleging that the injuries 
received by him by being run over by an automobile truck while 
sweeping the streets of the city, resulted in his death, concluded 
in a finding for the city. This hearing was held before a single 
member of the Board. Later an appeal was taken to the full 
Board, and the finding of the single member was sustained. To 
the remaining eight employees, whose injuries were of a minor 
character, no compensation was paid. Six employees were car- 
ried on the payroll from the year 191 7. 

The total amount paid out under the act during the year 
19 18 was $4761.24. $4244.97 of this amount was paid as com- 
pensation to injured employees; and the balance, $516.27, was 
expended for medical and hospital services, expenses of hear- 
ings, medicine, and for all other items of expense incident to 
the carrying on of this work. 

There were no fatal accidents during the year, nor any very 
serious ones. At the present time six employees are drawing 
compensation, pursuant to the Workmen's Compensation Act. 



Report of City Solicitor 15 



TABLE OF EXPENDITURES FROM 1914 TO 1918, INC, 







No. of 


Cases 


ca- 












cases 


rie 


d over 


Comp. pd. 


Other Ex. 


Total 


1914 




15 








$ 224.25 


$ 118.14 


$ 342.39 


1915 




28 








1740.42 


420.15 


2160.57 


1916 




38 








2725.58 


863.05 


3588.63 


1917 




23 




5 




244545 


536.30 


2981.75 


1918 


als 


37 




6 
11 




4244.97 


516.27 


4761.24 


Tot 


141 


$11380.67 


$2453-91 


$13834.58 


Total 


amount p 


aid 


out 


und< 


sr the act 








from 1914 to ] 


:9i8 


, bo 


th inclusive: 


$13,834.58 





DIED ON THE EIGHTEENTH DAY 
OF MAY, 1918 

CAPT. M. EUGENE McDONALD 



For more than a quarter of a century the investigator of claims 
for che law department of the City of Lowell. 

As a young man Capt. McDonald enlisted in the great Civil 
War for the emancipation of man and the preservation of liberty, 
where he served with honor and distinction from the beginning 
to the close of the war, being honorably discharged with the 
rank of first lieutenant of cavalry, Co. M. Thereafter he en- 
gaged in various industrial enterprises and later became attached 
to the police department of the City of Lowell, of which depart- 
ment for some period of time he was the chief executive officer. 
From this office, he became attached to the law department. 
His fearless and painstaking investigation of the many and 
varied claims presented against this city ; his sterling integrity 
and exalted plane of rectitude were recognized by all the solicit- 
ors under whom he served. His loyalty to the city, and its 
interests, and his religious devotion to the ideals of the republic 
stand forth clearly as a tribute to the soldier and the man. 

The city has lost in its service one, faithful and efficient ; 
the community, a sterling and unselfish character; and the 
nation, one whose devotion and patriotism were lasting beyond 
all else. 



Report of City Solicitor 17 

WORK AND BUSINESS OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Preparation and Trial of Cases in Court. 

Preparation of Releases, deeds and other legal documents. 

Preparation of Orders, Ordinances, Votes, and Resolutions. 

Preparation of Answers in Land Court Cases in which the 
city's interests are affected. 

Writing of contracts, formal agreements, and the writing of 
opinions and giving of advice to the various officers and heads 
cf the City Government. 

Investigation of minor claims against the city which do net 
enter court but are disposed of without suit by the municipal 
council upon the recommendation of the city solicitor. 

Investigations of injuries to employees, pursuant to the 
Workmen's Compensation Act, and the carrying out of the pro- 
visions of the Act. 

Attendance at Legislative Hearings and hearings before the 
Public Service Commission and other Commissions. 

Conveyance of real estate. 

The work of the law department is varied, and in addition 
fo the work above set forth, many matters of importance are 
6rought to the attention of the law department and carried 
through to a successful conclusion. 



On June 19, 1918, Alexander Duncan, a lieutenant in thu 
police department of the City of Lowell, was detailed from said 
department to the city solicitor's office as the inspector of claims, 
by Mayor Thompson to take the place left vacant by the death 
of Capt. McDonald. 



18 Report of City Solicitor 

OPINIONS. 

During the year 1918, in response to written requests the 
City Solicitor rendered the following written opinions to the fol- 
lowing officials : 

Jan. 4. JOHN W. KERNAN : Relative to vacations for 
hborers. 

Jan. 12. JOHN W. KERNAN: Relative to regularly 
employed laborers for the purposes of vacations. 

Jan. 15. PERRY D. THOMPSON: Relative to the 
standing of the treasurer of the City of Lowell. 

Jan. 29. JAMES E. DONNELLY: Relative to the claims 
of Messrs. Foye and Stiles for the payment of salary. 

Jan. 29. JOHN W. KERNAN : Relative to the amount of 
compensation which should be paid to Mr. White, a former em- 
ployee of the park department, now an enlisted man in the 
U. S. A. 

Feb. 20. PERRY D. THOMPSON: Regarding the lia- 
bility of the City of Lowell relative to the payment of back sal- 
ary to Sergt. Thos. McCloughry of the police department. 

Mar. 9. BOARD OF LICENSE COMMISSIONERS: 
Whether a certificate issued in compliance with the provisions of 
section 26, chapter 655, Acts of 1913, is sufficient to justify the 
commission in granting a common victualler's license, which 
grant will satisfy the provisions of section 48 of the same chapter? 

Mar. 12. MUNICIPAL COUNCIL: Relative to the sta- 
tus of the Lord case. 

Mar. 23. JOHN W. KERNAN: Relative to the jurisdic- 
tion over the Varnum. Avenue, Old Fair Grounds and Chambers 
Street properties. 



Report of City Solicitor 19 

Apr. 5. STEPHEN ELYNN : Whether a petition supple- 
mental to and in addition to the petition hied March 5, 19 18, rel- 
ative to Plan B charter, may he tiled in the city clerk's office and 
he treated as a part of the original petition. 

Apr. 27. MUNICIPAL COUNCIL: As to the intent and 
purpose of c. 254, General Acts of 191 7. 

May 13. JAMES E. DONNELLY : As to the present sta- 
tus of the Thomas Nesmith fund and the Carney Medal Trust 
fund. 

July 1. LICENSE COMMISSION. Regarding licenses 
to huy and sell old gold, silver, platinum, second-hand watches, 
precious stones and jewelry. 

Aug. 16. PERRY D. THOMPSON: Relative to the 
claim of the Wamesit Power Company for damages due to the 
proposed widening of Lawrence Street. 

Aug. 22. PERRY D. THOMPSON : Relative to the pow- 
er of the mayor to appoint a citizen to perform the services of an 
officer of the city who is absent in the military or naval service 
of the United States. 

Sept. 19. STEPHEN FLYNN : As to how the question 
of the adoption or rejection of "Plan C" should be placed on the 
ballot. 

Oct. 8. EDWARD H. FOYE : Relative to the honoring by 
the purchasing agent of requisitions bearing the signature of the 
chairman of the park commission. 

Nov. 7. STEPHEN FLYNN : Whether or not the regis- 
trars of voters are to use regular official voting lists of the year 
1918 from which to certify the signatures appearing on the so- 
called "Plan B" petition. 



20 Report of City Solicitor 

Pending Cases in which no changes have been made during 

the year 1918: 

3032 Bragg Mfg. Co. vs. City of Lowell (U. S. Ct.) 

869 Bernard Delaney vs. City of Lowell. 

922 James Smith ct al vs. City of Lowell. 

274 Peter Curran vs. City of Lowell. 

18230 John H. Handle y vs. City of Lowell. 

19073 Winifred Radigan vs. City of Lowell. 

20129 City of Lozvell i>s. Lizzie Fitzgerald alias. 

19911 Harry P. Graves, Adrnr. vs. City of Lowell. 

20176 Edward Cawley vs. City of Lozvell. 

882 Hassam Paving Co. vs. City of Lowell (U. S. Dist. Ct.) 

20591 Edwin E. McCausland vs. City of Lowell. 

J957 

Grade Crossings (1910- Equity.) 

1992 

2402 • R. C. Maxivell Co. vs. James E. O'Donnell et al. 

2552 Thos. F. Carroll et als vs. John B. Clancy. 

23009 Irving L. Hall vs. City of Lozvell. 

590 Sophia Hall vs. City of Lowell. 

301 George H . Jones vs. City of Lowell. 

24789 Estella H. Richardson vs. City of Lowell. 

26302 Edzvard D. Lyons vs. City of Lozvell. 
28322 Susan F. Taylor vs. City of Lozvell. 
26498 Dennis J, Cooney vs. City of Lozvell. 

26303 Lozvell Trust Co. vs. City of Lozvell. 



Report of City Solicitor 21 

28002 Edward Cawley vs. City of Lowell. 

28891 Margaret W . Merrill vs. City of Lowell. 

29008 George C. Dempsey et al vs. City of Lowell. 

29009 George C. Dempsey et al vs. City of Lowell. 

28892 P. Dempsey & Co. vs. City of Lowell. 
27988 Ida C. Braun vs. City of Lowell. 
27985 Elizabeth J. Shunny vs. City of Lowell. 

28003 James Crompton'vs. City of Lowell. 

27992 Lowell Day Nursery Assoc'n. vs. City of Lowell. 

27987 Almira Chapman vs. City of Lowell. 

27997 Joseph Gagnon et al vs. City of Lowell. 

Benjamin F. Nichols et al vs. City of Lowell. 

28896 Frank Mallorey vs. City of Lowell. 

31404 John H. Rigg, Admr. vs. City of Lowell. 

31995 James C. Donovan vs. City of Lowell. 

74 Leo ONeil vs. City of Lowell. 

30661 Margaret IV. Merrill vs. City of Lowell. 

32376 Julia E. Cote vs. City of Lowell. 

30678 City of Lowell vs. Lowell Trust Co. 

30798 City of Lowell vs. Andrew G. Stiles. 
30797 City of Lozvell vs. National Surety Co. 

30799 City of Lowell vs. U. S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. 
3 1 28 1 Edward H. Foye vs. Charles J . Morse. 



22 



Report of City Solicitor 



Name D 

Thomas Hopkinson 
John A. Knowles 
Richard G. Colby 
Seth Ames 
Isaac S. Morse 
Theodore H. Sweetser 
Arthur P. Bonney 
Alpheus R. Brown 
Robert R. Caverly 
Alpheus R. Brown 
Theodore H. Sweetser 
Alpheus R. Brown 
Tappan Wentworth 
George Stevens 
John F. McEvoy 
Joshua N. Marshall 
John F. McEvoy 
Geo. F. Richardson 
George F. Lawton 
Nathan D. Pratt 
George F. Lawton 
John J. Pickman 
William F. Courtney 
Frederic T. Greenhalge 
Larkin T. Trull 
John J. Hogan 
Francis W. Qua 
William A. Hogan 
J. Gilbert Hill 
William W. Duncan 
J. Joseph Hennessy 
Harold A. Varnum 
William D. Regan 



CITY SOLICITORS 










1840 


-191 


8 










>ate of Elec 


:ion 




Term of Service. 




Apr. 


7- 3 


.840 












May 


31, 3 


[841 












Apr. 


13, 3 


[842 












Aug. 


26, ] 


843 












July 


31, 3 


849 












Jan. 


3, 3 


c853 












Jan. 


9, 3 


[855 


. 










Jan. 


8, 3 


856 












Jan. 


12, ] 


[857 












Jan 


. 4, ] 


.858 












' Jan. 


3, 3 


[859 












Jan. 


6, 3 


[862 


Jan. 


6, 


1862 to Mar. 


1 


1864 


Feb. 


23, 3 


[864 


Feb. 


23, 


1864 to Mar. 


1 


1867 


Jan. 


7, 3 


[867 


Mar. 


1, 


1867 to Mar. 


1 


1870 


Jan. 


25, 3 


[870 


Mar. 


1, 


1870 to Mar 


1 


1872 


Jan. 


I, 3 


[872 


Mar. 


1, 


1872 to Mar. 


1 


1873 


Jan. 


6, 3 


[873 


Mar. 


1, 


1873 to Mar. 


1 


1875 


Feb. 


9, 3 


[875 


Mar. 


1, 


1875 to Mar. 


1 


1880 


Jan. 


5, 3 


[880 


Mar. 


1, 


1880 to Mar. 


1 


1883 


Jan. 


I, 3 


[883 


Mar. 


1, 


1883 to Mar. 


1 


1885 


Jan. 


5, 3 


[885 


Mar. 


1, 


1885 to Mar. 


30 


1886 


Apr. 


6, ] 


[886 


Apr. 


6, 


1886 to Mar. 


1 


1887 


Jan. 


14, ] 


[887 


Mar. 


1, 


1887 to Mar. 


1 


1888 


i Jan. 


24, ] 


[888 


Mar. 


1, 


1888 to Mar. 


1 


1889 


Jan. 


7, 3 


[889 


Mar. 


1, 


1889 to Mar. 


1 


1891 


Feb. 


10, ] 


891 


Mar. 


1, 


1891 to Aug. 


5 


1895 


Aug. 


I, - 


[895 


Aug. 


5, 


1895 to Mar. 


1 


1903 


Jan. 


6, 


[903 


Mar. 


2 
*•> 


1903 to Mar. 


1 


1905 


Jan. 


3, 3 


^905 


Mar. 


1, 


1905 to Mar. 


1 


1909 


Jan. 


4, " 


[909 


Mar. 


i, 


1909 to Jan. 


2 


1912 


Jan. 


2, ] 


[912 


Jan. 


2, 


1912 to Feb 


. 1 


5,1916 


Feb. 


5, 3 


[916 


Feb. 


5, 


1916 to Jan. 


30 


1917 


Feb. 


9, 3 


[917 


Feb. 


9, 


1917 to 







LIST OF JURORS 



FOR THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE YEAR 



1919 



i 




F A M TOBIN'S «Mfe»PRINTERY 



LIST OF JURORS 



Abbott, James M., 24 Fairmount St., broker. 

Abbott, Leon D., 5 Parkview ave., foreman. 

Abell, Orrin W., 31 Princeton st., printer. 

Achin, Henry, Jr., 9 Plymouth st., insurance. 

Achin, Victor, 749 Merrimack st., dealer. 

Achin, Wilfred J., 358 Colonial ave., chauffeur. 

Adams, John M., 511 School st., painter. 

Adams, Mark A., 43 Berkeley ave., clerk. 

Adams, Smith J., 11 Gilbride terrace, salesman. 

Adams, Walter S., 49 Sixth st., machinist. 

Adsit, Alvaro W., 228 East Merrimack st., second hand. 

Ahearn, Joseph J., Jr., 16 Leroy st., blacksmith. 

Alexander, J. Walter, 774 Moody st., clerk. 

Allard, Henry, 3 Lilley ave., clerk. 

Allard, Joseph J., 114 Ennell st., storekeeper. 

Allen, Walter M. N., 39 Elliott st., machinist. 

Ambrose, Joseph M., 9 Alder st., operative. 

Ambrose, William M., 176 Adams st., clerk 

Anderson, August, 23 Lundberg st., operative. 

Anderso*n, Charles E., 7 Bowden st., molder. 

Andrews, John A., rear 11 So. Whipple st., leatherworker. 

Andrews, J. Munn, 256 Andover st., manufacturer. 

Angier, Charles A., 5 Coburn ct., dealer. 

Archambault, Amedee, 742 Merrimack st., undertaker. 

Armitstead, Robert R., 126 West Meadow rd., dealer. 

Arnold, William A., 401 Beacon st., agent. 

Ashton, John T., 60 Orleans st., second hand. 

Ashworth, James, 137 Stackpole st., gentleman. 

Asselin, Charles A., 148 Ennell st., electrician. » 



LIST OF JURORS 

Atherton, Charles S., 12 Cheney pi., clerk. 
Angluin, David, 21 Crowley st., janitor. 
Ayer, Lorenzo, 557 Varnuni ave., gardener. 
Ayer, William A., 27 Varnuni ave., plumber. 
Ayotte, Edward, 83 Salem st., operative. 



B 



Bachelder, | Harry B., 158 Mt. Vernon st., manufacturer. 
Bachelder, Mark 0., 650 Stevens st., overseer. 
Bagley, Patrick J., 239 School St., dentist. 
Bagshaw, Charles H., 79 Wedge st., manufacturer. 
Bagshaw, Walter H., Jr., 148 Sanders ave., Mfgr. 
Balfrey, John, 65 Congress st., shoemaker. 
Bancroft, Frank M., 7 Brookside st., motorman. 
Bardzik, John, 94 Lakeview ave., barber. 
Barker, Edgar H., 9 Mt. Hope st., instructor. 
Barlofsky, Archie, 135 Howard st., clerk. 
Barnes, Henry W., 30 Huntington st., banker. 
Barber, Jesse, 76 Congress st., bleachery. 
Barber, Joseph, 252 Pawtucket st., mfgr. 
Barney, Fred M., 606 Stevens st., real estate. 
Barrett, Andrew E., 77 Mt. Vernon st., merchant. 
Barrett, Edward J., 94 School st., grocer. 
Barry, Charles E., 16 Spaulding st., operative. 
Barry, Henry, 98 Boisvert st., operative. 
Barry, Patrick H., 13 Sycamore st., watchman. 
Barry, John H., 15 Lombard st., plumber. 
Barry, George, 20 Lombard st., machinist. 
Barry, William A., 34 Laurel st., clerk. 
Barry, William J., 4 Hanks st., manufacturer. 
Basnett, George B., 625 East Merrimack st., barber. 
Bassett, Cyrus R., 23 Meadowcroft st., U. S. C. Co. 
Baxter, John J., 150 Agawam St., U. S. C. Co. 
Bean, Ralph M., 15 Eighth ave., secretary. 
Beane, Thomas J., 104 Pleasant st., life insurance. 
Beaudry, Francois, 111 Fulton st., teamster. 
Beaulieu, John H., 202 Hildreth st., dealer. 
Beaumier, Joseph, 11 Second st., clerk. 
Beaparlant, Telesphore, 33 Fred st,, dealer. 



4 LIST OF JURORS 

Beauregard, Oliver J., 868 Moody st., clerk. 

Beck, Edmund, 107 Warwick st., laborer. 

Belanger, Clovis, 768 Merrimack st., solicitor. 

Bell, Frank A., 19 Wachusett st., machinist. 

Bellefontaine, Miller, 130 Riverside st., furniture dealer. 

Beharrell, Joseph R., 121 Wentworth ave., carpenter. 

Bennett, George H., 181 East Merrimack st., blacksmith. 

Berard, Adelard, 577 Middlesex st., expressman. 

Bergeron, Albert, 510 Moody st., salesman. 

Bernier # Arthur J., 444 Fletcher st., clerk. 

Bernier, Samuel J., 22 Rockdale ave., clerk. 

Berry, Daniel F., 10 Marsh st., barber. 

Bibeault, Alfred, 110 Ford st., carpenter. 

Bibeault, Alfred W., 135 Liberty st., operative. 

Bibeault, Alphonse, 21 Wilder ave., stone cutter. 

Billingsley, Fred, 320 Wentworth ave., liquor dealer. 

Bishop, Herbert L., 28 May st., paymaster. 

Bissonnette, John, 47 Mt. Washington st., painter. 

Bissonnette, Zephyrin J., 300 Varnum ave., telegrapher. 

Bilodeau, Napoleon J., 713 Merrimack st., undertaker. 

Blazon, Donat, 131 Gershom ave., printer. 

Blodgett, Emery F., 585 Chelmsford st., bookkeeper. 

Blood, Cyrus F., 222 High st., clerk. 

Blowen, Herbert, 25 Harrison st., ice cream maker. 

Boardman, Edward, 467 Merrimack st., dealer. 

Boardman, J. Harry, 710 Andover st., banker. 

Boisvert, Jacques, 363 Hildreth st., builder. 

Boland, James J., 210 Appleton st., manager. 

Bonaccorsi, Lawrence, 14 Grand st., operative. 

Bonin, Honore, 90 Aiken st., barber. 

Bonin, Roderick, 78 Bridge st., printer. 

Boudreau, John B., 24 Crawford st., grocer. 

Boulais, Arthur N., 8 Dracut st., clerk. 

Boule, Lazare, 538 Moody st., operative. 

Boulger, John B., 835 Moody st., merchant. 

Bourque, Philip R., 19 Lombard st., carpenter. 

Bowles, Willis J., 926 Lakeview ave., operative. 

Box, John W., 7 Lyons st., beltmaker. 

Boyd, Joseph F., 31 Chestnut sq., manager. 

Boyle, James H., 110 Congress st., conductor. 

Bradley, Albert, 1022 Central st., pool room. 



LIST OF JURORS 

Brady, Thomas, 198 Mammoth rd., manager. 
Brachaud, Alberic A., 15 Dana st., manager. 
Branchaud, Charles E., 9 Somerset st., clerk. 
Bray, Richard, 23 Belrose ave., master mechanic. 
Brassard, Maurice, 4 Butterneld st., clerk. 
Brassard, Henry J., 68 Mt. Hope st., chauffeur. 
Brault, Aristide, 15 Cambridge st., packer. 
Breen, Stephen D., 57 Crawford st., ins. agent. 
Brennan, George F., 31 Crowley st., Lowell Gas Lt. Co. 
Brennan, Owen E., 20 Crowley st., hardware dealer. 
Brennan, Frank M., 150 Agawam st., brakeman. 
Brierley, Eugene L., 74 So. Loring st., painter. 
Briggan, George F., 22 Royal st., clerk. 
Brigham, Charles R., 99 So. Walker st., manager. 
Boughton, John L., 146 Chelmsford st., laborer. 
Brigham, Charles R., 70 Queen st., clerk. 
Brissette, Rupert N., 5 Crescent st., clerk. 
Broadbent, John W., 42 Maple st., weaver. 
Brodeur, Arthur, 13 Gold st., clerk. 
Brodeur, Arthur J., 546 Middlesex st., clerk. 
Brogan, Frank M., 88 Mt. Vernon st., insurance. 
Brogan, Joseph, 80 Mt. Washington st., machinist. 
Brosnahan, Patrick H., 796 Lawrence st., liquor dealer. 
Brosnan, Patrick T., 38 Second ave., salesman. 
Brosnan, Thomas, 100 White st., salesman. 
Brosseau, Albert, 16 Lawton st., machinist. 
Brousseau, Pierre A., 43 Essex st., clerk. 
Bourgeois, Gustave M., 76 Mt. Hope st., clerk. 
Brown, Patrick, 198 Cross st., operative. 
Brown, Patrick W., 8 Marsh st., operative. 
Brown, Patrick H., 980 Varnum ave., brakeman. 
Brown, William J., 23 Chase ave., clerk. 
Brunelle, Arthur J., 849 Moody st., clerk. 
Brunelle, Oliva, 33 Gershom ave., operative. 
Buckley, George, 190 High st., gas fitter. 
Buckley, James H., 23 Starbird St., cigarmaker. 
Buckley, John T., 50 Willow st., painter. 
Buckley, Timothy, 453 Riverside st., operative. 
Buote, Michael, 407 Moody st., operative. 
Burbank, Edgar P., 43 Second ave., operative. 
Burbank, Percival P., 14 Eighth ave., dealer. 



6 LIST OF JURORS 

Burbeck, William J., 32 Sheldon st., retired. 

Burke, Edward N., 216 Nesmith st., retired. 

Burke, William P., 30 Abbott st., watchman. 

Burkinshaw, Joseph, 25 Marlborough st., druggist. 

Burns, Arthur G., 160 Pine st., clerk. 

Burns, Francis A., 117 Stackpole st., bookbinder. 

Burns, George E., 756 Central st., clerk. 

Burns, James E., 23 State st., laborer. 

Burns, Charles H., 69 Fourth st., barber. 

Burt, John W., 16 Sargent st., beamer. 

Burtt, Fred K., 52 Hanks st., druggist. 

Burtt, Walter N., 385 Walker st., clerk. 

Burrill, John F., 612 Beacon st., clerk. 

Brock, Charles F., 47 Seventh ave., clerk. 

Brown, James T., 53 Tolman ave., operative. 

Byam, Arnold A., 12 Albert st., real estate. 

Byam, Otis, 79 Canton st., milk dealer. 

Byam, George A. Jr., 198 Methuen st., real estate. 



Caddell, Peter, 94 Viola st., overseer. 
Cadorette, Joseph, 118 Ennell st., mason. 
Cady, George L., Jr., 150 Mt. Vernon st., box maker. 
Cady, Louis, 629 East Merrimack st., park dep't. 
Caddell, John B., 37 VioJa st., patternmaker. 
Calnin, Martin, 7 Portei st., clerk. 
Callahan, George T., 122 Humphrey st., advertiser. 
Callahan, Phillip H., 82 Beacon st., painter. 
Callery, Bartholomew, 24 Bourne st., Health Dept. 
Calnan, Cornelius F., 84 Forrest st., U. S. C. Co. 
Camire, Evariste A., 753 Moody st., storekeeper. 
Cameron, James, 105 Georgia ave., dealer. 
Campbell, Abel R., 23 Harris ave., real estate. 
Campbell, Frank J., 711 Westford st., druggist. 
Campbell, George M., 48 East Merrimack st., dealer. 
Campbell, Thomas J., 848 Moody st., dealer. 
Campbell, James C, 52 Bartlett st., operative. 
Cannon, Michael F., 1 Woodbitry st., printer. 
Cantin, Eugene H., 104 School st., real estate. 



LIS"F OF JURORS 

Carkill, Jeremiah, 242 High St., provisions. 

Carmichael, James H., 59 Huntington st., overseer. 

Carney, Edward B., 25 Plymouth st., banker. 

Caron, Amedee, 99 Ennell st., tailor. 

Caron, Joseph, 74 Branch st., carder. 

Carpenter, Henry, 27 Ellis ct., shipping clerk. 

Carrier, Joseph, 208 Cumberland rd., dealer. 

Carrigg, John J., 35 Third st., stage manager. 

Carroll, Daniel F., 216 Thorndike st., master plumber. 

Carroll, John J., 97 Crawford st., machinist. 

Carroll, Joseph P., 780 Chelmsford st., nurse. 

Carroll, Thomas A., 81 Fremont St., publisher. 

Carroll, Vetrell, 94 Crawford st., operator. 

Carroll, William A., 97 Crawford st., druggist. 

Casey, James B., 603 Chelmsford st., manufacturer. 

Casey, James J., 815 Chelmsford st., manufacturer. 

Cassidy, Frank A., 8 Livermore st., assistant janitor. 

Cawley, William F., 85 Rogers st., clerk. 

Chaloux, William L., 88 Bartlett st., manager. 

Chandler, George R., 107 Holyrood ave., teller. 

Chambers, John H., 16 New st., teamster. 

Chapman, Herbert L., 48 Walker st., printer. 

Chappell, Francis, 18 Ash st., laborer. 

Charron, Edmond J., 142 Grand st., machinist. 

Charron, Sylva, 134 West st., chef. 

Chase, Walter I., 284 Gibson st., clerk. 

Cheney, Frederick R., 36 B st., tannery. 

Choate, Albert H., 40 Hawthorne st., drug clerk. 

Chouinard, Zenon, 689 Lakeview ave., repairer. 

Christman, Eustache, 154 Woburn st., grocer. 

Cinqmars, Euclide, 16 Endicott st., operative. 

daffy, John W., 28 Lawrence st., second hand. 

Clapp, Harry C, 17 Marlborough, dealer. 

Clancy, Arthur F., 85 Gershom ave., conductor. 

Clancy, John, 198 Riverside st., dealer. 

Clark, Cornelius E., 228 High st., retired. 

Clay, Harry E., 10 Orford st., operator. 

Clement, Charles M., 295 Foster st., carpenter. 

Clery, John H., 149 E. Merrimack st., clerk. 

Clowery, John J., 10 Alder st., barber. 

Cluin, John J., 130 Fort Hill ave., jeweler and optician. 



8 LIST OF JURORS 

Coates, David D., 62 Norcross st., foreman. 

Coburn, Harry W., 214 Third st., dentist. 

Coburn, Herbert E., 516 Andover st., real estate. 

Coburn, Joseph V. B., 215 Mammoth rd., grocer. 

Coburn, Clarence B., 215 Mammoth rd., retired. 

Coffey, James J., 21 Marginal St., dealer. 

Coffey, Humphrey, 130 Adams st., provisions. 

Coffey, Timothy J., 21 Marginal st., grocer. 

Cogger, John H., 80 White st., printer. 

Cogger, Patrick, 438 Riverside st., contractor. 

Coggeshall, Frederick H., 74 Nichols st., clerk. 

Cole, Fred H., 727 East Merrimack st., foreman. 

Cole, John W., 14 Fairfield st., restaurant. 

Cole, John H., 69 Bartlett st., operative. 

Coleman, Joseph H., 881 Bridge st., painter. 

Collins, Cornelius E., 394 High st., real estate and insurance. 

Collins, Cornelius, 11 Woodward ave., retired. 

Collins, John, 11 Woodward ave., clerk. 

Comerford, Charles P., 32 Nineteenth st., grocer. - 

Conant, Herbert J., 16 Grove st., clerk, B. & M. R. R. 

Connolly, John F., 108 Agawam st., wool sorter. 

Connor, Edward, 48 May st., second hand. 

Connor, John P., 445 Merrimack st., retired. 

Connors, Charles, 103 Westford st., clerk. 

Conroy, Robert F., 153 Appleton st., manager. 

Conroy, John, 509 East Merrimack st., operative. 

Conroy, Thomas, 124 Bartlett, clerk. 

Comvay, Anthony A., 11 Marlborough st., dealer. 

Conway, George F., 21 Ellsworth st., provisions. 

Conway, John T., 169 Sanders ave., express. 

Conway, Richard, 15 Windsor st., clerk. 

Cooney, Dennis J., 649 Westford sq., liquor dealer. 

Corbett, John H., 14 Burns st., provision dealer. 

Corcoran, John J., 438 Fletcher st., asst. ticket agent, 

Corcoran, Joseph N., 40 Fort Hill ave., printer. 

Cormier, Edmond, 18 Race st., clerk. 

Cosgrove, Christopher, 432 Pleasant st., agent. 

Cossette, P. Napoleon, 33 Wannalancit st., real estate. 

Cossette, Jeffrey, 40 Sparks st., dealer. 

Cote, Charles A., Jr., 52 Coral st., auto livery. 

Cote, Raoul, 161 East Meadow rd., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS 

Cottrell, William H., 11 Viola st., printer. 

Coughlin, James, 356 Parker st., shoemaker. 

Coupe, Matthew, 467 Merrimack st, retired. 

Cover, Frank G., 30 West Bowers st., dealer. 

Cox, Terence J., 239 Stackpole st., barber. 

Coyne, John J., 33 St. James st., salesman. 

Craig, Peter R., 59 Porter St., superintendent. 

Crane, Eugene F., 517 Westford st., real estate. 

Cornellier, Louis J., 479 Moody st., operative. 

Cronin, Cornelius F., 344 Varnum ave., clerk. 

Cronin, Dennis, 155 Stackpole st., waiter. 

Cronin, Joseph L., 347 High st., reporter. 

Cronshaw, John, 4 Cranes ave., inspector. 

Crosby, Frederick H., 14 Whidden St., plasterer. 

Crosby, Sterling B., 38 So. Loring st., real estate. 

Croteau, Eudore, 60 Lilley ave., clerk. 

Crowley, Robert E., Jr., 115 Fort Hill ave., real estate. 

Crowley, William L., 25 Sarah ave., collector. 

Cruickshank, Alexander, 20 Chelmsford st., dealer. 

Cryan, Martin, 90 White st., dealer. 

Cryan, Thomas E., 132 Grove st., conductor. 

Crysler, H. Stanley, 258 Gibson st., manager. 

Cuff, John H., 18 Agawam st., moulder. 

Cuff, Thomas F., 18 Agawam st., dentist. 

Cuff, Thomas S., 195 Moore st., druggist. 

Cull, John H., 84 Chapel st., printer. 

Cull, Thomas F., 249 East Merrimack st., steam fitter. 

Cummiskey, Arthur J., 175 Princeton st., automobile dealer. 

Cunningham, Clarence, 37 Durant st., steward. 

Cunningham, Fred W., 27 Fay st., shuttle maker. 

Cunningham, Samuel S., 129 Moore st., confectioner. 

Curley, John P., 15 Varney st., dealer. 

Curtin, David, 150 West Sixth st., conductor. 

Curtin, Edward A., 514 East Merrimack st., barber. 

Curtin, Joseph P., 514 East Merrimack st., machinist. 

Curran, John, 14 Mt. Grove st., inspector. 

Cushing, Joseph L., 32 Mt. Washington st., manufacturer. 

Cutler, John S., 840 Varnum ave., barber. 

Cutter, Benjamin F., 71 Canton st., dealer. 

Cutting, Lawrence F., 78 Methuen st., clerk. 



JO LIST OF JURORS 

D 

Dacey, James, 176 Andover st., clerk. 

Daidy, Michael A., 445 Merrimack st., engineer. 

Daigle, Henri, 17 Endicott st., operative. 

Dallaire, Pierre V., 126 West Sixth st., barber. 

Daley, Peter, 203 Broadway, laborer. 

Dalton, Francis M., 55 Nesmith st., stenographer. 

Dalton, John J., 275 Summer st,, clerk. 

Daly, John J., 19 North st., operative. 

Daly, John W., 76 Andrews st., clerk. 

Daly, William F., 20 Walden st., insurance agent, 

Dana, Harry C, 365 Worthen st., machinist, 

Danahy, James D., 32 State st,, plumber. 

Danahy, John J., 22 Crowley st., tinsmith. 

Dane, George F., 53 Oakland st,, B. & M. R. R. 

David, Albert W., 234 Gibson st., clerk. 

David, Olier, 38 Lilley ave., merchant. 

Davis, Fred M., 47 Lundberg st,, clerk. 

Dawson, John J., 445 Middlesex st., manager. 

Day, James E., 493 Gorham st,, agent. 

Davis, John, 444 Stevens st., moulder. 

Dean, Eugene, 203 Salem st., laborer. 

Dean, Eugene F., 203 Salem st,, clerk. 

Dean, Sam, 36 Chatham st., overseer. 

Dearborn, Lafayette A., 12 Totman st., engineer. 

Decatur, Herman B., 91 Norcross st., salesman. 

Delaney, Thomas B., 92 West st., installer. 

Delorme, Charles E., 368 Hildreth st,, dealer. 

Demaras, Harry, 14 Gilbride ter., constable. 

Dempsey, Bartholomew, 117 Crawford st., operative. 

Dempsey, Robert M., 117 Crawford st., operative. 

Denault, Nazaire, 223 Christian st., carpenter. 

Denault, Henry, 215 Christian st., tanner. 

Derby, Lucius A., 148 First st,, electrician. . 

Dery, Lewis, 63 Lilley ave., mason. 

Desaulnier, Olivier L., 14 West Bowers st., clerk. 

Descheneaux, Radrick, 767 Moody st., carpenter. 

Desilets, Horace, 27 Queen st,, clerk. 

Deslandes, Ambrose, 78 Queen st,, barber. 

Desmarais, Edelmard S., 941 Lakeview ave., plumber. 



LIST OF JURORS JJ 

Desmond, Daniel A., 19 Wright st. 1 , dealer. 
Desrosiers, Joseph Z., 43 Sparks si., dealer. 
Devlin, James P., 43 Willow st., printer. 
Dextra, Joseph, 518 Merrimack st., barber. 
Dexter, Royal K., 319 Wilder st., dealer. 
Dillworth, Daniel F., 95 Agawam st., clerk. 
Dineen, Michael J., 25 Oliver st., conductor. 
Dion, George, 185 Ludlam st., dealer. 
Doherty, Henry P., 78 Bridge st., master painter. 
Doherty, John J., 14 Hale st., mattress maker. 
Doherty, Michael F., 44 Marion st., confectionery. 
Donnelly, Edward J., 32 Lane st., conductor.. 
Donnelly, John F., 7 Newhall st., grocer. 
Donohue, Michael J., 3 Brooks st., salesman. 
Drewett, Frank, 42 Plummer ave., machinist. 
Donohoe, James H., 45 Coral st., clerk. 
Donovan, William H., 26 Madison st., dealer. 
Doole, George Lee, 241 Moore st., operative. 
Doran, Daniel, 173 School st., assistant superintendent. 
Doran, Henry F., 61 Butterfield st., trimmer. 
Dostaler, Frank X., 105 A st., provisions. 
Douglass, John H., 137 Pleasant st., lunch cart. 
Dow, Oscar C, 374 High st., clerk. 
Doyle, George J., 15 Whipple st., barber. 
Dozois, George H., 11 Spalding st., instructor. 
Dozois, Hector A., 67 Varney st., machinist. 
Dozois, Phillip H., 67 Varney st., operative. 
Dragon, Anthony F., 30 Sarah ave., collector. 
Drew, John B., 32 Burtt st., dealer. 
Drinan, George, 537 Merrimack st., machinist. 
Drury, John E., 44 Hanks st., plumber. 
Dwyer, John, 56 Waverley ave., painter. 
Dube, Joseph, Jr., 15 Livermore st., messenger. 
Dubois, Joseph, 793 Merrimack st,, insurance. 
Dubuque, George H., 196 Merrimack st., clerk. 
Duffy, Martin E., 1054 Bridge st., cigar maker. 
Duggan, Francis P., (U. S. C. Co.), 26 Agawam st. 
Dufresne, Edward P., 14 Wiggin st,, clerk. 
Dumas, George T., 11 Ash st., clerk. 
Duncan, John W., 8 Whipple st., plumber. 
Duncklee, Fred W., 62 Lundberg st., foreman. 



12 LIST OF JURORS 

Dunlap, Harry, 116 Hanks st., merchant. 
Dunlavey, John C, 647 Broadway, laborer. 
Dunlay, John F., 682 Chelmsford st., truckman. 
Dunlay, Patrick F., 16 Corson st., truckman. 
Dunn, Charles W., 94 Fort Hill ave., clerk. 
Dunn, Joseph, 610 School st., dealer. 
Dupont, Arthur, 4 Willie ave., fixer. 
Durant, Edward R., 157 Fort Hill ave., clerk. 
Durkin, John T., 38 Harrison st., printer. 
Durkin, Thomas J., 915 Lawrence st., compositor. 
Dursthoff, Charles C, 1500 Gorham st., overseer. 
Duval, Alfred, 544 Moody st., machinist. 



E 



Eagan, Thomas E., 93 Nelson ave., clerk. 
Eames, Melvin, 32 West Sixth st., second hand. 
Edwards, Arthur S., 40 Marginal st., dealer. 
Emmott, Walter H., 561 Westford st., manager. 
Eno, Pierre T. A., 204 Moody st., agent. 
Enright, George W., 344 Varnum ave., clerk. 
Erdis, Hugh W., 240 Liberty st., merchant. 
Erskine, Charles M., 25 Clark rd., real estate. 
Estabrook, Howard M., 22 Seventh ave., meat cutter. 
Estes, Fred A., 715 Westford st., insurance. • 



Fahey, William J., 862 Central st., plumber. 
Fairburn, George C, 15 Clitheroe st., provision dealer. 
Fallon, Andrew J., 108 Meadowcroft st., foreman. 
Farley, Harry P., 36 Prescott st., bottler. 
Farrell, John M., 2 West View st., auctioneer. 
Farrell, Samuel T., 358 Wentworth ave., salesman. 
Farrington, John C, 182 Perry st., clerk. 
Favreault, William A., 190 Pawtucket st., clerk. 
Fecteau, Alexis F., 740 Merrimack st., clerk. 
Fee, Thomas F., 126 Bartlett st., tailor. 
Fels, Max W., 957 Lakeview ave., clerk. 
Fife, James, 46 Merrill st., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS U 

Fielding, Albert, 16 State st., pressman. 
Fielding, Joseph E., 21 Olney st., merchant. 
Filion, J. Anaclet, 348 Hildreth st., jeweler. 
Finlay, Martin B., 115 Andrews St., machinist. 
Finlay, William D., 204 Moore st., metal worker. 
Finnegan, Frank J., 15 Crane ave., collector. 
Finnegan, Daniel T., 11 Sidney st., teamster. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas J., 55 Grove st., dealer. 
Flannery, Charles Thomas, 132 Pleasant st., conductor. 
Flather, Frederick A., 68 Mansur st., treasurer. 
Fleet, Sidney R., 329 East Merrimack, journalist. 
Fleming, Samuel, 3 Methuen st., bootmaker. 
Flood, James H., 118 Bartlett st., dealer. 
Flood, Terence E., 28 Mt. Grove st., carpet weaver. 
Flynn, Eugene, 160 Agawam st., second hand. 
Foisey, Joseph A., 327 Hildreth st., baker. 
Foisey, Philip, Jr., 24 Gorham st., cook. 
Ford, William Nathan, 15 Harding st., janitor. 
Forrest, Charles M., 30 Sanders ave., lumber dealer. 
Forrest, Telesphore, 859 Lawrence st,, tannery. 
Fortier, Joseph M. G., 36 Riverside st,, watchmaker. 
Fortin, Antoine, 903 Moody st., clerk. 
Fortin, Leonce, 43 Plymouth st., manager. 
Foye, Daniel, 769 Westford st., dealer. 
Foye, John J., 469 Pine st., dealer. 
Frawley, David F., 91 Eustis ave., glazier. 
Frayne, John F., 117 Willie st., barber. 
Frechette, Wilfrid, 769 Merrimack st., overseer. 
French, Albert F., 213 Park View ave., manufacturer. 
French, Vernon A., 334 Mammoth rd., auto livery. 
Frost, Charles E., 285 Princeton st., pedlar. 
Frye, Austin A., 105 Eighteenth st., druggist. 
Fuller, George B., 1524 Gorham st., lumber man. 
Fullerton, Robert J., 17 Dutton st,, second hand. 



a 



Gagnon, George, 837 Moody st., clerk. 
Gagnon, Joseph A., 67 Mt, Hope st., buyer. 
Gale, Charles A., 23 Jenness st., agent. 



U LIST OF JURORS 

Gallagher, Charles A., 85 Gershom ave., inspector. 

Gallagher, Charles J., 191 Pleasant st,, druggist. 

Gallagher, Edward, 300 Wilder st., hotel. 

Gallagher, James J., 168 Cumberland rd., cigar store. 

Gallagher, Thomas J., rear 34 Coburn st,, clerk. 

Galley, Arthur C, 17 Winthrop ave., draughtsman. 

Galley, John E., 79 B st., carpenter. 

Galvin, William H., 535 Lawrence st,, fireman. 

Gamache, Emile, 9 Rhodora st,, grocer. 

Gannon, Daniel J., 71 Dover st., dealer. 

Gardner, John J., 17 Waterford st., merchant. 

Gargan, Frank, 81 Bartlett st,, operative. 

Garland, Arthur W., 27 So. Loring st,, railroad clerk. 

Garvey, Thomas F., 72 Lilley ave., cigar maker. 

Gaudette, George, 1117 Middlesex st,, teamster. 

Gaudette, Octave, 44 So. Loring st., wholesale confectioner. 

Gauthier, Alfred J., 38 Lilley ave., blacksmith. 

Gelinas, Victor, 94 Ford st., grocer. 

Gendreau, Flavien, Circuit ave., tannery. 

Genereux, Hildege, 17 James st,, clerk. 

Genest, Arthur, 475 Varnum ave., contractor. 

George, Fred A., 150 Hampshire st., retired. 

Gerow, David, 158 Chelmsford st,, hay and grain. 

Gibbons, Michael, 542 Gorham st,, machinist. 

Giblin, John J., 176 Ennell st., musician. 

Gilbert, Arthur D., 173 Foster st., bookeeper. 

Gilbert, Franz S., 50 Laurel st., overseer. 

Gilbride, Walter J., 11 West st., druggist. 

Gildee, James B., 35 Oak st., clerk. 

Gill, Edmund J., 768 Merrimack st., state house, Boston. 

Gill, Homer J., 28 Walker st., clerk. 

Gilman, Albert I., 20 East Pine st., foreman. 

Gilmore, Fred C, 39 Walnut st,, humane society. 

Gilroy, Frank A., 145 Merrimack st., printer. 

Giroux, Frederick, 156 Riverside st., teamster. 

Golden, John F., 8 Butterfield st,, clerk. 

Gonzales, Havier L., 126 Gorham st., cutler. 

Gookin, James, 74 Huntington st, furniture business. 

Gookin, John J., 15 Aberdeen st,, manager. 

Gormley, Joseph H., 11 Lyon st,, insurance. 

Gordon, George W., 61 Loring st., laborer. 



LIST OF JURORS J5 

Gordon, J. Eugene, 100 So. Walker st., undertaker. 
Gorman, James E., 566 Westford st., shoe dealer. 
Grady, John J., 576 School st., laborer. 
Grady, William E., 881 Varnum ave., manager. 
Grandchamps, Napoleon, 12 Arthur ave., clerk. 
Gray, Chester M., 423 Stevens st., insurance. 
Gray, Harry, 93 Dover st., provision dealer. 
Gray, John J., 236 Plain st., real estate agent. 
Gray, Michael J., 10 Kinsman st., clerk. 
Grew, Raymond Franklin, 529 Moody st., clerk. 
GreAv, Wilbert, 529 Moody st., clerk. 
Green, John J., 3-37 Bartlett st., laborer. 
Goodwin, William B., Ill Chestnut st., organist. 
Gionet, Aime, 158 Fourth ave., insurance. 
Giroux, Arthur H. R., 227 White st., insurance. 
Gulline, Percy, 197 Pawtucket st., mfgr. 
Guimond, Adelard, 80 D st., brakeman. 
Guimond, Amedee, 101 Aiken ave., knitter. 
Gumb, Richard, 63 Oakland st., mfgr. 
Guyette, Walter E., 372 Parker st., real estate. 

H 

Hackett, David, 16 Crawford st., Water Works. 
Haggart, Daniel L., 60 Bartlett st., mule spinner. 
Haggerty, Joseph, 125 Grove st., telegrapher. 
Haggerty, Timothy, 726 Lawrence st., helper. 
Haggerty, Michael, 171 Powell st., blacksmith. 
Haines, Olin M., 18 Upham st., machinist. 
Hale, Milo W., Jr., 9 Glidden ave., clerk. 
Haley, Michael, 8 State st., mason. 
Halstead, Charles W., 259 Princeton st., elec. It. station. 
Hamel, Alfred, 100 Shaw st., checker. 
Hamel, Charles, 203 Ludlam st., contractor. 
Hamil, Bernard, 134 Dummer st., mason. 
Hanson, James S., 584 Westford st., horse dealer. 
Harrison, Joseph W., 566 School st., overseer. 
Hart, Daniel J., 52 Colonial ave., master baker. 
Hart, John J., 336 East Merrimack st., conductor. 
Hartigan, Chester F., 137 Moore st., shipper. 
Hartigan, Thomas T., 137 Moore st., folder. 



J6 LIST OF JURORS 

Hartley, John F., 40 So. Whipple st., machinist. 
Hartnet, John J., 105 Liberty st., operative. 
Harrison, Clifton B., 16 Bellevue st., machinist. 
Hartwell, George W., 159 Sayles st., foreman. 
Harvey, Joseph, 843 Moody st., master plumber. 
Hawes, William H., 59 Canton st., broker. 
Hayes, Daniel, 73 Fletcher st., motorman. 
Hayes, William A., 43 Webber st., conductor. 
Healey, Thomas, 921 Lawrence st., overseer. 
Hearn, James, 50 Corbett st., watchman. 
Hebert, Elzear R., 772 Moody st., clerk. 
Heller, George E., 74 Inland st., machinist. 
Hemman, Richard C, 245 Stevens st., cashier. 
Henley, John J., 50 Methuen st., tailor. 
Hennerbery, Stephen, 121 Agawam st., U. S. C. Co. 
Henry, Daniel P., 140 Andover, truckman. 
Hersey, Freeman S., 143 Forrest st., machinist. 
Hessian, Thomas F., 30 Chippewa st., machinist. 
Hetu, Hermidas, 12 Dane st., second hand. 
Hersome, Albra, 22 Ash st., engineer. 
Hickey, Walter, 643 Westford st., foreman. 
Higgins, John J., 135 Andrews st., undertaker. 
Higgins, Joseph J., 84 Mt. Washington st., grocer. 
Hiland, Michael, 25 Ash st., operative. 
Hill, James, 37 Whipple st., motorman. 
Hoar, Martin J., 31 London st., folder. 
Hoar, Michael H., 161 Walker st., insurance. 
Hogan, James J., 37 Cosgrove st., provisions. 
Hogan, John, 54 Bartlett st., shoemaker. 
Holmes, Percy, 837 Lakeview ave., wool sorter. 
Home, Fred, 150 Westford st., dealer. 
Houde, Theotime, 27 Sarah ave., clerk. 
Howell, Wakefield D., 69 Nichols st., clerk. 
Howes, George E., 131 Varnum ave., salesman. 
Howes, Walter I., 9 Mt. Grove st., stockfitter. 
Hoyle, Albert, 124 Mt. Hope st., plumber. 
Hoyle, Richard, Jr., 101 Congress st., laborer. 
Hubert, Romeo, 102 Cabot st., dealer. 
Hughes, Joseph, 105 So. Highland st., grinder. 
Hull, Frank B., 606 Stevens st., foreman. 
Humphriss, Frederick G., 70 Smith st., watchman. 



LIST OF JURORS 17 



Hunt, Leonard D., 234 Cabot st., overseer. 
Hunter, James F., Ill Liberty st., barber. 
Huntington, Edward W., 69 Stevens st., clerk. 
Hylan, John B., 28 Nesmith st., gentleman. 
Hyde, Daniel, 42 Humphrey st., machinist. 



Ingham, Fred, 469 Wilder st., dealer. 
Inglis, John J., 52 Hampshire st., clerk. 
Ineson, William H., 1 Hampshire st., loom fixer. 
Irish, Alanson E., 137 Stackpole st., clerk. 
Irwin, John M., 53 St. James st., confectioner. 



Jackson, John S., 120 Gates st., clerk. 
Jalbert, Joseph, 100 Fourth ave., contractor. 
Jantzen, Joseph W., 3 Olive st., dentist. 
Jean, Amedee, 39 Melvin st., retired. 
Jenness, Fred M., 710 Chelmsford st., real estate. 
Jennings, Joseph, 859 Lawrence st., retired. 
Jensen, Otto, 23 Webber st., receiver. 
Jewett, Frank E., 1281 Middlesex st., dealer. 
Jodoin, Augustus J., 28 Campaw st., operative. 
Jodoin, Joseph H., Jr., 23 Claire st., machinist. 
Johnson, Francis, 494 Lawrence st., real estate. 
Johnson, Michael J., 328 Suffolk st., organist. 
Johnson, Curtis W., 416 Westford st., bookkeeper. 
Johnson, John H., 487 Andover st., carpenter. 
Johnson, Thomas J., 183 Wilder st., clerk. 
Johnston, Alexander, 173 Stackpole st., baker. 
Johnston, William L., 173 Stackpole st., baker. 
Jones, Edwin F., 93 West st., decorator. 



Kearns, George J., 192 School st., clerk. 
Keefe, George F., 101 Beech st., electrician. 
Kelleher, John J., 44 Lawrence st., provisions. 



18 



LIST OF, JURORS 



Kelleher, Michael, 111 Agawam St.. driver. 

Kelley, Thomas L., 683 Rogers st., Mass. mills. 

Kelley, Thomas F., 578 Andover st., clerk. 

Kelley, Patrick J., 31 Glare st,, machinist. 

Kelley, William A., 799 Princeton st., dealer. 

Kelley, William M., 32 John st,, janitor. 

Kelsey, John H., 52 Humphrey st,, plumber. 

Kenefick, William, 215 Stackpole st,, engineer. 

Kennedy, James J., 24 Ash st., retired. 

Kennedy, William R., 114 Warwick st,, electric light trimmer. 

Kennedy, Chester A., 63 C st., clerk. 

Kershaw, Samuel, 596 Bridge st,, dealer. 

Kew, Loring R., 17 Princeton st., dealer. 

Keyes, Henry J., 9 Fort Hill ave., clerk. 

Killerby, Frank, 26 London st., bookbinder. 

Killpatrick, Charles T., 27 Maryland ave., real estate. 

Killpatrick, Edwin W., 360 Wilder st., clerk. 

Kilpatrick, John A., 21 Bennett st., carpenter. 

Kilroy, John, 58 Fremont st., insurance agent. 

Kimball, Clarence L., 785 Merrimack st., machinist. 

Kimball, George. D., 785 Merrimack st., real estate. 

King, Walter, 205 Stackpole st,, clerk. 

King, Joseph D., 67 Bartlett st,, lather. 

King, Arthur, 205 Stackpole st., electrician. 

Kinsella, John F., 50 B st., dealer. 

Kirwin, John W., 919 Lawrence st., nickel plater. 

Kittredge, Horace V., 34 Third ave., mason. 

Kivlan, John H., 73 Moore st,, bookkeeper. 

Knapp, Fred L., 76 Florence ave., clerk. 

Knapp, Harry P., 324 Andover st,, pres. Talbot Co. 

Knowlton, Harry W., 24 Monadnock ave., draughtsman. 



Labrie, Eugene, 2-103 Tucker st,, manager. 
Lambert, Maurice J., Jr., 342 Westford st,, dealer. 
Lamberton, John A., 114 So. Loring st., editor. 
Lazarakis, John F., 508 Market st., merchant. 
Laflamme, Gerdia J., 17 Burlington ave., clerk. 
Lafleur, Frederick, 1081 Middlesex st. 
Lafleur, Harvey A., 44 West Meadow rd., collector. 



USX OF JURORS 19 

Landers, Charles J., 27 Wamesit St., printer. 

Landry, Edward, 15 Gershom ave., clerk. 

Landry, Ernest, 15 Gershom ave., clerk. 

Lapointe, Martin, 41 Nichols St., harness maker. 

Larivee, John B., 187 Cumberland rd., conductor. 

Larochelle, Elzear J., 814 Moody St., reporter. 

La Rock, Joseph, Jr., 57 Marshall st., operative. 

Larrabee, George C., 15 Corner st., merchant. 

Latham, Frank, 587 Stevens st., clerk. 

Laurin, Carl G., 40 Lundberg st., stone cutter. 

Lavelle, Raymond J., 282 Appleton St., advt. solicitor. 

Lavallee, Henry, 75 Gershom ave., jeweler. 

Lavallee, Rosario, 75 Gershom ave., jeweler. 

Lavoie, Napoleon J., 515 Wilder st,, milkman. 

Lavoie, Arthur, 114 Ford st., grocer. 

Laycock, Joseph Y., 28 Blossom st., chemist, 

L'Esperance, Wilford, 30 Dutton st., druggist. 

Leadbetter, Chipman 0., 83 Gates st., deputy superintendent. 

Leary, Daniel, 118 Mt, Washington st., plumber. 

Leary, Dennis F., 339 Lincoln st., real estate dealer. 

Leary, Jeremiah F., 99 Pleasant st., janitor. 

Lecam, Joseph H., 30 Haines ave., clerk. 

Lebrun, Nelson J., 192 Pawtucket st., clerk. 

Lederman, Philip M., 65 Stevens st., dealer. 

Lee, John J., 147 Gershon ave., salesman. 

Lee, Robert J., 55 Laurel st., machinist. 

Lee, Michael A., 64- Bartlett st., carpenter. 

Lees, George, 25 Congress st., dyer. 

Leggat, Horatius B., 640 Broadway, teacher. 

L'Heureux, Henry, 121 Gershom ave., operative. 

Lemkin, Morris, 5 Hampshire st., dealer. 

Leveille, Arthur, 122 Mt. Washington st., clerk. 

Lew T , Fred P., 477 Merrimack st., dyer. 

Lightowler, Freeman, 136 Grand st,, clerk. 

Little, Edwin F., 815 Moody st., stock broker. 

Livingston, Cornelius S., 208 Branch st., paymaster. 

Livingston, Ephraim D., 287 Westford st,, watchman. 

Long, Dennis A., 610 Andover st., Prop. Sunday Telegram. 

Loranger, Arthur, 14 Law T ton st., operator. 

Loranger, Louis, 67 Branch st., clerk. 

Loranger, Zephirin, Jr., 16 Ash st., clerk. 



20 LIST OF JURORS 

Loezau, Napoleon M., 45 Endicott st., clerk. 
Lull, George E., 11 Nesmith st., merchant. 
Lundgren, Ernest, 31 Houghton st., dealer. 
Lunt, Jason, 18 Lane st., merchant. 
Lussier, Ferdinand, 83 Lilley ave., operative. i 

Lussier, George H., 903 Moody st., operative. 
Lussier, Joseph A., 28 Grand st., machinist. 
Lussier, Rosario, 170 Ennell st., clerk. 
Lussier, William 0., 9 Bowers st., machinist. 
Lyle, James E., 19 Summit st., jeweler. 
Lynch, Thomas J., 8-33 So. Whipple st., laborer. 
Lynch, Patrick, 159 Walker st., barber. 
Lyons, John K., 7 Westford st., pin maker. 
Lyons, Maurice T., 41 St. James st., motorman. 
Lyons, Murthey, 25 Cross st., clerk. 
Lyons, Richard, 48 Prospect st., foreman. 
Lyons, Patrick A., 2-267 Worthen st., machinist. 



M 



Mack, John F., 292 East Merrimack st., clerk. 
Magee, John J., 169 High st., grocer. 
Magras, Joseph, 763 Moody st., clerk. 
Maguire, George F., 280 High st., grocer. 
Maguire, John E., 35 Mead st., janitor. 
Maguire, Thomas F., 236 Rogers st., solicitor. 
Maguire, Philip F., 57 Sidney st., weaver. 
Maguire, Patrick J., 35 Mead St., retired. 
Mahoney, John J., 22 Burlington ave., clerk. 
Mahoney, John P., 37 Laurel st., dealer. 
Mahoney, Michael J., 550 Westford st., salesman. 
Mahoney, Thomas, Jr., 46 Butterfield st., clerk. 
Major, Frank A., 60 Rea st., second hand. 
Maloney, James R., 97 Pleasant st., laborer. 
Maloney, John J., 195 Pleasant st., barber. 
Maloney, Michael J., 195 School st., gardener. 
Mansfield, George F., 306 Wilder st., bookkeeper. 
Mansur, Arthur F., 182 Andover st., retired. 
Manseau, Videl Z., 158 Branch st., clerk. 
Marchand, Joseph P., 18 Sargent st., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS 2J 

Marin, Joseph, 213 Pawtucket st., real estate. 
Markham, Michael J., 78 Chauncey ave., liquor dealer. 
Martell, Hormidas J., 799 Moody st., supt. wire works. 
Marden, Philip S., 11 Fairview st., managing editor. 
Martin, Edward F., 39 Durant st., retired. 
Martin, John EL, 196 Mt. Pleasant st., merchant. 
Martin, John F., 45 Bartlett st., clerk. 
Martin, Mizael, 2-500 Moody st., tailor. 
Mason, Charles, 21 Belle ave., machinist. 
Mason, Lewis, 28 Belle ave., machinist. 
Matte, Edmond, 36 Gardner ave., tinsmith. 
Maxwell, John F., 124 Hanks st., overseer. 
May, Thomas, 1406 Varnum ave., gate tender. 
Mayberry, Solomon S., 54 Jenness st., real estate. 
McAleer, James E., 129 Llewellyn st., clerk. 
McAloon, Fred F., 14 Pleasant st., weaver. 
McAloon, John B., 112 Sixth st., weaver. 
McAvoy, Thomas, 1 Fowler rd., dealer. 
McBrayne, Lewis E., 6 Belmont st., asst. managing editor. 
McCaffrey, John H., 186 Pleasant st., carpet weaver. 
McCann, Patrick, 412 Lincoln st., dresser. 
McCarron, Anthony, 142 Concord st., grocer. 
McCarron, Philip J., 76 Concord st., grocer. 
McCartin, Patrick, 116 Pleasant st., conductor. 
McCarthy, Andrew, 656 Gorham st., advertising. 
McCarthy, John P.^ 9 Pihl st., machinist. 
McCarthy, John P., 744 Merrimack st., operative. 
McCarthy, Timothy F., 28 Butterfield st., clerk. 
McCarthy, James F., Jr., 28 Butterfield st., clerk. 
McCluskey, Frank H., 7 Keene st., machinist. 
McCluskey, William J., 7 Keene st., reporter. 
McCormick, John E., 108 Livingston ave., clerk. 
McCullough, John, 281 High st., grocer. 
McDonald, John J., 208 Mt. Hope st., second hand. 
McElholm, William H., 465 Westford st., plumber. 
McElroy, George T., 157 Agawam st., painter. 
McElroy, Samuel H., 15 Chestnut sq., operative. 
McEvoy, Arthur M., 104 Tenth st., student. 
McGauvran, William H., 172 School st., merchant. 
McGenniss, James, 23 Read st., insurance. 
McGilly, Patrick, 75 Hoyt ave., wool sorter. 



22 LIST OF JURORS 

McGlinchey, Michael, 84 Manchester st., grocer. 
McGovern, Patrick, 32 Bartlett, shoemaker. 
McGreevey, Thomas X., 216 Forest st,, operative. 
McGreevy, Eugene, 216 Foster st., clerk. 
McHugh, Michael F., 258 Merrimack st., clerk. 
McHugh, William E., 77 Fremont st., compositor. 
Mclninch, Robert J., 39 Chestnut sq., presser. 
Mclntyre, William G., 101 Norcross st,, clerk. 
McKenna, George B., 13 Cosgrove st., undertaker. 
McKenna, George T., 64 Otis st., conductor. 
McKenney, Charles H., 133 White st., engineer. 
McKeon, James E., 15 Seventh ave., clerk. 
McKinnon, Murdock, 1782 Middlesex st., marketman. 
McMahon, Frank, 2 Brooks st., clerk. 
McMahon, Joseph F., 456 Chelmsford st., plumber. 
McMahon, Joseph H., 23 Fourth ave., conductor. 
McMahon, William H., 90 White st., steamfitter. 
McNabb, James S., 106 Pleasant st, laundryman. 
McNabb, John H., 108 Pleasant st,, laundry. 
McOsker, Frank E., 576 School st., waiter 
McOsker, George M., 17 Liberty st,, barber. 
McOsker, James F., 39 Grace st., tool maker. 
McOsker, John J., 12 Andrews st., foreman. 
McQuade, Arthur F., 11 Weschester st., fixer. 
McQuade, Daniel E., 600 Andover st., dealer. 
McQuaid, Arthur J., 197 Pleasant st., loomfixer. 
McQuade, Hugh B., 10 Pleasant st,, second hand. 
McSorley, Christopher, 155 Fayette st., clerk. 
McSorley, John F., 332 Wentworth ave., dealer. 
Mealey, Frank L., 509 School st., copper stamps. 
Meehan, Edward J., 289 Concord st., teamster. 
Meehan, John P., 26 Cosgrove st., granite cutter. 
Meehan, Joseph P., 196 Westford st., clerk. 
Meloy, Fred'k F., 30 Fort Hill ave., contractor. 
Mercier, Chester, 284 Stevens st., clerk. 
Mercier, Ernest B., 38 Aiken ave., baker. 
Mellen, Edward, 74 Pentucket ave., laborer. 
Mellor, George H., 15 Belmont st., overseer. 
Mercier, J. M. Eugene, 82 Fisher st,, dealer. 
Merrill, Herbert C, 157 Nesmith st., chemist. 
Merritt, William H., 262 Concord st,, bartender. 



LIST OF JURORS 23 

Mevis, George B., 869 Bridge St., merchant. 

Miller, Charles II., 13 Harrison st., conductor. 

Minahan, James H., 74 Aiken ave., operative. 

Miskell, Martin J., 292 East Merrimack st., theatrical. 

Mitten, Anthony D., 43 A st., blacksmith. 

Mueller, George A., 91 Willie st., clerk. 

Muldoon, Owen, 259 Branch st., laborer. 

Murphy, Jeremiah F., 315 Summer st., manufacturer. 

Molloy, Andrew, 339 Riverside st., Lowell Water Works. 

Monahan, Patrick R., 39 West Fifth st., teamster. 

Monette, Hector, 14 Eustis ave., teamster. 

Monier, Raoul H., 64 Lilley ave., floorwalker. 

Mongeau, George E., 444 Fletcher st., merchant. 

Moody, Percy H., 173 Stackpole st., clerk. 

Moran, John, 40 Alder st., machinist. 

Morin, Ovila, 129 White st., dealer. 

Morrissey, Frank T., 46 Albion st., dealer. 

Mulcahy, M. Wilfred, 109 Rogers st., dealer. 

Mullin, Frank, 14 Lundberg st., electrician. 

Mullin, J. Eugene, 6 Bleachery st., insurance. 

Mulcahey, Thomas E., 665 School st., painter. 

Mullaney, John J., 25 Varney st., plumber. 

Mullaney, Michael, 4 Litchfield terr., plumber. 

Mulno, Harry 0., 324 Boyiston st., superintendent. 

Mullen, Leon H., 33 Bourne St., clerk. 

Mullen, Joseph, 23 Burtt st., merchant. 

Murphy, Frank, 52 Central st., laborer. 

Murphy, James F., 35 Potter st., laborer. 

Murphy, James A., 86 Hanks st., overseer. 

Murray, John J., 128 Hoyt Ave., clerk. 

Murphy, John F., 426 Varnum ave., farmer. 

Murphy, Joseph F., 278 High st., printer. 

Murphy, Thomas F., 189 Parker st., plumber. 

Murphy, William J., 74 Agawam st., dealer. 

Murray, Frank, 86 Fourth ave., blacksmith. 

Murray, John, 139 Chapel st., clerk. 

Muzzey, Walter L:, 25 Fort Hill ave., salesman. 

Myers, James W., 21 Albert st., assistant superintendent. 

Myers, John Y., 104 South Whipple st., dealer. 



24 LIST OF JURORS 

N 

Neeson, John J., 210 Cross st., machinist. 
Nelson, James, 528 Andover st., supt. 
Nestor, Patrick F., 348 Stackpole st., lamplighter. 
Nichols, Henry J., 338 Varnum ave., gardener. 
Normanden, Charles, 34 Hancock ave., tailor. 
Novell, Maurice H., 3-449 Moody st., barber. 
Nugent, Michael, 13 L st., operative. 



Oates, William, 44 Crawford st., machinist. 

O'Beirne, Thomas, 704 Merrimack st., overseer. 

O'Brien, Daniel J., 90 Park View ave., real estate. 

O'Brien, John J., 54 Pleasant st., slater. 

O'Brien, Charles T., 162 Church st., laborer. 

O'Brien, Joseph H., 768 Merrimack st., clerk. 

O'Brien, William H., 94 Fort Hill ave., chiropodist. 

O'Connell, Luke, 64 Fay st., retired. 

O'Connell, William E., 183 Stackpole st., goldsmith. 

O'Connell, Richard A., 505 Westford st., dealer. 

O'Connor, Edward F., 251 Moore st., grocer. 

O'Connor, John J., 298 Riverside st., contractor. 

O'Connor, Thomas F., 823 Lawrence st., agent. 

O'Donnell, Charles H., 33 Chapel st., wholesale cigars. 

O'Dowd, Henry J., 423 High st., carriage dealer. 

O'Dwyer, Jeremiah J., 148 Midland st., conductor. 

O'Hagan, Michael, 29 Albion st., operative. 

O'Hare, James, 27 Ellsworth st., teamster. 

O'Hare, John P., 27 Abbott st., carpet weaver. 

O'Hearn, Thomas B., 282 Riverside st., contractor. 

O'Neil, Daniel P., 74 Weed st., manufacturer. 

O'Neil, Arthur J., 386 Concord st., clerk. 

O'Neill, James J., 129 Crowley st., cashier. 

O'Neil], Peter, 120 Bowden st., carpenter. 

Osgood, Daniel L., 151 Cabot st., overseer. 

O'Shea, Michael, 149 Concord st., machinist. 

O 'Sullivan, Timothy F., 195 Cross st., manager. 

Osterhout, Fred S., 123 Westford st., commercial traveler. 

Ouellette, Stephen, 50 Lamb st,, operative. 



LIST OF JURORS 25 



Palmer, Forrest E., 1 Barton ave., bookkeeper. 

Paradis, Peter, 526 School st., barber. 

Parent, Philias, 7 Whiting st., machinist. 

Parker, Percy, 880 Broadway, capitalist. 

Patenaude, Charles S., 233 Walker st., engraver. 

Parthenais, David A., 30 Phillips st., clerk. 

Patten, Henry N., 235 Mammoth rd., bookkeeper. 

Patten, William T., 205 Mammoth rd., dealer. 

Payette, Adelard, 20 James st., retired. 

Payette, Joseph, 31 Gershom ave., tailor. 

Payne, John, 181 Stackpole st., dealer. 

Pearson, George F., 24 Grace st., clerk. 

Pascall, Frederick, 58 Carlisle st., machinist. 

Perkins, Stewart, 43 Gates st., barber. 

Perley, George E., 79 Florence ave., bank teller. 

Perreault, David, 616 Stevens st., jeweler. 

Perreault, Arthur C, 199 Stackpole st., tanner. 

Perreault, George H., 90 Aiken st., salesman. 

Perreault, Oscar A., 8-51 Brookings st., clerk. 

Perron, Joseph, 315 Summer st., barber. 

Person, Nils, 82 London st., carpenter. 

Phelps, John L., 1-29 Boynton st., carpenter. 

Phornare, Anthony, 35 Burns st., clerk. 

Pickering, Samuel A., 59 Hastings st., carpenter. 

Pickering, George L., 27 Butterfield st., carpenter. 

Pinkham, Arthur S., 27 Harrison st., publicity manager. 

Piper, Fred, 15 Bellevue st., clerk. 

Plaisted, Burton W., 110 Warwick st., clerk. 

Pollard, Harry G., 96 Mansur st., merchant, 

Potter, William H., 251 Gibson st,, cigar and tobacco dealer. 

Power, Warren M., 73 Fletcher st,, editor. 

Preston, Charles R., 201-203 Appleton st,, civil engineer. 

Preston, James F., 403 Andover st,, treasurer. 

Primeau, John, 883 Lakeview ave., motorman. 

Prince, Arthur D., 5 Simpson st., merchant. 

Proctor, Charles S., 187 Hovey st., paper dealer. 

Proctor, Frank D., 248 Foster st., clerk. 

Putnam, Addison, 70 Fairmount st,, merchant. 

Putnam, Alonzo, Jr., 19 Eighth ave., salesman. 



26 LIST OF JURORS 

Putnam, Frank H., 12 Marlborough st., dealer. 
Putnam, Lewis A., 19 Eighth ave., clerk. 
Peltier, Willis, 801 Moody st,; jeweller. 



Queenan, Eugene C, 48 Varney st., clerk. 
Queenan, James J., 5 Harrison st., clerk. 
Quigley, John M., 62 Inland st., teamster. 
Quill, Daniel, 85 Ellis ct., barber. 
Quimby, Henry F., 105 Chestnut st., electrician. 
Quinn, Felix, Jr., 67 Bartlett st., laborer. 
Quinn, Timothy, 109 Sherman st., foreman. 
Quirbach, Henry C, 21 Fairfax ave., cigar maker. 

R 

Racette, John, 527 Moody st., manufacturer. 
Rafferty, Michael T., 15 Auburn st., hack driver. 
Ralls, Austin, 36 Third ave., clerk. 
Ranlett, Fred M., 445 Merrimack st., dealer. 
Rawling, Frank, 11 Linwood St., machinist. 
Ready, Frank E., 221 Hildreth st,, carpenter. 
Ready, John J., 193 East Merrimack, operative. 
Ready, Patrick J., 26 Saratoga st., tanner. 
Ready, William B., 10 Bertha st., barber. 
Ready, William E., 67 Walker st,, dealer. 
Riensterna, Torsten, 43 Sidney st., wool sorter. 
Regan, Michael J., 649 School st., motorman. 
Regan, Peter J., 316 Rogers st., laborer. 
Regan, Denis, 27 Windsor st., checker. 
Reilley, Timothy, 32 High st., barber. 
Reilley, Peter W., 137 Hovey st., printer. 
Renaud, Willie, 32 Apple st., laborer. 
Reynolds, Michael, 139 Chapel st., expressman. 
Ricard, Francois Xavier, 420 Fletcher st,, jeweler. 
Richards, Charles H., 23 Fort Hill ave., collector. 
Richards, John B., 770 Moody st., clerk. 
Richards, Lyman H., 170 Crawford st., carpenter. 
Richburg, William H., 232 Varnum ave., shoe cutter. 
Rigby, William H., 19 Seventh ave., superintendent. 
Riley, Charles, 65 Chestnut st., smoke inspector. 



LIST OF JURORS 27 

Riley, Luke J., 101 Third st., barber. 

Riley, William, 43 Prospect St., garage. 

Riordan, George J., 9 Robert St., water works. 

Riordon, Warren P., 21 Orchard st., sealer. 

Rivet, Francis L., 484 Moody st., dealer. 

Roach, Henry A., 211 Methuen st., retired. 

Roach, Patrick Francis, 85 Moore st., bookkeeper. 

Roark, James S., 210 Parker st., plumber. 

Roark, John J., 210 Parker st., clerk. 

Robertson, William L., 468 Andover st., merchant. 

Robertson, John L., 470 Andover st., furniture dealer. 

Robinson, William S., 40 Crowley st., U. S. C. Co. 

Rogers, John F., 29 Cedar st., undertaker. 

Roouey, John J., 238 Pine st., superintendent. 

Rooney, James H., 238 Pine st., dentist. 

Rourke, John, 9 Sixth ave., janitor. 

Rosseau, Willie, 14 Spaulding, dealer. 

Rousseau, Arthur, 14 Spaulding, carpenter. 

Rousseau, Napoleon C, 332 East Merrimack st., clerk. 

Roux, J. Arthur, 9 White St., contractor. 

Rowe, Thomas H., 97 Varney st., clerk. 

Rowland, Charles T., 5 Belmont st., wholesale grocer. 

Roy, Joseph G., 87 Chestnut st., salesman. 

Royal, Garrett G., 32 Phillips st., operative. 

Runels, George H., 240 Gibson st., real estate. 

Runels, Ralph E., 4 Harland ave., dealer. 

Russell, John L., 17 Victoria st., manager. 

Ryan, Albert J., 756 Westford st., real estate. 

Ryan, Daniel G., 97 Humphrey st., contractor. 

Ryan, Patrick, 46 Birch st., clerk. 

Ryan, Thomas S., 42 Sidney st., printer. 

Robbins, George L., 20 Willow st., engineer. 

Rousseau, Ferdinand, 691 Merrimack st., machinist. 

Ryan, Stephen J., 73 Stevens st., hatter. 



Sadlier, George E., 46 Keene st., clerk. 
Sadlier, William F., 194 Meadowcroft St., inspector. 
Safford, Arthur T., 266 Andover st., engineer. 
Sanderson, George, 505 Moody st., operative. 



28 LIST OF JURORS 

Sanderson, George W., 137 Stackpole st., clerk. 

Sargent, George A., 49 Andover st., lineman. 

Sarre, Louis, 238 Wilder st., dealer. 

Sarre, Leon E., 842 Varnum ave., picture framing. 

Saunders, Thomas A., 325 Mammoth rd., agent. 

Sayers, John F., 13 Rockdale ave., conductor. 

Savard, Aime E., 311 Mammoth rd., baker. 

Savard, John, 717 Middlesex st., machinist. 

Scannell, Bartholomew, 535 Westford st., manufacturer. 

Scannell, William J., 62 Cambridge St., boiler maker. 

Scott, George N., 238 Chelmsford st., woodworker. 

Scott, John, 23 Meadowcroft st., janitor. 

Scott, William C, 58 East Merrimack st., machinist. 

Scott, W. Norman, 732 Stevens st., bookkeeper. 

Scribner, George A., 158 Westford st., machinery dealer. 

Sealey, Eldridge N., 120 High st., engineer. 

Secord, Freeland, 3-49 Wilder st., D. L. Gage Co. 

Senter, Arthur H., 238 Cabot st., carpenter. 

Sharkey, John W., 8 Carter st., salesman. 

Sharkey, Michael J., 159 Smith st., real estate dealer. 

Sheehan, James, 105 Andrews st., U. S. B. Co. 

Sheehan, James A., 30 Fort Hill ave., clerk. 

Sheahan, Michael J., 46 Agawam st., conductor. 

Sheehy, James, 3 Pleasant st., provision clerk. 

Shepard, Charles S., 100 Hanks st., steam fitter. 

Sherman, Arthur W., 12 Chester st., clerk. 

Sherman, Leonard F., 148 Princeton st., shoe manufacturer. 

Sherwell, William M., 2 Barton ave., paymaster. 

Sicard, Armand V., 720 Moody st., shoemaker. 

Sicard, Jean B., 130 Avon st., dealer. 

Silcox, Samuel, 19 Robert st., machinist. 

Silver, Fred W., 94 So. Loring st., machinist. 

Simmons, Ralph A., 128 Westford st., clerk. 

Slattery, Charles D., 73 Pleasant st., clerk. 

Slattery, Edward F., Jr., 122 Hoyt ave., real estate. 

Smith, Charles P., 314 Nesmith st,, real estate. 

Smith, Chester F., 250 Foster st,, travelling man. 

Smith, EdAvard A., 425 Broadway st., machinist. 

Smith, Henry A., 42 Mansur st., insurance. 

Smith, Henry, 37 Varnum st., barber. 

Smith, Omer, 90 Aiken st,, janitor. 



LIST OF JURORS 29 

Smith, Orange V., 812 Stevens st., machinist. 

Smith, Thomas M., 198 Holyrood ave., clerk. 

Smith, Walter, 36 State st., machine repairer. 

Smith, William F., 58 Seventh st., machinist. 

Smithson, Angelo L., 5 Myrtle st., overseer. 

Somerset, Alfred J., 104 Woodward ave., clerk. 

Somerset, James, 104 Woodward ave., janitor. 

Southam, Brook, 130 Westford st., overseer. 

Spence, George T., 236 Chelmsford st., mfgr. 

Stanley, Harry L., 135 Beacon st., coal dealer. 

Stanton, John B., 23 Newhall st., wool sorter. 

Starr, George S., 144 High st., weaver. 

Stearns, Frank K., 122 Eleventh st., laundry. 

St. Cyr, Adelard, 110 Bartlett st., fireman. 

St. Hilaire, Arthur, 110 Ford st., operative. 

St. Hillaire, James, 15 Second ave., mason. 

St. Onge, Alexandre, 406 Stevens st., baker. 

Stone, Edward F., 60 Lawrence Corp., Race st., operative. 

Sturtevant, Augustus L., 32 Brookside st., clerk. 

Stafford, William, 787 Moody st,, clerk. 

Stewart, Arthur A., 53 Mt. Hope st., instructor. 

Surprenant, Joseph, 537 Moody st., dealer. 

Silcox, Albert E., 45 Dunfey st., machinist. 

Sullivan, Daniel, 105 Moore st., merchant. 

Sullivan, Daniel T., 223 Stackpole st., dealer. 

Sullivan, Eugene, 55 Bartlett st., tailor. 

Sullivan, George S., 33 Butterfield st., clerk. 

Sullivan, Eugene P., 84 Maple st., primer. 

Sullivan, John E., 58 Corbett st., B. & M. R. R. 

Sullivan, John J., Jr., 114 Beech st,, agent. 

Sullivan, Michael, 57 Hampstead, grocer. 

Sullivan, Richard H., 28 Franklin st., teamster. 

Sullivan, Thomas, A. D., 28 Grove st., dealer. 

Sullivan, William H., 724 Bridge st., fish dealer. 

Sullivan, William J., 17 Bowers st., plumber. 

Sykes, Richard, 21 Rockingham st., overseer. 

T 

Tansey, John F., 322 East Merrimack st., coachman. 
Taylor, Samuel A., 12 Chase ave., watchman. 



30 LIST OF JURORS 

Tellier, Alderic, 236 White st., clerk. 
Thibeault, Archie, 68 Lane st.; clerk. 
Thomas, Charles R., 725 Stevens st., upholsterer. 
Thomas, John, 45 Tolman ave., teamster. 
Thomas, Robert R., 24 Loring st., electrician. 
Thompson, James A., 68 Grove st., box manufacturer. 
Thompson, Martin B., 242 Cabot st., overseer. 
Thompson, Samuel H., 121 School st., hardware. 
Thorpe, James, 100 Riverside st., treasurer Glass Co. 
Tighe, Edward J., 72 Chestnut st., shoe cutter. 
Toomey, Eugene F., 170 Lawrence st., clerk. 
Toupin, Hercule A., 320 Hildreth st., druggist. 
Tracy, James H., 147 Concord st., laborer. 
Tremblay, Onesime, 17 James st., operative. 
Trepanier, J. Edmond, 11 Willie ave., piper. 
Trull, George T., 752 Andover st., student. 
Tryon, Edward R., 182 Riverside st., salesman. 
Turcotte, Arthur E., 553 Fletcher st., clerk. 
Turcotte, Louis P., 553 Fletcher st., liquor dealer. 
Turcotte, Oswald, 33 Ellis ct., baker. 
Trottier, William, 60 Hampshire st., journalist. 
Tully, John J., 17 So. Whipple st., clerk. 
Tuttle, Joseph T., 3 Dane ave., clerk. 
Turgeon, Philippe, 50 Chestnut st., machinist. 
Twohey, Edward, 14 Madison st., contractor. 
Tyler, William H., 30 Epping st., gardener. 



Vandenberg, William C, 386 Andover st., insurance. 

Veevers, Miles, 218 Moore st., agent. 

Vigeant, Paul, 48 Riverside st., grain dealer. 

Viney, William B., 22 Tyler st., clerk. 

Voisard, Hector, 99 White st., clerk. 

Vaughan, John H., 14 Leverett st., boiler maker. 

W 

Wadleigh, Jude C, 305 Andover st., mill agent. 
Walker, George H., 153 Winthrop ave., clerk. 
Walker, Everett H., 121 Hall st., agent. 



LIST OF JURORS 3J 

Walker, Hugh G., 18 Pihl st., clerk. \i 

Walker, Roger L., 80 Chestnut st., clerk. j 

Walker, Thomas C, 80 Chestnut st., druggist. 

Walmsley, John, 8 Waterford st., clerk. 

Warnock, Francis A., 13 Wamesit st., plasterer. 

Watson, Henry L., 84 Rolfe st., printer. 

Watson, Peter, 84 Rolfe st., printer. 

Webster, Herbert C, 428 Rogers st., toolmaker. 

Weilbrenner, Pierre L. H., 284 Branch st., clerk. 

Welch, Andrew, 353 Bridge st., laborer. 

Welch, Benjamin F., 160 Shaw st., foreman. 

Welch, Richard J., 543 Andover st., plumber. 

Welch, John F., 70 Livingston ave., plumber. 

Welch, Martin F., 64 Pleasant st., tanner. 

Welch, Frederick F., 30 Riverside st., cabinet maker. 

Wells, Arthur, 11 Harding st., watchman. 

Wentworth, Ansel W., 35 Woodward ave., operative. 

Westall, William E., 63 Dover st., merchant. 

Weston, Charles F., 32 Colonial ave., belt maker. 

Whitcomb, Irving, 282 Appleton st., clerk. 

White, James A., 154 A st., agent. 

White, John F., 9 Grace st., clerk. 

White, William T., 86 Belmont ave., manufacturer of leather. 

Whitney, Walter, 8 Livermore st., machinist. 

Whittet, David W., 34 Wentworth ave., carpenter. 

Whittier, Stephen T., 26 Hanks st., paymaster. 

Wilde, Thomas E., 1198 Lawrence st., manager. 

Wilder, Wesley M., 24 Coral st., hay and grain dealer. 

Wilder, William H., 187 Pleasant st., woolen weaver. 

Wilder, William F., 20 Huntington st., plumber. 

Willman, Clarence T., 36 Chambers st., spinner. 

Wilmot, Alexander W., 129 Ennell st., overseer. 

Wilmot, Joseph, 52 Crawford st., superintendent. 

Wing, Charles H., 577 School st., merchant. 

Winn, John J., 29 So. Whipple st., mattress maker. 

Wood, Joseph W., 76 Campaw st., conductor. 

Woodcock, William, 17 Crescent st., second hand. 

Worsnip, Robert S., 850 Lakeview ave., spinner. 

Wyman, Alonzo, 53 Bartlett st., machinist. 

Wyman, Stephen T., 185 Stackpole st., city library. 



32 LIST OF JURORS 



Young, Charles M., 351 Parker st., undertaker. 
Young, Charles F., 627 Central st., decorator. 
Young, William, 430 Lakeview ave., piper. 

Z 

Ziskind, David, 75 Gates st., dealer. 



HUGH C. McOSKER, 
J. OMER ALLARD, 
FRED HARRISON, 
STEPHEN FLYNN, 

Board of Registrars of Voters. 






ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Department 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 
MASSACHUSETTS 




1918 



THE LAWLER PRINTING CO. «^> 16 MARKET STREET 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Office of the Superintendent of Police, 
Lowell, Mass., January 31, 1918 

Hon. Perry D. Thompson, 

Mayor and Commissioner of Public Safety, 

Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir : 

I most respectfully present to you a report of the work per- 
formed by the police department for the fiscal year ending- 
December 31, 1918. 

Respectfully yours, 

REDMOND WELCH, 

Superintendent of Police. 



The organization of the police department for the year ending 
December 31, 1918, was as follows: 

Superintendent, Deputy Superintendent, two Captains, six 
Lieutenants, seven Sergeants, one Inspector, one hundred twenty- 
six regular patrolmen, twenty-six Reserve Officers, one special police 
woman, one electrician, one line man, four chauffeurs, one matron, 
one stenographer, one desk man, one charman, one stableman. 
Population estimated, 125,000. Area, 14.1 square miles. 
Accepted streets, 144.08 miles. Unaccepted streets, 73 miles. 
Appropriation for year, $210,610.60. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following named were appointed to the reserve force during 
the year 1918: 

Owen S. Conway, Donat J. Brunelle, Timothy Riordan, John 
J. Mc Manns, Patrick S. Leavitt. 

Miss Emily M. Skilton was appointed police woman. 



PROMOTIONS 

The following promotions were made during the year 1918. 
David Petrie from the rank of Sergeant to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Bartholomew Ryan from the rank of Sergeant to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Philip Dwyer from court officer to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrick J. Frawley, from wagon officer to the rank of Sergeant. 
Peter P. M c M anmon from Patrolman to the rank of Sergeant. 
George B. Palmer from Patrolman to the rank of Sergeant. 



RESIGNATION 
Patrolman Henry E. Somers resigned June 18, 1918 



necrology 



Officer George S. Abbott died September 9, 1918 
Born in England July 4, 1869. 
Appointed to the force, June 15, 1898 



Officer Michael J. Clancy died October 12, 1918 
Born in Ireland, January, 1873.| 
Appointed to the force, March 19, 1901 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

OF THE • 

Lowell Police Department 

JANUARY 1, 1918 TO DECEMBER 31, 1918 



RECORD OF ARRESTS, 1918 

AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER 



OFFENCES 



a 
< 



2 



Abortion 

Adultery 

Aiding and abetting soldier in 

purchase of liquor 

Auto law, violating 

Bastardy 

Being present where gaming im- 
plements were found 

Being present at a game on the 

Lord's Day 

Capias 

Carrying weapons 

Contempt of court 

City Ordinance, violating 

Cruelty to animals 

Deserter from U.S. Army 

Delinquents 

Disturbing the peace 

Disturbing public meeting 

Dog, keeping unlicensed 

Drunkenness 

Escaped from prison 

False registration at hotel 

Failing to register in the draft . . . 
Failure to engage in useful occu- 
pation 

Failure tofile questionnaire 

Fornication 

Fugitive from justice 

Gambling 

Giving false weight 

Holding himself out as a prac 
titioner 

Hunting law, violation 

Idle and vicious life 

Idle and disorderly 

Indecent exposure 

Infant, abandoning 

Interfering with officer 

Interfering with enlistments . . . 

Insane 

Keeping disorderly house 

Keeping openshop on Lord s 
Day 

Lewd cohabitation 

Labor law, violation of 

Lewdness 

Liquor law, violation of 

Maintaining gaming resort . . . 

Milk law, violation of 

Neglected children 

Neglect of family 

Opium law, violation of 

Permitting gaming apparatus on 
premises 

Permitting minor to loiter in 
pool room 

Polygamy 

Procuring woman for prostitu- 
tion y 

Playing game on Lord s Day. . . . 

Plumbing law, violation of 

Profanity 

Pure food law, violation of . . . 

Safe keeping. . . . 

School law, violation of 

Stubbornness 

Surrendered by bondsman .... 

Suspicious person 

Truancy 

Vagrants 



1 
3 

17 

38 
3 
3 

1 
1 

5 
2 



10 



24 



20 

1 

6 
12 



Total 443 435 



55 

22 
9 
1 

1 
1 

15 
4 



212 212 
2 



1 

33 

1 

3 

22 



323 
1 



10 



11 



28 

4 

20 
3 
2 



503 



24 

4 
1 
9 
4 



357 



4 
4 
1 

101 

40 1 

i 

li 

1 

2 
13! 



193 ! 304 

2 3 



30 
5 

3 



553 



328 



19 



596 



23 

46 
2 



23 
5 
2 
2 
3 

2 

36 

3 

2 

282 
1 



17 



3 
75 

14 

1 

19 



1 
5 

34 

32 

2 

15 

28 
6 
7 

11 

1 

13 
5 



337 
3 
1 
1 

9 

3 



1 
2 

2 
2 
li 
4 

ii 

2 



2 

105 

7 
22 



588 



689 



24 
3 
2 



9 
2 

1 

425 



15 



1 

5 1 



463 

2 

5 

11 

7 



2 
1 

99 

4 

12 
2 



47 

12 

3 



25 31 

4| 4 



1 
4 
1 
2 
14 
4 

1 

426 

1 



11 
165 

9 

12 



705 



780 787 



686 



71J 



AGAINST THE PERSON 



OFFENCES 



Assault and battery 

Assault with a dangerous weapon 

Assault with a knife 

Assaw'.t on an officer 

Manslaughter 

Murder, Attempt 

Murder 

Rape, Attempt 

Rape 

Robbery, Attempt 

Robbery 

Threats 

Unnatural Act 

Total 



17 



21 



13 



20 



a 



25 



27 



35 



12 



16 



26 

1 

1 
1 



34 



< 



34 



51 



•/. 



24 



32 



IS 



28 



17 



15 



19 



217 
2 
7 
8 
30 
2 
2 

3 

7 
11 
20 

1 



311 



AGAINST THE PROPERTY 



Arson 

Attempt, Larceny 

Attempt, breaking and entering 

Breaking and enteri ng 

Frauduiently obtaining money. . 

Larceny 

Malicious injury to property. . . . 
Matches not kept in proper re- 
ceptacle 

Receiving stolen goods 

Removing baggage 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk 

Riding freight 

Sale, mortgaged property 

Suspicion of larceny 

Trespass 

Unlawfully taking a team 

Unlawfully using an automobile 
Walking on railroad tracks . . . 

Total 



< 



2 
9 

2G 



3 

9 

34 
2 



3 

< 



25 28 42 40 44 65 63 1 49 36 38 60 ' 66 556 



GO 



6 

1 

27 



1 
8 

44 

1 



18 

41 
4 



1 

6 
3 

77 

1 

378 

10 

1 

23 

2 

2 

4 

8 

6 

18 

3 

3 

10 



DISTRIBUTION OF OFFENCES 
ACCORDING TO SEX 





B 
eS 

1-5 


0J 


sJ 
3 




>> 
at 


4) 

p 


H9. 


si 
P 

<< 


ft 
<u 
QQ 


o 
O 


> 

o 


Q 


"3 
o 


Men 


427 

42 

20 

5 


385 
37 
54 
15 


435 
69 
61 
21 


350 
26 
46 
13 


498 

41 

93 

6 


581 

67 
12 


517 
36 

132 
36 


{ 

653 
42 
94 
13 


656 

57 

60 

9 


674 
65 

107 
21 


749 
45 
70 

14 


676 
42 
53 
10 


6601 


Women 


531 


Minora 


857 


Delinquents 


175 






Total 


494 


491 


586 


435 


638 


689 


721 


802 


782 


867 


878 


781 


8164 







DISTRIBUTION OF OFFENCES ACCORDING 
TO NATIONALITY 





a 

98 






a 

< 


> 


V 

SS 

3 

1-5 


•— > 


H 

P 
< 






> 


z: 


c 



Q 


"3 

O 

H 


United States 


206 
10 
60 

7 
62 
79 
25 

2 
38 


238 
10 
58 

2 
56 
53 
35 

3 
21 


292 

10 

111 

6 

49 

10 

32 

3 

52 


213 
10 
52 

9 
38 
38 
30 

8 
24 


35 
12 

84 
6 
87 
17 
18 
7 
51 

632 


350 
28 

107 
9 
69 
19 
37 
16 
42 


395 
24 
85 
5 
82 
16 
34 
15 
29 


412 

14 

95 

2 

121 
37 
39 
11 
58 


4O6 

18 

136 

5 

88 

17 

50 

5 

48 


452 

18 

132 

8 

117 

18 

44 

7 

50 


479 

17 
130 
10 
10 
18 
59 
5 
36 


444 

16 

125 

5 

83 

48 

21 

3 

26 


4238 


England 


187 


Ireland 


1175 


Scotland 


73 


British Provinces 


962 


Greek 


370 


Russia 


424 


Turkish Empire 


85 


Miscellaneous 


475 






Total 


489 


476 


565 


422 


677 


685 


789 


773 


846 


864 


77li79«o 









DISTRIBUTION OF OFFENCES ACCORDING TO 
TRADES AND PROFESSIONS 





s 

S3 

1-5 


.0 

<D 


S3 

s 


"S 

a 


03 
<5 


0J 

C 
p 

t-3 


3 

>-5 

26 
40 
195 
61 
4 
11 

177 
22 
31 
43 

22 
53 


3 
< 


SG 




O 


> 

!Z 




<v 

Q 


S3 
O 


Building Trades 


12 

31 

151 

73 

5 

5 

2 

1 

152 

20 

12 

5 

8 

12 


22 

35 

156 

43 

3 

6 

5 

116 

21 

13 

29 

2 

25 


16 

43 

152 

26 

1 

5 

187 

48 

28 

30 

8 

3 

18 


10 

36 

145 

28 

1 

3 

112 

20 
19 

28 

5 
15 


32 

40 

142 

38 

3 

10 

1 

208 

37 

19 

18 

6 
19 
59 


32 

41 

170 

55 

5 

8 

3 

192 

23 

32 

10 

50 
56 


36 

45 

220 

54 

3 

8 

8 

227 

24 

36 

4 
29 
10 

82 
3 


31 

45 

219 

55 

2 

13 

2 

1 

213 

24 

48 

13 

28 
79 


24 

51 

247 

57 

8 

7 

2 

265 

26 

34 

21 

18 

84 

2 


33 

59 

221 

60 

13 

7 

208 

18 

39 

26 

26 

153 

1 


35 
52 
202 
60 
10 
6 

185 
19 
37 
30 

25 

105 

6 


309 


Mechanical Trades 

Mill and Factory 


518 
2220 


Shops and Stores * . 


610 


Professional 

Agricultural 


44 

91 


Clothing and Girb 


4 


Agents, etc 


33 


Laborers 


2241 


Service Domestic, etc 


302 


Transportation . . 


348 


Children 


257 


None 


51 


Miscellaneous 


208 


Soldiere 


741 


Sailors 


12 






Total 


489 


476 


565 


422 


632 


677 


685 


789 


773 


846 


864 


771 7989 









DIVISIONAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Lowell Police Department 

JANUARY 1, 1918 TO DECEMBER 31, 1918 



00 
I—. 
05 
i— ( 

2 

W 

o 

OS 
H 

< 

a. 

tu 
O 

H 

O 

cu- 
rt: 
o- 

r~ 
£ 
Z 

o 

2 











CO 






















CO 






!» 


«# CN CN CN GO rH t- 


-»J 


COrH NlOHr 


* b-0«C 


CNrH 


O 


NN OirH rH NCN 




CO 


E-i 


CO 


■*frHCN 
























w 












o 












o 






ci 


■*1-H 


NiC © rH iO X t-» 




CO 


Q 


CO rH 


CN CO 

i—i 












* 












© 






> 


OS O COCSrHCO ^ ■* t^ ■* 5C 


rH b» 


c 


rH rft O 

CO .-i 


CO CO 
CO 




CO 








«e 






*» 


00 00 rH «5 © rH © CfflNNMWNN 


COCO CO 


•4© OS 




* 


o 


CN 


CN CO 
CN 












«• 












O 






+5 


■««(N CO>OCNO ©CNCOCN 




CO© 


a 


1— 1 1— 1 1-- l-H ^H ■ CO I s - 




CN 


& 


co 


>C rH 






CO 






CO 












t- 






— 






cn 






3 
M 

3 


*0 CO CO 00 — 1 CO 


es 


CNrH 


i-l OS I s - 


COrH© 




CN 


CN 


© rH 






<*, 






«, 












»H 






>> 


©b- 


^OSCNr- 


00 00-h 


c 


© rH 




rHCC 


CO I- 


•CNCN 




"* 


3 


cs 










»-» 






© 
0» 












© 
© 

•CN rHrH 






v 


mo 


©^ «: 


— i 


rH CO rH 


a 


COCC 


COCN r- 


CNON-* 




CO 


3 


CN 




rH i-H 






>-s 






CN 
ft* 








rH CN rH TJH CO rH C 


©COO 


CO 


CO 




rHCC 


OSCN i- 


©rHCO 




CO 


>> 


<N 




rH 






K 






»© 






s 






35 
9» 








»OCN 


CirHCN-* 


©OSb-rH 




rH»rH 




»* 


©H r- 


M3iO'* 








*— 




i-{ 






"»■ 






© 






a 






© 






«! 




' CO 
CO 


ft* 








rH cs 


O I s - 


00 00 00 >o CO 


b-CO 


43 


coce 


b- 


CN00CN 




CN 


o 


CN 




• rHCO 






u 






CO 






e« 






OS 






s 




O 


w 








00 CO 


O 6C 


© iO ^ CN CN CO CN 




rtC 


o 


kO-fO 




CN 


X! 


CN 




"HcN 






V 






"* 






fe 






0» 












© 












© 








lOOC 


CSCNJ "<f 


• -#CO 




co©—' 


3 


coo: 


t- 


lONO 




CO 


r3 


r- 




cokoeo 






►"» 






CN 










• T3 • • 


i 












• 03 06 




> 






















• u^6 




o 






















• 3-3 




u 




















M 


. o co 




03 




















G 
3 
u 
TJ 

s 

o 
-C 

5 J 

.2 a 

V. u 

n \- 
H <r 
te si 

C C 


lation of liquor law. . . . 
ldin£8 found open and se 
ectivo streets and sidew 


T 

c 
(- 
C 

+- 



& 

■i- 


1- 

Fi 

e 

G 

"3 

90 

"3 

3 . a 


b 
e 

"S 

1- 

JE 

4> 

c 

IT 

1 


t 

c 

X 


O 
03 "C 

>h a 

"X 

c — 

^^ 
M 


X 
c 

E 

& 

c 
c 

c 

s 

4- 


x 

c 
T 
c 

cr 

- 


1 

c 

B 
4 






8 a 


.235.S8 


>— h " £ rt 

rt <U r!43 4) 


cr 
r 


JS.1! 




pua 


;>pcQ&. 


>— 


> 


c 


C£ 


HC 


C 


C 


K 





00 



u 

O 
-J 

o 

a: 
w 
cu 

O 

H 
as 

O 

a- 
Cd 

Oh 

J 
X 

H 
Z 

o 



"e! 

O 

H 


45409.08 

173 

6 

901 

14 

16 


ci 

03 

Q 


rH 

rH IO CO 
rH O 
rH rH 
CO 

w 


> 

O 


CO 

OCO OS rH 

OSrH OS 

«C 

CO 

(r» 


o 


«o 

© 

b-lC © rH 

•* OS 
00 

«r> 


-** 

a 

03 


©"<*< b- rH 
OSrH 00 

w 


3 


00 

-a 

^rHCNCOCNrH 

«*CN 00 

iO 

CO 

09 


r-S 


CO 

— i© CNb-cN 

00 rH CO 

«.o 

CN 
W 


03 


3 

r-» 


CO 

CN rHCOCS rHrH 

HN 00 

00 
CN 

M 


>) 


CN 
t> 

COkO CN 

CNCN 

1—1 

CN 

«9 


'u 


CN 

CNCN HOCJI 
©CN b- 

00 

rH 
«r> 


43 
03 

U 

sS 


00 

l-( 

yfy-i 00 eo 
CNCO I s - 

CN 


X! 

03 


© 

«o 

COCO 00 ■* 

CN «* 

OS 

(A 


G 

r-S 


CO 

© 

I s - 'O 

iC b» 

•* 

CN 

ft* 




. . . . cc . 

: s «i : c j 

§•§ £ : o a 
*% i^J s « 

G >- aa«H G _ 
03 *> c™ 03 * 
v to s G u G 

+> >t3«£ r= " 

03 O Ih g W >> 

^POcOhJOQ 






00 



1Z 

.w 

2 
O 

to 

o 

CO 

H 

CO 

W 

a: 
as 

to 
O 

o 
to 

< 

to 

2 

13 

o 
cu 

to 
O 

to* 

O 
to 
to 
to 

-J 

Z 

o 



T-l t-*,-i tf5 Ki CN Tf X 



,-4~H O 



rH -HCN _l 






< 



m i-hi-h co <n eoi-H*- i-i co 



CO l-H f-H <-4 fH 



4© 



o 



60 fc. . 
3 O >> 

•gsi 



3 
O 

o « *^ 



- — — - - Jl - 

■g.S 3 3-a-S 35 a 
-S3 



■•9 

0) c 



ao-ig-g 



<OOQQfe 



w -> s w c 
§i> S * » 

a-3 08 « o> 

— — — ; — : _ ; 



O ao 

2o ■ * 2 -a 

3 Q. 3 o r °2 5 
:J2 3 es > © aj-- 

fl i S g J3 M.3 







^> OE 

<* 3 
08 O 

+» 50 

£ >>'§. 



REPORT OF CRIMINAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION FOR 1919 



MONTH 



Arrests Lost & Stolen 



Recovered 



Still Missing 



January. . 
February . 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December . 

Totals 



31 

27 
28 
29 
26 
24 
23 
28 
25 
29 
26 
34 



330 



$700 . 00 
765.00 
815.00 
642.00 
545 . 00 
460 . 00 
670 . 00 
640.00 
574 . 00 
605.00 
710.00 
795.00 



',921.00 



$644.00 
720.00 
745 . 00 
520.00 
490 . 00 
380.00 
540 . 00 
550.00 
475.00 
578.00 
660.00 
740.00 



$7,042.00 



$55.00 
45.00 
70.00 

122.00 
55.00 
80.00 

130.00 
90.00 
99.00 
27.00 
50.00 
55.00 



$879.00 



RECOVERED FOR OTHER CITIES 



Lawrence, Mass $2,b75.00 

Manchester, N. H 1,275.00 

Biddeford, Me 200.00 



Nashua, N. H $500.00 

Maiden, Mass 525.00 

Concord, N. H 550.00 

Total $5,725.00 



ARRESTED FOR OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS 



Providence, .R 1 2 

Manchester, N. H 7 

Montpelier, 1 

Nashua, N. H 2 

New Haven, Conn 1 

Natick, Mass 1 

Springfield, Mass 1 

Methuen, Mass 1 

Lexington, Mass 1 



Lawrence, Mass 3 

Aver, Mass ". 1 

Boston, Mass 5 

Stoughton, Mass 1 

Concord, Mass . 1 

Peabody, Mass 1 

Ipswich, Mass 1 

Biddeford, Me 2 



Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES BROSNAN, 



Captain of Police. 



REPORT OF SIGNAL SYSTEM 



MONTH 



Dutv Calls 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 

Totals 



38 
34 
38 
37 
36 
34 
35 
34 
34 
33 
34 
37 



,016 
,165 
,700 

,975 
,899 
,952 
,026 
,332 
,144 
,026 
,356 
,272 



428,863 



Telephone 



3,693 
3,612 
3,854 
3,562 
3,691 
3,534 
3,410 
3,520 
3,400 
3,888 
3,860 
3,812 



43,836 



Wagon 



209 
200 
290 
199 
324 
361 
308 
405 
394 
467 
468 
377 



Prisoners 



305 
302 
381 
256 
411 
467 
397 
538 
524 
557 
639 
485 



4,002 



Miles 



242 
224 
356 
269 
411 
433 
426 
516 
483 
584 
548 
428 



5.262 



4,920 



% 
\ 

c 

\ 

1 

[X 
I 




^m^: